View Full Version : ADD causing Depression?


Pigeon
07-01-05, 09:47 AM
I was diagnosed with depression 6 years ago. They bounced me from med to med, doc to doc. Nothing helped. Now I have a new doc who recognized my symptoms as ADD not depression. I always new I wasn't "sad". But even though they are treating my ADD they are still treating the depression. I am taking Lexipro with Ritalin LA.

Is it normal for ADD to cause depression, how do I know if I'm depressed or if it's just ADD? I'm seeing a therapist, but I've never had suicidal thoughts or even close. Does it hurt to take depression meds if you're not depressed? I don't want to be overmedicated. :confused:

I know they're professionals so I would never stop medication with out talking to them, but I wonder if I should bring it up, they both know I'm taking both meds, and they both agree I have ADD but don't want to stop the depression medication. I just want to be better, but I've never felt like I've been depressed. What to do?

Thanks for reading this even you are just as clueless as I am, lol. :faint:

--Pigeon

Nucking_Futs
07-01-05, 09:53 AM
Pigeon,

The last person to know I'm depressed is usually myself. :rolleyes: The wonders of the mind are boggling.

If your concerned about over medication speak with your therapist and ask a lot of questions. Such as

Am I taking Lexapro for depression or as part of my ADD tx.

What signs and symptoms of depression have you seen that cannot be linked to my ADD.

Would it be feasable to stop the Lexapro and see how I do for a while.

You'll never know until you ask.

Big hugs,
Cherity

Pigeon
07-01-05, 11:08 PM
Thanks for those, I'm writing down a bunch of stuff this week is my first visit with my new, new doc, haha that's funny :p anyway he's a specialist for medication regulation, haha that's funny too :p so maybe he can help answer my questions about different meds together. Primarily my new reg doc recognized ADD and put me on the Ritalin, and my therapist can't prescribe anything but didn't want me to stop depression meds just-in-case, so my old primary doc forwarded all the stuff to my new doc and all of it's going to this med guy :faint: whew. So anyway, thanks for the suggested questions, I'll be bringing them up to him.

--Pigeon

sometimes I can't keep up with what I write :foot: so hopefully he'll be able to keep up with me, lol you guys are great!

herekittykitty
07-02-05, 10:32 AM
Just a comment on depression. I was diagnosed with dysthymia, which is a kind of constant, low-grade depression. Like you, I don't feel particularly sad, nor do I ever consider suicide. In my case, it's kinda like being Eyeore in Winnie the Pooh. Just kinda melancholy, not really expecting things to get better, not having a lot of energy to improve my situation. To my therapist, that suggested dysthymia.

There is a range of depression symptoms, and it doesn't necessarily show up as being suicidal or even sad.

One way I could look at depression and ADD separately is this: my ADD symptoms are kinda constant. When my depression meds aren't working, I find myself thinking that this ADD means I'll lose my job, never find a nice guy, alienate my friends, etc.

When the depression meds are working, I'm still a slob, late for appointments, disorganized, running late and generally a mess--but it doesn't bother me at all! (g)

But definitely talk to your doc about both--you're right to not want to take meds that you don't need. Good luck to you!

Pigeon
07-02-05, 10:47 AM
In my case, it's kinda like being Eyeore in Winnie the Pooh. Just kinda melancholy, not really expecting things to get better, not having a lot of energy to improve my situation.

One way I could look at depression and ADD separately is this: my ADD symptoms are kinda constant. When my depression meds aren't working, I find myself thinking that this ADD means I'll lose my job, never find a nice guy, alienate my friends, etc.

When the depression meds are working, I'm still a slob, late for appointments, disorganized, running late and generally a mess--but it doesn't bother me at all!
Wow, thanks for all that. It was exactly what I was looking for. You explained it exaclty like what I'm feeling. I will be talking to the new med doc about it. But thanks for the great insight, it was a huge help!

--Pigeon

stormy monday
07-28-05, 05:37 PM
I think that there is a huge relationship between ADD and depression, but I have both so I might be biased!

The way I look at it is sort of like the nature/nuture thing:
I have a chemical tendancy to be depressed - nature. Whether or not I actually get depressed is more situational and circumstantial - nurture. Because I grew up with undiagnosed ADD, I was always told that I was an underachiever, needed to try harder, etc. etc.

That turns into the "perfect storm" where the depression chases the ADD which chases the depression which chases the ADD . . . you get the idea . . . I think it was a really vicious cycle for me for a long time.

I've taken various anti-depressants for many years, with various success. Now that I have the ADD piece of the puzzle (I was recently diagnosed), it puts the depression into a whole different context for me.

It's almost like wearing a pair of blue-colored sunglasses (being depressed all my life) and not knowing it until I took them off (getting ADD diagnosis).

I just started taking a different anti-depressant and am going to start trying dexedrine over the weekend to see what effect that has. I'm keeping my fingers crossed!

Pigeon
07-28-05, 06:01 PM
Hey, I know what you mean...

I know now I was depressed but it was because of my ADD, and they took me off my anti-depressent a few weeks after taking Ritalin LA. I've said it before, but it's how I felt.... For me I felt like this whole time they were treating a broken leg (ADD) with a bandaide (ADs). Because now that the ADD is under control I no longer feel depressed either. I always knew soemthing wasn't right but I also knew it wasn't "depression" because the meds alone never helped.... these forums are a great help though thanks to all who participate. :D

Crystal

sin nombre
07-28-05, 09:20 PM
When it was un-dxed, ADD was responsible for a lot of my depression, I'm sure. But I also have major depressive disorder (or whatever it's called), and cyclothemia is suspected as well.

Nearly everything I've read has mentioned that depression and ADD have a very high comorbidity rate.

Pigeon
07-28-05, 09:27 PM
yeah a lot of my readings also, I think I have worked through my depressiveness (for now, lol) because for me it wasn't the neurological depression... I sometimes get down about ADD, but nowhere near like before because before I felt "lazy, stupid, and crazy" and now that I understand it better I am a happier person all around. Plus being treated for chronic fatigue really upps my mood too...

scuro
07-28-05, 09:31 PM
Barkley on Depression and ADHD.

"The evidence for the co-occurrence of mood disorders, such as major depression or dysthymia (a milder form of depression), with ADHD is now fairly substantial (see Faraone & Biederman, 1997; Jensen, Martin, & Cantwell, 1997; Spencer, Wilens, Biederman, Wozniak & Crawford, 2000 for reviews). Between 15 and 75% of those with ADHD may have a mood disorder, though most studies place the association between 20 and 30% (Biederman et al., 1992; Cuffe et al, 2001; Fischer et al., in press). The odds of having depression given the presence of ADHD in general population samples is 5.5 (95% CI 3.5-8.4)(Angold et al., 1999). Some evidence also suggests that these disorders may be related to each other in that familial risk for one disorder substantially increases the risk for the other (Biederman et al., 1991, 1992; Faraone & Biederman, 1997), particularly where ADHD is comorbid with CD. Similarly, a recent follow-up study (Fischer et al., in press) found a 26 percent risk of major depression among ADHD children by young adulthood but this risk was largely mediated by the co-occurrence of CD. Likewise, a meta-analysis of general population studies indicated that the link between ADHD and depression was entirely mediated by the linkage of both disorders to CD (Angold et al., 1999). In the absence of CD, ADHD was not more likely to be associated with depression".

The link ->http://www.continuingedcourses.net/active/courses/course003.php

Pigeon
07-28-05, 09:59 PM
I understand all that, and the statistics are nice, thank you... I'm really interested in the science behind it all I guess... :rolleyes: is depression and ADD linked because the brain chemicals are similar? or because they have similar symptoms? or because having ADD makes you depressed? (I think this is my case, personally) but who knows it could just be that the same part of the brain is affected... I'm a knowledge seeker, lol... I wanna know why this is, hehe... I'm a student for life :rolleyes:

Joyous56
08-21-05, 02:11 PM
Hey Pidgeon...and Kittykitty. I've been thinking a lot about this relationship myself.

I too was diagnosed with dysthymia about 15 years ago...prior to that, simply being miserable and working really, really hard to figure out what was 'wrong' with me by buying every self help book available and following the suggestions. Lots of meds later...I found that even when a particular med worked, I still had trouble with concentration, motivation, procrastination, organization.... and this in itself was depressing! But I think I realized it was situational...related to not being 'together' enough to set goals and work toward accomplishing them.

Now that I've been diagnosed with ADD (inattentive it seems), I'm working through the med trial-and-error....which, as you may know, carries it's own craziness (Strattera caused insomnia and depression, Ritalin is better, but I can't seem yet to manage the dosage and timing...today I am twitchy and tired because I haven't slept well).

My understanding is that depression is caused by a decrease in the presence of one or more neurotransmitters in the brain. That's why the meds that increase the availablity of neurotransmitter(s) are effective; it's often a question of which neurotransmiter is in short supply (serotonin, epinephrine, norepinephrin, dopamine - most often it seems to be serotonin that is lacking). My personal theory here is that 'messages' about pleasurable things simply don't get through. To me, life seemed a chore, a long list of tasks, events, and things to get through...with no pleasure from any of them. I told a friend of mine once that althoug I cared about her and enjoyed her company (as best I could)...in fact, when we would see each other again after a time, I knew I should be happy, and I knew enough to act happy, in reality, the sight of her registered nothing but recognition in my brain; I did not connect that with pleasurable memories, or anticipation of a good time. There was just not that much 'good stuff' getting transmitted in my brain!

ADD also seems to be due to a shortage of neurotransmitters; there is not enough to effectively transmit 'messages' between neurons, so these messages sometimes don't get to where they need to be to generate the appropriate action.....the memory, the need to act, the thought......the attention!

I admit I'm theorizing here...and it's my personal experience....but it's as if my mind is constantly searching around for something that 'stands out' and catches my attention. Like trying to tune the radio when you're traveling out in the boonies. It's hard enough to find a station, and even when you do, it gets static or fades away when you go over the next mountain.

At work, I do most things at the last minute; it's as if the threat of not making the deadline 'catches my attention' and I can focus. At school, years ago, it was the same way; I couldn't study for an exam until 3am the night before; the 'threat of failure' allowed me to focus on the goal of studying to pass the exam.

I am really good at spotting wildlife when I'm driving in the country; my friends wonder how I do it; it 'catches my attention', because it stands out as something interesting. I don't do high-risk sports, but I like to 'explore'...a new route home, the internet (when I should be working) because I don't know what to expect...new sights, new thoughts....the idea that I need to pay attention to...find my way, to see the sites....to avoid problems...keeps my attention.

I'm sorry...I'm rambling. These are my thoughts.

Miykael
08-30-05, 05:27 PM
I was on anti-depressants and anti-anxiety medication from the ages of 14 to 28 almost constantly and It appears my problem is definately ADD. I am not seeing a doctor currently and have had a lot of probs from meds I was on. So I am a bit weary of meds and doctors, but I might consider taking one for ADD because nothing seems to work. I feel totally useless these days. No motivation, no concentration, lots of procrastination.

reBuilder
02-12-06, 08:37 AM
I am a long time drug-resistant MDD (major depressive disorder). It started slowly about 12 years ago and 6 years ago my wife finally got me to seek help. Each year would be worst than the last. I have tried about 18 different drugs and nothing has worked. Welbutrin may help just a little so I've kept taking that one. I've even had a series of ECT treatments that only made me feel worse. I have had several suicide attempts but always back out at the last minute.

I was just recently diagnosed with Inattentive ADD after suspecting it for several years. I always disregarded it because I thought that was only for hyperactive people. After reading the symptoms of other forum members I could easily be the poster child for Inattentive ADD.

I just started Ritalin about 17 days ago and it is the first drug that has actually helped my depression. I'm still taking Welbutrin which does nothing by itself but may be enhanced by the combo? Ritalin doesn't do a lot for motivation but I can zero in on tasks and more importantly I'm not a vegetable with the constant cycling of negative thoughts going on. I've had some trouble with the right dosage but I think I've got that worked out now. I am very excited to have some hope once again!

Back to the original topic. I think that maybe the ADD either caused my depression or was at least a major component. I'm trying to gather info on other treatment-resistant depressives who have Inattentive ADD to see if there is a trend.

nikki
02-12-06, 11:33 AM
Before I was diagnosed with ADD, I was on antidepressants. At one point I told my doctor, I still had a horrible memory (something she attributed to depression) and wasn't getting anything done, but I didn't care anymore. It wasn't upsetting me like it had before. In that regard, the depression had lifted but the ADD symptoms suddenly were very clear....antidepressants did not "help" relieve them, thus it was finally diagnosed for me.

That's when she started me on ADD meds, and weaned me off the antidepressants. You can't just stop antidepressants at once...I think it was a 3 week process of lower doses until I was done with them.

I guess it depends on your situation. I do notice, without the antidepressants, I'm not as even as I was, but for me, that's not worth going back on them. For the most part, I'm very calm and relaxed on only the ADD meds.

mctavish23
02-12-06, 02:15 PM
I've got Russ Barkley's Powe Points on my computer at work.

What Scuro posted is all about the science behind it.

One of the things that's included on the Power Points is a mention of a genetic link between ADHD and depression.

Anecdotally, in treating children w/ADHD, it's very easy for them to become depressed over time, as their own best efforts,either academically or perhaps socially, don't pay off .

I know that certainly was the case with me, even though it was a number of years before I was dx'd.

When you get a chance, please check out the Biogenic Amine Hypothesis,as I think it addresses most of what you're looking for.

At least I hope so anyway.

tcmctavish23 (Robert)

barbyma
02-12-06, 04:05 PM
When considering the connection between disorders (particularly causal), there are a few factors that can't be ignored.

-- There are several types of neurotransmitters at work in the brain, all swimming around in there and interacting with one another through complex neural connections. The levels of one are unlikely to be completely unaffected by they levels of another.

-- Genetic influences are not always simple. Since it appears that the prevalence of both ADHD and Depression seem to be influenced by a number of genes and/or alelles, the high comorbidity that exists shouldn't be either a surprise or expected. It's a crap shoot.

-- The environment of people with disorders is affected by the behavior of the individual. That environment, in turn, affects the brain chemistry of the individual. It's a reciprocal relationship that never ends.

To answer the question if ADD is known to cause depression, it is never possible to determine causal relationships between variables that can't be manipulated and randomly assigned. Meaning, I can't "assign" you to have ADD, so I can't determine if it causes anything.....

scuro
02-12-06, 05:08 PM
More from Barkley and his SF 2000 lecture.

ADHD and Comorbid disorders.

Major depression is quite common, around 27 percent. In my follow-up study the statistics from other studies place it between 25 and 30 percent. Why the overlap? Itís real. If thereís depression in your family, thereíll be AD/HD. If thereís AD/HD in your family, thereíll be depression. The two disorders tend to go together. Why? They seem to share an underlying genetic vulnerability. The genes for one disorder are probably contributing to the genes for the other disorder, and that is why they tend to run in families.

So consequently, you see those two going together. But why then donít all AD/HD children get depression? Because depression is an interesting disorder. The genetics create vulnerability to depression. It requires exposure to environmental traumatic events and then you are more likely to get depressed than someone else would, but absent the environmental, social, turmoil, trauma disruption, youíre not going to get depressed, even though you are vulnerable to depression. Depression requires two causes: the genetic vulnerability and the environmental disruption. And now you know something that researchers only recently discovered, which is why AD/HD, when it goes with depression, is also associated with Conduct Disorder. Because Conduct Disorder is highly associated with social turmoil, family disruption, and adversity in your life. Broken homes, divorces, multiple moves, low social class, exposure to environmental and physical traumaóboth of these disorders will tend to occur where there is environmental adversity in the life of the individual. And now you know why. The vulnerability to depression is brought out by the social adversity and the social adversity sets the stage for the development of Conduct Disorder as well.

barbyma
02-12-06, 06:10 PM
More from Barkley and his SF 2000 lecture.

ADHD and Comorbid disorders.
Barkley makes a lot of leaps with these statements, and it's not the first time I've read his words and thought he was a bit over-confident. But, his explanations and reasonings are pretty clear and based on solid research even if they go beyond the research in conclusions.

mctavish23
02-14-06, 01:02 AM
Barb,

I had the same thought as I read that;even tho I've seen/read that qoute before.

addinbc
02-14-06, 05:57 AM
Hey, I know what you mean...

I know now I was depressed but it was because of my ADD, and they took me off my anti-depressent a few weeks after taking Ritalin LA. I've said it before, but it's how I felt.... For me I felt like this whole time they were treating a broken leg (ADD) with a bandaide (ADs). Because now that the ADD is under control I no longer feel depressed either. I always knew soemthing wasn't right but I also knew it wasn't "depression" because the meds alone never helped....

Crystal
Hi Crystal;

You are bang on with this one! Wow, how I can relate to this!!!

Now the trick is trying to convince doctors and friends of this!...:faint: :eyebrow: I sometimes wish this wasn't such an invisible disorder, so I could go, "see, look it's here" (point to the problem). No doubts, no blaming, just understanding, and a real attempt to find the most effective treatment.

*sigh*!!

WINDUP
02-16-06, 02:53 AM
It is the greatest myth ever propogated that neurotransmitter imbalances are the cause of depression. Loada crap. The imbalances are a *symptom* of depression. Researchers don't really know what the root cause of depression is. Here's a tip - whenever someone starts talking about multiapproaches or various factors is means they don't really know. In social sciences especially, there are very few if any known 'laws'.

Here's an anticynical thought - neurotransmitter manipulation treats symptoms. Most depression will resolve on it's own if left untreated. Just remember that between -10000BC and circa 1900AD mankind has existed without antidepressants.

ADHD people grow up with failure and poor self esteem. The impulsivity and the concurrent failures elevate risk of secondary depression. So yes - a bandaide for a broken leg is a good analogy. Finally physicans are starting to realise that you should treat the Attention Deficit itself rather than hit secondary problems - rocket science really.

I recall as a kid one doc I spoke with wanted me to change my behavior first and then he would write a prescription. I ended up dropping outta school and moving interstate. I told another doc about this a couple years back and he was like "yes 10 or 15 years ago we were trained to build structure first and then prescribe... nowdays we know...". Bah! So called experts!

Oh and one last comment - stims ARE ANTIDEPRESSANTS! (Did I hear a pin drop in the background?) What a bombshell eh? Remember when cocaine first came out last century. Not that I was alive back then but anyway... they were selling it as the panacea for just about everything. They even put it in soft drinks! Next time a doc suggests you need more than one drug you might want to query if your problem goes beyond dopamine?!

WINDUP
02-16-06, 02:59 AM
Hi Crystal;

Now the trick is trying to convince doctors and friends of this!...:faint: :eyebrow: I sometimes wish this wasn't such an invisible disorder, so I could go, "see, look it's here" (point to the problem). No doubts, no blaming, just understanding, and a real attempt to find the most effective treatment.

*sigh*!!
Yeah I hear ya. Don't despair - there is now QEEG techniques and brain imaging etc. I get the same s**t from other people especially my family who think I just have ficticious disorder. I think a PET scan is the way to go. I'm now trying to figure out if these other people are just in denial or just plain retarded.

Joyous56
02-16-06, 11:35 PM
It is the greatest myth ever propogated that neurotransmitter imbalances are the cause of depression. Loada crap. The imbalances are a *symptom* of depression. Researchers don't really know what the root cause of depression is.

Oh and one last comment - stims ARE ANTIDEPRESSANTS! (Did I hear a pin drop in the background?) What a bombshell eh? Remember when cocaine first came out last century. Not that I was alive back then but anyway... they were selling it as the panacea for just about everything. They even put it in soft drinks! Next time a doc suggests you need more than one drug you might want to query if your problem goes beyond dopamine?!

Please be careful Windup. Your statements are a bit inflammatory; you are welcome to express your opinions, but please do so without insulting those who believe differently than you.

In fact, there is sufficient scientific evidence to contradict the statements you have made, however this is not a debate.

barbyma
02-16-06, 11:48 PM
WINDUP,

You are welcome to join the debates forum if you'd like to discuss this.

I've got reams of citations to back up the inaccuracy of your statements and I'd be happy to share them.

mctavish23
02-17-06, 01:03 AM
No oe ever said that medicine/psychiatry or psychology were exact sciences; hence the use of "hypothesis."

There's no cure for the common cold nor is there lab test for bipolar;yet we know that they exist.

SHOW ME where I said otherwise and I 'll retract it.

WINDUP
02-17-06, 02:39 AM
Are you all saying that neurotransmitter inbalances are the cause of depression?
You've lost me? This is the standpoint that I was rebutting. Is that ok with you?

I did social sciences at uni and the above point was made very clear to me by some of the best and brightest. These are subtle points and I would have thought they'd be appreciated in here.

Yes - there is ample evidence that depression leads to neurotranmitter upsets which sparks all kinds depressive troubles - like the neurovegetative symptoms in particular. As far as I am aware there is no evidence suggesting that neurotransmitter inbalances are the root cause of depression. The best evidence I have ever come across cites it as but one factor. It's also very true that dopamine agonists are antidepressant in their action. I'm not quite sure what evidence or citations you are referring too? Perhaps you could enlighten us?

To those who claim they don't like the tone of my posts - well I do not mean to offend but if you're offended by my divergent opinion then that's your problem. I'd also stress that my opinions are quite mainstream and not that unique. But I appreciate the compliment.

barbyma
02-17-06, 03:20 AM
Is that ok with you?
It's perfectly fine. If you'd like to debate it, we have a debates section that allows slightly less restrictive etiquette than the general forums.

Yes - there is ample evidence that depression leads to neurotranmitter upsets which sparks all kinds depressive troubles - like the neurovegetative symptoms in particular. As far as I am aware there is no evidence suggesting that neurotransmitter inbalances are the root cause of depression.
There is no more evidence that depression leads to neurotransmitter upsets than there is that neurotransmitter imbalances cause depression.

Cause cannot be concluded from any study of neurotransmitters because this is not a variable that can be manipulated, so true experiments cannot be done.

There is, however, a great deal of evidence that supports that imbalances occur before depression, not after, which falsifies your hypothesis that depression leads to this imbalance.

Despite the limitation that experiments cannot be conducted, convergence of evidence is HIGHLY suggestive of a causal relationship.



To those who claim they don't like the tone of my posts - well I do not mean to offend but if you're offended by my divergent opinion then that's your problem. I'd also stress that my opinions are quite mainstream and not that unique. But I appreciate the compliment.
First, according to the guidelines, all opinions are welcome, but our requests that you support your opinion with citations is also appropriate, especially when the opinion runs counter to the accepted view (accepted by the mental health community) that is supported by mountains of research.

Your tone is the problem, not your opinion. In the general forum, which is designed for support, it's not welcomed. If you move into the debate forum, you'll find it a little more tolerant.

BTW, the opinion you've expressed here certainly isn't rare, but I'd hardly call it "mainstream."

WINDUP
02-17-06, 04:10 AM
Well actually we must be reading from different journals then. I'm just saying that according to reputable subject matter experts the issue is not one of "evidence or citations". The issue is purely theoretical. I agree with your point that correlation does not equate to causality. No argument here.

If we can at least agree that neuro-imbalances preceed diagnosis then what's to say what the heck precipitates the imbalance. The end result is clinical depression is it not? I mean what is the diathetic event to cause the imbalance? Is there just one factor involved? The causality here is all fuzzy - but if you're right then you've already conceeded that neuroimbalance is but one of the many processes in depressive illness and not the cause? We are talking about the initial cause are we not?

The reason I posted my comment is because so many 'so-called' mental health experts and the media propogate the myth that neuroimbalance causes depression. Therefore correct the problem and buy this product or take this treatments and viola!

I really hate unpeerreviewed web stuff but there is plenty out there if you must triangulate my logic:

"Clinical Depression is often said to be caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain, and this is what most drug treatments are based on. Certainly in many cases, there is a reduction in the amount of certain neurotransmitters found (monoamines such as serotonin and norepinephrine) in depressed people.
However, low serotonin levels are simply another symtom of depression, not a cause. The more negative introspection you carry out, and the fewer pleasure-giving activities you participate in, the lower your serotonin levels become" From http://www.clinical-depression.co.uk/Depression_Information/causes2.htm


"The Truth is that nobody in the medical field really knows if a "biochemical (http://www.antidepressantsfacts.com/myth-of-biological-depression.htm) imbalance (http://www.antidepressantsfacts.com/blaming-the-brain.htm)" is the cause of any mental disorder, and they do not know how even the hypothesized "biochemical imbalances" could produce the emotional, cognitive, and behavioural symptoms that characterize any mental disorder." From http://www.antidepressantsfacts.com/introduction.htm


"Many professional and lay people today think depression
can be caused by "chemical imbalance" in the brain even though
none of the "chemical imbalance" theories of depression have been
verified. Some of them are discussed by Dr. Andreasen in her
book..." http://www.antipsychiatry.org/depressi.htm


I do not think it is necessary for me to make any further comment in this thread.

middle8
02-18-06, 01:44 AM
I've suffered a couple of major depressive episodes, which I did feel to be partly related to ADD-related "scatter", hyperfocus (on my dysphoria and sad events), and underachievement. SSRI's were somewhat effective, but made me irritable.

I've been on Dexedrine (5 mg BID; first time with a psychostimulant; often skip or halve doses) for a couple of weeks, and have found it to be a very good mood stabilizer, antidepressant, and anxiolytic. I also sleep better at night for some reason (using up free-floating energy and attention during the day?).

So, I don't know what the biochemical linkage between depression and ADD is in my case, but it does appear (so far) that treating the ADD also treats the depression.

sloppitty-sue
02-20-06, 01:18 PM
I also feel that if I can convince my prescriber (or some other prescriber) to prescribe me an increased dosage of my Adderall (or some other amphetamine) that we would never have to talk about "my depression" again!

Currently I'm prescribed AdderallXR 20mg in the a.m. AND - after much deliberation on her part, my prescriber (a psychiatric nurse - the only "prescribing shrink" in the facility where I go to counseling) agreed to also write me a prescription for a 10mg AdderallIR in the afternoon. Now somedays, this is alright. But I have days - maybe like 5 or 6 a month - that I feel as if I need 4 10mg AdderallIR in the p.m. I DID actually take that one time when I HAD to do something in the afternoon and my whole body - AND BRAIN - felt like heavy lead!!! I DID feel able to function after that. I just wish I could have the peace of mind to know that I can take more, if needed, and not be left short until the next prescription.

And I really KNOW that I will not keep going UP AND UP AND UP!!! I DO have a limit! I just am FAR from my needed dose right now. I feel like I need at least 60 mg per day, but my nurse (without me even saying how MUCH more I felt I needed) already feels SO NERVOUS and hesitant about giving me the 20mg XR in am and 10mgIR in pm. She thinks thats a "HIGH DOSE"! Any suggestions? I'm pretty upset that I have to deal so carefully with getting care for MY HEALTH!! I know that I have NEVER been able to GET someone to prescribe a stimulant to me until THIS nurse, so I don't want to lose HER favor and possibly NEVER be prescribed ANY stimulant medication again. Ya know?

It's a dilemma.

Sue

MrsBubblebrain
03-06-06, 02:56 AM
I came off adderall and haven't tried anything else. I also have high blood pressure.

I have tried just about every anti dep. Am another 'Eyore' although being diagnosed as ADD has explained a lot.

I constantly feel overwhelmed and anxious, as well as a failiure and often totally demotivated. Lets face it, who would thrive feeling like that????

So I feel that as I get to grips with certain aspects of ADD, things will improve a bit.

Going back to the adderall, they wound up upping and upping the dose. I did have ONE week though in the middle of it all where I suddenly felt like the person I 'should/could' be. Then I got PMS and it all slid sideways again and I never got back to that feeling.

reBuilder
03-06-06, 03:23 PM
I have tried just about every anti dep. Am another 'Eyore' although being diagnosed as ADD has explained a lot.

I constantly feel overwhelmed and anxious, as well as a failiure and often totally demotivated. Lets face it, who would thrive feeling like that????


MrsBubblebrain,

I know exactly how you feel. That has been the neatest thing about these forums that some folks descibe exactly how I feel.
I've only been on ADD meds for 6 weeks and have come to conclusion that it will not fix my deep drug-resistant depression. However, it does seem to elevate me past the vegetative state I was in. I am no longer dwelling on negative thoughts as much. ("I'm an idiot", "Wish I were dead", "I'm a loser" etc) I'm still not motivated but at least I'm somewhat content doing nothing now. That may be the foundation for other drugs and/or cognitive therapy.
I was on Ritalin but after one month I decided to try Aderrall. I'm at 15mg right now but anything more at this point seems to make me sleepy. I may go back to Ritalin.
Also, I too think that the diagnosis has been very helpful in helping me cope. I can't blame ADD yet for the depression but it sure explains a lot of the things that I felt bad about and takes some of the guilt off my shoulders.