View Full Version : Share one piece of career advice with us


anonymouslyadd
09-10-17, 10:04 PM
There seems to be a lot of wisdom on these forums that may help all of us at work. Whether you've had great success on the job or learned bitter lessons at ones that you couldn't stand, share one tip of career advice with us. This could be a tip on handling your coworkers better, something you observed or a way to complete something in a noisy environment. I have many to share but will start with the first one. Let's make this a great source of advice for us all!

If you can't be tactful, don't do it. Even something beneficial will be hard to accept if not relayed properly.

anonymouslyadd
09-10-17, 10:19 PM
Pay attention to what the president says and what his subordinates do. He may have a vision of something but if his people beneath him don't buy into it, you may have a hard time implementing his vision.

Abi
09-10-17, 10:34 PM
Don't buy the lie that your job defines you, or that good performance at work makes you somehow "better".

In fact, eschew the word "career" in favour of "job". The term "career" is loaded with connotations imposed upon us by the [ca....] system.

View your job realistically - it is a means of making money to sustain yourself and nothing more.

aeon
09-10-17, 11:30 PM
Never gossip.

Listen to what you are told, but do not repeat it.

If someone tells you something personal in confidence, keep it to yourself.

If someone tells you something they have heard, and they tell you to keep it to yourself, do so, and know that person is a gossip, cannot keep a secret, and should not be trusted in twrms of gossiping.

Never throw someone under the bus.

If you must say something about someone, make it a good word, always.

If this seems like part of a strategy, I suppose you can look at it that way.
That said, they all come out of respect for yourself and others, and the cultivation of positive energies.


Cheers,
Ian

acdc01
09-11-17, 11:45 AM
Getting your company's higher ups, bosses and coworkers to like you is just as important if not moreso than actually doing well at your job description.

TygerSan
09-11-17, 02:46 PM
If you are ever in a situation that is toxic or a bad fit, don't be afraid to at least consider other options.

I still remember the point at which I should have left my old career. I was told that if something wasn't successful, we would all be pushing grocery carts at the supermarket. My honest reaction was: you know? That sounds pretty good right now.

Now I'm doing something that pays far less money and uses little of my education but is far more rewarding. I don't regret anything.

midnightstar
09-11-17, 04:09 PM
Don't wear yourself out doing everything or suck up to your boss, you don't want the reputation of being a buttkisser.

Unmanagable
09-11-17, 05:42 PM
Don't try too hard to be something you're not to please others, even bosses...for the real you will continually surface wondering wtf you're doing...and your body will continually suffer from various "symptoms" of your working so hard to suppress your authenticity and emotions, etc. in hopes of keeping a position that's already making you miserable and stealing most of your life force.

Fuzzy12
09-11-17, 07:20 PM
If at all possible, love your job (or find a job you love). It will make everything a lot easier.

Abi
09-11-17, 10:02 PM
Ignore Fuzzy.

This kind of unrealistic thinking is the root of all misery.

Sorry Fuzzy , love you :)

anonymouslyadd
09-11-17, 10:09 PM
Keep sharing!

Greyhound1
09-11-17, 10:57 PM
Never leave a job on a bad note, don't burn any bridges.

Making relationships is the key to opening career doors and finding the best jobs. Good jobs generally aren't found in the want ads. Most are filled before the public was even aware. Networking with the right people is key.

finallyfound10
09-11-17, 11:47 PM
If you hate a job and have done all that you know to "fix" it, don't waste too much time getting out. Also, don't waste too much time trying to fix it- be realistic and brave.

I've stayed at several jobs too long and regret it very much.

Fuzzy12
09-12-17, 07:15 AM
Ignore Fuzzy.

This kind of unrealistic thinking is the root of all misery.

Sorry Fuzzy , love you :)


:lol::doh:

It's possible. You don't have to love all aspects of your job but the more you love the easier it gets!!

stef
09-12-17, 07:31 AM
Be kind; you just can't know what people might be going through in their lives outside of work.
Also (if you work in a larger place) don't get sucked into negativity and office politics that might be spread around by some "clique" of employees.

anonymouslyadd
09-12-17, 03:43 PM
Be kind; you just can't know what people might be going through in their lives outside of work.
Also (if you work in a larger place) don't get sucked into negativity and office politics that might be spread around by some "clique" of employees.
Great advice, Stef.

Chris Voss talks about never being mean to someone who can hurt you by doing nothing.

TheGreatKing
09-12-17, 06:20 PM
As hard as it is try not to use emotions when dealing with people or work circumstances always take a step back and evaluate you next step. use logic and facts not emotions.

Pilgrim
09-13-17, 07:40 AM
Work is a gift,

And if it was fun that's what they'd call it.

Just saying

anonymouslyadd
09-13-17, 03:57 PM
Be mindful of who you can trust.

anonymouslyadd
09-15-17, 10:42 PM
Learn what motivates, bothers and worries the boss.

anonymouslyadd
09-15-17, 10:47 PM
Remember that a "yes" answer is not a guarantee of delivery. People use the term loosely these days. Always look for "how" something will be done. That's what makes the "yes" matter.

Greyhound1
09-15-17, 11:24 PM
The most realistically way to get ahead is to work hard first and unfortunately also have to suck up and socialize with the bosses. Usually, with ample amounts of alcohol and laughter. You have to build a relationship spending time as a friend almost, whether you like them or not. That's the hard part for me.

Just my opinions from my own experience in the corporate world. I performed well at the hard work part. Just couldn't handle all the sucking-up, political socializing and BS. It's truly a game and the one's who play it the best get ahead. The hardest working and best performing are usually over looked if they don't play the game.

I've seen too many people promoted that weren't qualified or even particularly good at their current position. The one thing they had in common was they were very good at playing the game.

sarahsweets
09-16-17, 06:02 AM
Never tell anyone at work including your boss about your adhd.

anonymouslyadd
09-16-17, 12:48 PM
Never tell anyone at work including your boss about your adhd.
Why did I not think of this?!

finallyfound10
09-16-17, 11:24 PM
Do not become friends with anyone you work with on Facebook and do not date anyone you work with.

anonymouslyadd
09-25-17, 11:14 PM
Try to be a collaborator, someone who works well with others.

stef
09-26-17, 05:02 AM
The most realistically way to get ahead is to work hard first and unfortunately also have to suck up and socialize with the bosses. Usually, with ample amounts of alcohol and laughter. You have to build a relationship spending time as a friend almost, whether you like them or not. That's the hard part for me.

Just my opinions from my own experience in the corporate world. I performed well at the hard work part. Just couldn't handle all the sucking-up, political socializing and BS. It's truly a game and the one's who play it the best get ahead. The hardest working and best performing are usually over looked if they don't play the game.

I've seen too many people promoted that weren't qualified or even particularly good at their current position. The one thing they had in common was they were very good at playing the game.

I read this earlier and never had time to answer
That just really is so sad;
I've never worked in a kind of structure where this is possible (because as an assistant working for specific people, there is no "promotion" in the first place, except working for the higher up partners as you go along.)
I don't think that forced socializing with the bosses could ever end well.

Gypsy Willow
09-26-17, 05:29 PM
Don't tell anyone at work that you have AD(H)D.

anonymouslyadd
10-11-17, 09:26 PM
Remember that "yes" is nothing without how. Upper management can make promises all day long and never be able to fulfill them.

acdc01
10-11-17, 09:55 PM
I read this earlier and never had time to answer
That just really is so sad;
I've never worked in a kind of structure where this is possible (because as an assistant working for specific people, there is no "promotion" in the first place, except working for the higher up partners as you go along.)
I don't think that forced socializing with the bosses could ever end well.

Yes, that is really sad and unfortunately very true. Socializing is about fitting in and being one of the good Ole boys. That rarely ends well for many of us because our minds are literally different from them so can be so hard to fit in and be like everyone else.