View Full Version : ADHD temperaments do not experience "normal" emotions


mildadhd
09-30-17, 02:20 PM
I do not think infants born with more emotionally sensitive ADHD temperaments experience "early normal" emotions.

And that "early abnormal" emotional experiences partly due to being born with a more emotionally sensitive temperament can interfere with the early development of neocortical self regulation.







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mildadhd
09-30-17, 07:24 PM
I do not think infants who inherit more emotionally sensitive ADHD temperaments' experience "early normal" moods.





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mildadhd
09-30-17, 07:42 PM
When early normal bottom up brain development is impaired, early normal top down brain development is impaired?





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mildadhd
10-01-17, 12:38 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-QC4voqmRg&app=desktop

In this video Dr Barkley says moods are normal but the top down ability to regulate moods is not normal.

But if a infant child is born with a more emotionally sensitive pre ADHD temperament, then how could the infant child's early moods be normal?

The foundation of neocortical self regulation develops inthe first few years of life.

I think it is extremely important for primary caregivers etc, to recognize the more sensitive emotional temperament (and associated moods) in regards to possibly lessening severity of deficits of self regulation in early life.



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midnightstar
10-01-17, 12:45 PM
I'm confused, surely babies with ADHD can feel normal emotions, same as any other baby even if they don't recognise what the emotion is? :scratch:

mildadhd
10-01-17, 09:17 PM
I'm confused, surely babies with ADHD can feel normal emotions, same as any other baby even if they don't recognise what the emotion is? :scratch:

Thanks for discussing the topics with me.

Edit: All babies are born with the same 7 unconditioned emotional response systems.

I do not think the moods of the baby born with a ADHD emotionally hyperreactive temperament, would be the same as the moods of the baby born with a NT emotionally reactive temperament.



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midnightstar
10-02-17, 01:45 PM
Thanks for discussing the topics with me.

Edit: All babies are born with the same 7 unconditioned emotional response systems.

I do not think the moods of the baby born with a ADHD emotionally hyperreactive temperament, would be the same as the moods of the baby born with a NT emotionally reactive temperament.



M

Why wouldn't they be the same? Even if they can't understand their emotions surely they'd feel the same emotions as babies? Clean slate and all that?

(having trouble with the laptop so please don't answer with youtube videos to explain anything, can you explain in words for tonight please mild?)

Fuzzy12
10-02-17, 04:31 PM
In what way do you think their emotions and moods differ?

Even now as adulta I dont think that our emotions are fundamentally different. Its just that our ability to regulate them is different.

mildadhd
10-03-17, 12:59 AM
Infants born with ADHD temperaments are more sensitive to emotional stimuli.








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mildadhd
10-03-17, 05:36 PM
..Even now as adulta I dont think that our emotions are fundamentally different. Its just that our ability to regulate them is different.


From a top down adult perspective...

Anxiety appears to be most common top down ADHD co-morbidity.


But from a bottom up early childhood perspective...

ADHD appears to be the most common bottom up "subterranean" Anxiety Disorder co-morbidity.


Our brain functions mature from the bottom up.

Top down functions mature in a reciprocal relationship with bottom up functions.

Primary emotional behavior associated with bottom up emotional temperaments are easiest observed in the first couple years of life, before the top down complex functions and associated behavior mature.

More complex top down executive functions gain more control of our bottom up emotional temperaments as we mature.



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Little Missy
10-03-17, 06:33 PM
Infants born with ADHD temperaments are more sensitive to emotional stimuli.








M

Is there scientific proof of this?

Lunacie
10-03-17, 06:52 PM
I do not think infants born with more emotionally sensitive ADHD temperaments experience "early normal" emotions.

And that "early abnormal" emotional experiences partly due to being born with a more emotionally sensitive temperament can interfere with the early development of neocortical self regulation.



M

Babies born with hypersensitivity, or sensory processing disorder, don't always
develop ADHD. They may have Autism or another disorder. Or not quite reach
the threshold for any diagnosis.

The emotions they feel are not different than the emotions that neurotypical
people feel, they just have difficulty filtering any stimuli, including emotions,
and therefore feel them more intensely.

As far as the which came first issue: hypersensitivity or ADHD, the final
answer isn't in yet.

mildadhd
10-03-17, 07:59 PM
Is there scientific proof of this?

Starting deeply subcortical below the amygdala, in the midbrain..

The ventral tegmental area....is a group of neurons located close to the midline on the floor of the midbrain. The VTA is the origin of the dopaminergic cell bodies of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system and other dopamine pathways; it is widely implicated in the drug and natural reward circuitry of the brain. The VTA plays an important role in a number of processes, including cognition, motivation, orgasm,[2] and intense emotions relating to love, as well as several psychiatric disorders. Neurons in the VTA project to numerous areas of the brain, ranging from the prefrontal cortex to the caudal brainstem and several regions in between.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ventral_tegmental_area



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mildadhd
10-06-17, 05:13 PM
Babies born with hypersensitivity, or sensory processing disorder, don't always
develop ADHD. They may have Autism or another disorder. Or not quite reach
the threshold for any diagnosis.



I agree.

I think it is a good idea, to identify all emotional temperaments for all emotional disorders including ADHD .



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mildadhd
10-06-17, 05:43 PM
The emotions they feel are not different than the emotions that neurotypical
people feel, they just have difficulty filtering any stimuli, including emotions,
and therefore feel them more intensely.



What do you mean by "filtering", do you mean we lack emotional self regulation?

All people (with and without emotional disorders) have the same 7 primary unconditioned emotional response systems in general, like all people have the same cardiovascular systems in general.

A person who has severe ADHD would feel more intense mood swings than a person who has mild ADHD, etc.








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mildadhd
10-06-17, 05:59 PM
Everything being same in each case...except the level of impairment.

-would a person who has mild ADHD be more likely feel irritated?
-would a person who has moderate ADHD be more likely feel angry?
-would a person who has severe ADHD be more likely feel rage?




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Lunacie
10-06-17, 06:38 PM
What do you mean by "filtering", do you mean we lack emotional self regulation?

All people (with and without emotional disorders) have the same 7 primary unconditioned emotional response systems in general, like all people have the same cardiovascular systems in general.

A person who has severe ADHD would feel more intense mood swings than a person who has mild ADHD, etc.



M


None of the stimulus is any different for us than for other people, we lack the
the ability to filter through it all and focus on what we need to at the time.

All the feelings and information and stimuli dog-piles on us, overwhelming us,
making it all feel more and bigger and worse than it really is.

Lunacie
10-06-17, 06:41 PM
Everything being same in each case...except the level of impairment.

-would a person who has mild ADHD be more likely feel irritated?
-would a person who has moderate ADHD be more likely feel angry?
-would a person who has severe ADHD be more likely feel rage?




M

That may be part of the equation. From my experience with comorbid anxiety
disorder, pre-meds I was always on edge and ready to explode into anger or
rage.

sarahsweets
10-07-17, 06:16 AM
I have no idea if this is top down, bottom up, side to side or grapevine (;))

I was under enormous pressure pregnant with my son. We were both in college, I was 20 and had to learn to be grownups, live with each other, do all the grown up responsible stuff and also work and finish school. I got married in Sept when I was 20 and had my son when I was 6 days shy of 21 in Feb, after being married 5 months. I had to finish school a year late. It was overwhelming especially with two adhd parents and an adhd/bipolar mom. I believe that the amount of emotional stress I was under affected my son at least as a baby. He was collicky, fussy yet thankfully well above average IQ wise to the point of being dangerous which is why he was diagnosed with adhd so young.