View Full Version : ADD In other countries...


Andrew
09-08-03, 09:59 AM
I know that ADD is more well known to the public in the US, and less so in the UK, as an example. I wonder how knowledgeable the medical community & the public are in other countries about ADD & other similar disorders?

How can we assist in educating them?

waywardclam
09-08-03, 12:43 PM
Canadians are very similar to the USA both in the incidence and knowledge about ADD, and may in fact be better at having government support for people who need help. We tend to have more social programs than you Americans. :D

On the other hand, we don't have as many huge, expensive universities and clinics and cutting edge people working on the problem, so sometimes our laws and practices are a year or three behind...

Also, we are more restrictive as to what kinds of drugs and supplements can be marketed.

Not sure about this, but I think that ADD drugs might be a lot cheaper up here. Almost every other kind of pharmaceutical is, due to government price controls that don't exist in the USA.

MegAtomic
01-12-04, 04:08 AM
Over here its resonably know. However only the name. Although there are a few organisations that specialise in it. Like Impuls (which is a sub organisation of the Dutch Brain org. focussing on ADHD) and Balans. which is the same but then focuses on Children with ADHD. Problem is the lack of focus on adults with ADHD. (Impulz is about the only one focusin gon it)

As to the drugs? the mentality is: "Well it's Holland. If you get diagnosed you can have it. For all the other drugs go visit a coffeeshop"

prumont
01-12-04, 04:46 AM
Australia is more like Canada than the US, especially in the area of social programs. But general knowledge amongst the public is probably lower. There is a growing professional awareness of the condition & many self help groups. Still a lot of focus on children - few seem to have joined the dots (ie. kids grow up to be adults!!!!)

xav
01-28-04, 05:12 PM
Hello,

For a point of view from France see my post on the for introductions and personnal stories.

noisyparrot
08-08-04, 03:15 PM
Here in Belgium it still is a bit: "adhd? you don't look and act adhd? surely only those very bouncy kids with behavioural problems have adhd? you must be joking...". ADHD a very accepted diagnosis for kids, but not for adults. There are few people around I can talk to about this, and even relatives are sceptical (even though some are that way themselves).
The professionals seem very happy to prescribe ritalin, and there isn't too much help available for non-drug management of the problem.

Kimalimah
08-10-04, 12:19 AM
We have been fortunate to have found knowledgable, motivated professionals to work with both for my children and myself. Not that I (we) haven't had to work to find them. In Bavaria, there seemed to a much higher awareness and willingness to work with ADD. In Cologne it's been more difficult, but we seem to have finally hit paydirt.

Germany is WAY behind when it comes to medications and even knowledge about medications. Up until this year I could only get Ritalin SR for my son. Concerta was finally approved, but is so expensive that it took me six months to find a doctor who was willing to prescribe it for me. Otherwise I would have had to pay for it myself (150 Euros). The crises in our medical insurance system contributes dramatically to these difficulties.

On the other hand, they do not prescibe lightly. Without involvement in some kind of therapy, I think it would be difficult to at least get started with medications. I must say, I agree with this philosophy. To me, medication is only an aid so that you can finally start working with the child.

We have found the school system here to be totally incapable of dealing with ADD kids. They fall through the cracks. There are not enough teachers and hugh classes and a total lack of information. I think that the school system needs to be revised from the ground up, but of course, the germans don't want to hear that from me :). We are putting our son in a private school this September, and are fighting with "social services" over who pays for it. Our assigned person also admitted that she "really doesn't know what ADD is" or "how to go about applying for assistance under these circumstances". Scary!

For myself (mom with ADD), I found a psychiatrist/psychologist team here in Cologne fairly quickly (took 6 months). The problem is with waiting lists for therapy. They are up to one year. That's why I'm thrilled to have found this forum. I will be telling everyone who cares to hear (both privately and professionally) about it because the more people who are informed and out there supporting each other, the better life will get for all of us struggling to find our places in this world.

Anyone who wants to know more about my experiences should feel free to write me. I could go on for days. Thanks for listening.

paulbf
08-10-04, 02:10 AM
I mentioned in another thread recently but will repeat here, an acquantance from Taiwan has been visiting the US yearly to get meds for her ADD inattentive son. He's in an international school there so gets opportunities for more attention. Otherwise it'd be straight to farmer/laborer school as school is VERY competitive there even at grade school level, they sort folks out with entrance exams. It's a good place, democracy, freedom & all that but not much room for individuality.

PS Taiwan is where the former govt of China retreated to when the communists took over. They were ruled by Japan for some time and have that influence as well.

As for how to assist in education, everybody learns English there so this forum ought to be perfectly accessible. I oughta recommend this forum to her.

frosty
09-29-04, 10:07 PM
Australia is good in big cities but if you are in the country your buggered alot of the family doctors know how to give the medication but don't know much about ADHD.

ryan1950
10-16-04, 12:01 PM
La Brae,
Mise on Eireann,
Adult from ireland, only getting started, diagnosed in U.K. earlier this year.
rural town southern region. doc. supervises meds only. services mainly for kids.
i am the oldest diagnosed male adult in ireland that is out about their ADHD.

secondprize
12-28-04, 04:00 PM
ADHD a very accepted diagnosis for kids, but not for adults.

Amen to that. Same over here, in Germany. I wonder why countries, like the UK or Germany, who have, compared to other countries, basically just as much medical knowledge and resources as "ADD-countries" (like the USA or Canada), yet still are more than 10 years behind. Sad really. It angers me.

Kimalimah, I'd like to get in touch with you, as I live only about an hour-ish from Cologne. Do I sense a ray of hope for me?

Ichpuchtli
05-01-05, 03:32 AM
In Australia people have heard of it but they all think the person who has it is a very angry and aggresive person therefor they try to avoid us when really we're not like that.

shydoc
08-10-05, 02:00 AM
Malaysia - not even a google search brings anything, only trace of information is for kids. The mention of ADD to my doctor brings a long sigh.

anamari
04-12-06, 11:33 PM
few researches, few psychologists/pediatric neuropsychiatrist that can give an add diagnosis and a couple of therapists whom, even they do not specialize on ad/hd , helped with my son-tho I know they can do it.

no special ed, school adjustments for add children ...

i spoke about it with some parents on parenting romanian forums and they told me that recently ritalin and strattera are used in the treatement of add. the most knowledgeable parents had autist children with co-morbid ad/hd ...

nothing about adult add-I am the only Romanian diagnosed as an adult with ad/hd that I know of, but I was diagnosed in US-lucky me...

I can help with information, and I hope that once I bring some order in my own life I'll be able to "sponsor" a romanian psychology student to specialize in ad/hd therapy and research...

tyco
04-24-06, 10:44 PM
Here in new zealand i feel the public sees it more as an excuse that i make up ( not all)
Generally there is an understanding about it ( try to forget it and just get on)

HeadMechanic
03-10-07, 03:22 PM
I spoke recently to a well psycologist in Portugal and he said ADD is a behavior problem, that is all. I also looked in Google and did not come up with anything except this one local teacherīs forum where she was joking about this new american label "ADD" to excuse children from doing their homework, not paying attention etc.

Imnapl
03-10-07, 03:36 PM
What can I say? Ignorance is not limited to one continent?

goughy
03-10-07, 11:11 PM
I would agree with the comments above about australia. I think there is still a stigma about it, but most of the community would just assume it is a childhood problem. I think a lot of the community is aware of it, but for the wrong reasons. There has been plenty of publicity over the last few years about what is believed to be the over prescription of adhd medications.

I also agree with the comments regarding small and large cities. I live in a city of almost 100k, and have to travel to my capitol city for medication. My family doctor is very progressive and incredibly helpful, but gp's cannot prescribe adhd medication in Queensland. I have to visit a psychiatrist (not even a psycologist can prescribe) in brisbane. Being over hte age of 18 he has to make an application to the health department to prescribe these for me. They designate a maximum amount he can prescribe for me. And he can only do so for 2 years after which he has to make another application. If he also dosen't give them regular reports on my progress (say 6 monthly) then they can pull his permission to prescribe.

If I was under 18 a paediatrition could give me the scripts with no problems.

And to a degree this is where I believe the problems in Australia will continue. It seems to be considered a childhood problem, even by our governments. As long as this persists it will always be more difficult for adults.

In my city there are a couple of psycologists who specialise in adhd (and other ld's) but generally not with adults. The one who help diagnose me was very helpful, but I was about the 2nd adult he had ever seen. My gp is fantastic. She researched things herself just so she knew more, even though there isn't much she can actually do for me. But our previous doctor (who my wife had been seeing for years) would have laughed both of us out of his office. And I don't think this is an uncommon problem here.

goughy
03-10-07, 11:11 PM
And I think I was rambling a bit there. Sorry!! :)

Ichpuchtli
03-11-07, 03:40 AM
Nah don't worry. I am brissi person. I have recently just given up hope becuase it is so much freaken effort. You do have to see a phycartrist. Not just a plain old shrink.

The main reason the public is scared of us is because of the ACA and TT on on rare occasions 60 Minutes.

iwantritalin
08-07-07, 07:02 AM
Here in Greece it is nearly unknown.Very few kids are treatet and the condition is never diadnosed in adults.It's impossible for them to get evidence-based treatment.
For kids the term "dyslexia" is often used for adhd.
It's treatment is in most cases carried out by logotherapists!

expattw
07-12-08, 06:57 PM
I mentioned in another thread recently but will repeat here, an acquantance from Taiwan has been visiting the US yearly to get meds for her ADD inattentive son. He's in an international school there so gets opportunities for more attention. Otherwise it'd be straight to farmer/laborer school as school is VERY competitive there even at grade school level, they sort folks out with entrance exams. It's a good place, democracy, freedom & all that but not much room for individuality.

PS Taiwan is where the former govt of China retreated to when the communists took over. They were ruled by Japan for some time and have that influence as well.

As for how to assist in education, everybody learns English there so this forum ought to be perfectly accessible. I oughta recommend this forum to her.
Do you know the status of ADHD meds in Taiwan presently (Children or adult)?

Thanks expattw

PS: or perhaps nearby singapore (to taiwan)