View Full Version : Do you often ask yourself "why am i living"?


Emre22
09-12-17, 07:24 PM
I am asking this question to myself very often.I only can find weak answer and that answer is survival instinct.

userguide
09-12-17, 08:42 PM
What kind of answer would you like to hear ?
You said somewhere that your plan for life is having fun, so why not living for fun ? :)

peripatetic
09-12-17, 08:52 PM
More days than not, yes.

psychopathetic
09-12-17, 09:13 PM
yes :(

despite it all though, there sure are a lot of things I still like in life

daveddd
09-12-17, 09:27 PM
daily

Fuzzy12
09-12-17, 09:29 PM
All the time

Gypsy Willow
09-15-17, 12:14 PM
All the time for me, too.

midnightstar
09-15-17, 02:23 PM
Most of the time for me. I believe my reason for living is Ebony.

musicman64
09-15-17, 05:26 PM
I don't very often any more. When I was a teen and young adult I really dwelled on negativity and the morose. As an older person with children and grandchildren I find great joy.

acdc01
09-15-17, 10:54 PM
No. Death is a very scary thing to me. I block all thoughts of it out of my mind and "why am I living" is pretty much the same as why not be dead so no, no thoughts.

anonymouslyadd
09-15-17, 10:58 PM
Sometimes. It's more than I'd like to admit.

Abi
09-15-17, 11:44 PM
I used to, until I overcame the cognitive dissonance that was preventing me from admitting what I already subconsciously knew...

I HAVE NO REASON for living.

That was actually very liberating.

I am not being suicidal at all (and I'm certainly not advocating it), I'm just saying, there really isn't much worthwhile to live for for many of us especially if we don't have any strong passions or goals.

For example, I've personally never wanted kids/family. I'm not career, wealth, or social status oriented. Most of the things I enjoy are relatively mundane, cheap, and easily acquired.

Bleh, I'm ranting.

Hermus
09-16-17, 01:47 AM
Because I just am, and most days I am okay with that. I lean towards existentialism, which says that life has no inherent meaning, but that we are responsible for giving it meaning ourselves.

Hermus
09-16-17, 02:00 AM
I used to, until I overcame the cognitive dissonance that was preventing me from admitting what I already subconsciously knew...

I HAVE NO REASON for living.

That was actually very liberating.

I am not being suicidal at all (and I'm certainly not advocating it), I'm just saying, there really isn't much worthwhile to live for for many of us especially if we don't have any strong passions or goals.

For example, I've personally never wanted kids/family. I'm not career, wealth, or social status oriented. Most of the things I enjoy are relatively mundane, cheap, and easily acquired.

Bleh, I'm ranting.

Wow. That really sounds very enlightening. It sounds to me that being able to enjoy the small things in life, instead of needing to acquire power, money or fame in order to be happy makes life so much easier.

Kaia.S
09-16-17, 02:31 AM
I think the reason for living is to experience life. To the fullest. Not to keep myself 'save' in order to survive. Because i won't... the minute i was born i started my way to death. So holding on to life in fear of losing it, seems pointless?

Some spiritual teachings say that the reason for living is not to become anything, but to recognise the things we're not. I'm not the body, i'm not the mind. I'm part of God, creating my own reality. I find that very interesting. Life would be so much more fun if we all get to that realisation. And stop giving more weight to the negative, valuing positive and negative the same, they're just different flavors. Wouldn't that be great?!

acdc01
09-16-17, 03:50 AM
Wow. That really sounds very enlightening. It sounds to me that being able to enjoy the small things in life, instead of needing to acquire power, money or fame in order to be happy makes life so much easier.

Yeah, that's what I thought too when reading abis post. Seemed a really positive thing, being able to enjoy the small things in life. I don't need money or fame vut Unfortunately, I get bored with the small things fairly quickly.

Hermus
09-16-17, 05:53 AM
I think the reason for living is to experience life. To the fullest. Not to keep myself 'save' in order to survive. Because i won't... the minute i was born i started my way to death. So holding on to life in fear of losing it, seems pointless?

Some spiritual teachings say that the reason for living is not to become anything, but to recognise the things we're not. I'm not the body, i'm not the mind. I'm part of God, creating my own reality. I find that very interesting. Life would be so much more fun if we all get to that realisation. And stop giving more weight to the negative, valuing positive and negative the same, they're just different flavors. Wouldn't that be great?!

I have seen some very interesting talks on YouTube that more or less state the same. Unfortunately I'm not able to share them here, since I will get into conflict with some of the moderators for discussing religion.

Unmanagable
09-16-17, 08:41 AM
I more often seem to question why I'm still alive, yet choosing not to live.

Why was it I kept choosing death over life for most of my life?

Even though vibrant life options were readily available, if I'd only choose them, I couldn't yet see them because I'd been taught to overlook them to more easily feed my conditioned addictions.

Every choice is an exchange of energy within myself...I was severely draining my own life account, but remained convinced I *was* living fully.

A long strange trip, indeed.