View Full Version : spatial dislocation of sound


speedo
07-02-05, 08:12 PM
I have hypersensitivities. One of the things associated with my hypersensitivity to sound is spatial dislocation. Sounds seem to come from the wrong places much of the time.

I have attribuited it to my tinnitus, but I'm not so sure of that.


Is there anyubody esle out there having spatial dislocation of sound ?


ME :D

Wheezie
07-05-05, 12:07 AM
i have this when i'm trying to figure out where the noise in my car is coming from. i'll say it sounds like the right rear wheel is flat and it'll be the front left.... stuff like that.

i can't think of another example, but, i'm glad the fireworks only come once a year. next year i'll need to try to remember ear plugs!

speedo
07-05-05, 02:42 AM
I have been able to get by without earplugs most of the time for the last few weeks. I think the big reason is that I'm beginning to learn to tolerate some sounds better and have new coping mechanisms.

However, I am having an increase in the number of hearing problems that I am experiencing. :eek:

I did go out last night (with friends) and watched the fireworks at the mall area of the capitol from the roof of a friends house. I enjoyed it. There were a lot of peole setting of fireworks in the area, but I was able to tolerate the racket rather well, so I am proud of myself. :)

I'm a little concerned that the worsening sound effects that I am having is indicating meniere's disease. I'm also having a lot more difficulty in conversations with people. I guess I'll have to wait on the audiologists test in two months to find out if the hearing loss is actually continuing to worsen. I guess I am worrying too much about it, but my whole life seems to have been centered around hearing issues in the last 6 months or so... I guess I could just lighten up a bit and take it as it comes.. :p

Me :D

ADDitives
09-20-05, 09:30 AM
yes. i like to think i'm pretty good at knowing where a sound is, but often i'm WAY off.

rcouchma
03-11-06, 01:52 AM
I have hypersensitivities. One of the things associated with my hypersensitivity to sound is spatial dislocation. Sounds seem to come from the wrong places much of the time.

I have attribuited it to my tinnitus, but I'm not so sure of that.


Is there anyubody esle out there having spatial dislocation of sound ?


ME :D

Just out of curiosity... do u know what's causing your tinnitus? I've had it for about 2 years now (I went to a loud bar one nite, and the next morning my ears were ringing really loudly)... (i'm 22) and I was diagnosed with ADD about 3 years ago. I was always terribly sensitive to noise when I was a kid (couldn't stand fireworks, etc)... does hypersensitivity to sounds play a role in tinnitus??? I've been to several specialists and none can explain why I'm getting it in both ears (my hearing is totally normal). I don't seem to have spatial dislocation of sound... Can anyone give me more information on hypersensitivities?

speedo
03-11-06, 09:17 AM
It turns out that I have an assymetrical hearing loss. I have lost most of the hearing in one ear and part of my hearing in the other ear. It is the type of hearing loss associated with damaged hearing due to loud noise. I have tinnitus too and it is attribuited to my hearing loss. Along with the tinnitus , I have hyperacusous, which is hypersensitivity to sound.

Tinnitus can be accompanied by one or more of the following: hyperacsous, vertigo, echoes, distorted hearing, spatital dislocation of sound. At one time or another, I have experienced all of those effects.

Tinnitus goes away spontaneously in about 1/3 of those who have it. In other cases it can get worse and eventually leave the victim functionally deaf.

Typically it is associatedwith hearing loss.

See your audiologist and ENT.

ME :D

speedo
03-11-06, 10:15 AM
Oh, you really should get your tinnitus checked out, because it can lead to things like depression and anxiety disorders. Furthermore, tinnitus can be na indicator that you may have meniere's disease, which can lead to total deafness.

In any case, as trivial as it may seem, ,,,,,,,don't ignore your tinnitus.

ME :D

Johnnny
05-24-07, 05:01 PM
I dont make a habit of reviving old threads but its the only one ive seen that talks about ears.

I always have a super small ringing in my ear, i dont notice it unless i think about it.

But ive noticed on the other hand that laptops, computers and TV will leave a ringing noise in my ear, and when i leave it goes away. Does that make sense? Can your ears my ears anyones ears be sensitive to electronic machines?

speedo
05-24-07, 05:10 PM
Many devices with CRT's (cathode ray tubes) employ a flyback transformer that is driven by the horizintal sweep circuitry at around 16 KHz. What you hear from the TV is the transformer (and other components) vibrating at 16 KHz in the form of a high pitched whine. Computer monitors employ a similar arrangement, but the frequency is variable and may or may not be audible to those who have sensitive ears.

LCD displays often have a cold cathode lamp that requires high voltage. The high voltage is developed by a DC-DC converter that has a built in oscillator at a rather high frequency. While it is unusual for these to make audible noises, it is possible that some might, especially if they are not working correctly.

Refrigerators are well-known for making a high pitched whine... lots of electical things make high pitched mechanical noises...


ME :D

I dont make a habit of reviving old threads but its the only one ive seen that talks about ears.

I always have a super small ringing in my ear, i dont notice it unless i think about it.

But ive noticed on the other hand that laptops, computers and TV will leave a ringing noise in my ear, and when i leave it goes away. Does that make sense? Can your ears my ears anyones ears be sensitive to electronic machines?

Crazygirl79
05-25-07, 08:18 PM
Speedo.

I know exactly where you're coming from and I've basically battled this my whole life. and it is a sensory integration issue.

Selena:) I have hypersensitivities. One of the things associated with my hypersensitivity to sound is spatial dislocation. Sounds seem to come from the wrong places much of the time.

I have attribuited it to my tinnitus, but I'm not so sure of that.


Is there anyubody esle out there having spatial dislocation of sound ?


ME :D

Johnnny
05-25-07, 11:15 PM
so is that very almost un noticble ringing in my ear a bad thing? Mabye a slight bit of tinnitus?

speedo
05-28-07, 06:18 PM
No, that is the natural "whine" of your central nervous system. Tinnitis is LOUD.. in some cases it is loud enough to leave an individual functionally deaf.

Tinnitis can be a tone or several tones, it can be a roaring or hissing noise, it can be a clicking noise.

It can be in one or both ears.

It can be severe enough to be distracting, even downringht maddending for some people.

It can sometimes start, stop, and start again for no apparent reason.

In some cases, it simply goes away, weeks, months or even years after it starts. Nobody knows why.

People who have severe tinnitis often have depression (30%) and a few people (1 in 50,000) have hyperacusous (a painful response to sound) along with tinnitis. The suicide rate for persons with severe tinnitis/hyperacusous is higher han that for the general population (I don't have numbers on that).

A few things that can accompany tinnitis are:

painful sensitivity to sound (hyperacusous)
vertigo and/or dizziness.
spatial dislocation of sound
hearing distorted sounds
hearing echoes
depression
anxiety
distractability
irritability


ME :D


so is that very almost un noticble ringing in my ear a bad thing? Mabye a slight bit of tinnitus?

blink
07-28-07, 04:36 AM
So I just got back from a going away party held at a bar. I hate going to places that are loud/noisy when I have to meet a lot of new people. Sounds are coming from all over, I can't focus on what anyone is saying without a huge struggle. I can't distinguish from close or far sounds. It can be debilitating, but I hide it well enough I suppose.
I have tinnitus off and on, tone that rises and falls, my whole life and it seems to come from nowhere.
I was wondering is there any add treatment/meds that address this issue?:confused:

speedo
07-28-07, 12:13 PM
Neurontin helps reduce my tinnitus and especially helps reduce hyperacousous. I've discovered that risperdal reduces anxiety and my tendency to have a flight-or-fight reaction to sound is reduced a lot. At present, I'm doing really well and other than getting reminders of my hypersensitivity from sounds in my environment I am doing just great.

Get your hearing checked. Hearing problems can cause lots of issues with hypersensitive people and treating the hearing problem can significantly reduce the negatie impact that one can experience with hypersensitivity to sound.

ME :D

QueensU_girl
07-28-07, 05:18 PM
Some people with LDs or ADHD can also have CAPD: Central Auditory Processing Disorder.

http://www.kidshealth.org/parent/medical/ears/central_auditory.html

It affects location and processing and filtering of sounds.

e.g.

hearing a voice against background noise;
or, sorting out competing words, sounds, voices.

I don't think i have it to a great extent, but I do find i can't properly listen to people over background TV or radio noise, particularly DJs or other Human Voices, etc.

NB IIRC, people with CAPD and other auditory processing or auditory memory (ADHD) disorders, will almost always have good results on standard hearing tests.

Their hearing (sensory function), per se, isn't the problem. The processing or the memory or the filtering is the problem. The neurological problem is further down the line.

speedo
07-28-07, 05:30 PM
My audiologist tested me for CAPD and I don't seem to have it.

In any case, when you have your hearing tested be sure to mention that you have sensory issues and the audiologist is likely to test you for CAPD just to be sure. It's a really good idea to get these things diagnosed as there is therapy to help overcome CAPD, but they can't know you have it if they don't test you for it... so have your hearing checked.

Me :D

blink
07-29-07, 02:03 PM
Thanks for the suggestions / information Speedo and Queensu. I have made an appointment and will be tested within the month. This sensory issue is tricky in that to a large extent how I hear is normal to me even if I'm distracted by it, so I never thought to bring it up before.

speedo
07-29-07, 02:34 PM
Let us know how it works out. Hopefully, all will be well and you won't have hearing loss or CAPD. :)

Me :D

strange&unusual
08-10-08, 09:35 PM
I have been able to get by without earplugs most of the time for the last few weeks. I think the big reason is that I'm beginning to learn to tolerate some sounds better and have new coping mechanisms.

However, I am having an increase in the number of hearing problems that I am experiencing. :eek:

I did go out last night (with friends) and watched the fireworks at the mall area of the capitol from the roof of a friends house. I enjoyed it. There were a lot of peole setting of fireworks in the area, but I was able to tolerate the racket rather well, so I am proud of myself. :)



I'm a little concerned that the worsening sound effects that I am having is indicating meniere's disease. I'm also having a lot more difficulty in conversations with people. I guess I'll have to wait on the audiologists test in two months to find out if the hearing loss is actually continuing to worsen. I guess I am worrying too much about it, but my whole life seems to have been centered around hearing issues in the last 6 months or so... I guess I could just lighten up a bit and take it as it comes.. :p

Me :D

I have menieres disease. I started exhibiting hearing loss, tinnitus, and spatial dislocation of sound before I suffered from vertigo.

Interestingly, I have no family history of the disease and it was when I was on long-term effexor when the symptoms started to show. I did not suffer from vertigo attacks until after I had ceased effexor.

My ENT surgeon treats five of us with an effexor/menieres connection.

speedo
08-10-08, 10:28 PM
Yes, I was checked for Meniere's disease when my hearing problems began. i don't have it. I hope all goes well for you.

For those who do not know: Tinnitis and hearing loss can be caused by meniere's disease.
which is an increse in inner ear fluid pressure leading to damage to and loss of the auditory nerve. It can affect either or both ears. It is a slow process and it can take years for a person to go totally deaf. People with meniere's disease experience episodic tinnintis, rotary vertigo attacks and hearing loss.

It can also be caused by an acoustic neuroma (a brain tummor ) growing on the auditory nerve which results in the eventual loss of that nerve to damage. It is usually treated with surgery or with the use of intense radiation from a gamma knife.

This is definitely something that you want to get checked out if you ever suddenly have hearing problems , tinnnitis or vertigo.



ME :D

talitha
01-05-09, 11:40 PM
Sounds seem to come from the wrong places much of the time.

happens to me all the time.