View Full Version : hypnosis cd for add?


newdawn
08-07-05, 12:10 PM
Good Morning.
Has anyone here used hypnosis or hypnosis cd's for add? I'd be interested in hearing all linput. THanks

scuro
08-07-05, 01:27 PM
Good Morning.
Has anyone here used hypnosis or hypnosis cd's for add? I'd be interested in hearing all linput. THanks


Nope never heard of anyone using it and have only heard it mentioned as one of several quack remedies.

QueensU_girl
01-26-06, 12:30 AM
What is hypnosis supposed to do for ADD?

I am aware of hypnosis being used for anxiety, bad habits, for childbirth, etc. I have not heard of it being used/useful in ADD. (It could be useful in the other conditions that often *accompany* ADD, such as Anxiety.)

Do you mean MEDITATION? (eg the concept of 'mindfulness', such as is done in Yoga)

With Meditation, and i *think* in Hypnosis, people's brainwave patterns change. (And ADDers who get qEEG testing do appear to have different brainwaves when compared to others undergoing the same activities at the same time.)


Emma

NB. qEEG = quantitative EEG.

barbyma
01-26-06, 01:57 AM
According to McTavish23, who's done the research, hypnosis does nothing for ADHD symptoms.

What I know: hypnosis is great for pain relief (childbirth, even surgery), asthma, blood pressure, etc. It's NOT effective for addictions, diet, or memory.

mctavish23
01-28-06, 09:30 PM
The University of Minnesota has an excellent Clinical Hypnosis Symposium that I attended some years back.

Hypnosis has some excellent clinical applications,however, it doesn't work on ADHD.

As a general rule of thumb, I use a Brief Deep Muscle Relaxation Training Excercise with Guided Visual Imagery + Cognitive-Behavioral Thought Stopping Techniques.

The caveat is that I don't use it on hyperactive kids to make them less "hyper."

I do use it on kids with anxiety or sleep problems and (anecdotally) I get very positive feedback.

VickiS
01-31-06, 12:18 PM
Hmm..
Well of course if the studies are trying to prove that hypnotism “cures” ADD or it’s symptoms they are going to come up empty handed.
I have absolutely no medical background, but I have messed around with hypnotism myself, both with tapes and with a MD. I’ve always felt that my ADD made it easier for me to respond to the suggestions made.
I think most agree that ADDer’s have a tougher time with self control and self regulation because the portion of our brain in charge of executive function is under stimulated.
In my (humble) opinion because of all the clutter and chatter going on up there I have a harder time hearing what Russell Barkley calls “self speak” or that little voice that tell us what the most appropriate response/action is at any given time.
What gets me into trouble is; most times, I am powerless to do anything but respond to what ever little voice is loudest.
I have found that hypnotism does not solve all my problems, but it can help crank up the volume for that inner voice that really has my best interest at heart.

My yoga instructor once made a comment that has stuck with me, we were doing a pose that did not come easy for me and she said “Vicki, your balance is there you just have to find it”
Turns out, she was correct, and I think the same holds true for so many of my day to day struggles with ADD.

mctavish23
01-31-06, 03:40 PM
Vicki,

That was very well stated. Thank you.

Scattered
01-31-06, 03:53 PM
According to McTavish23, who's done the research, hypnosis does nothing for ADHD symptoms.

What I know: hypnosis is great for pain relief (childbirth, even surgery), asthma, blood pressure, etc. It's NOT effective for addictions, diet, or memory.Not quoting any research here at all -- but the chair of the counseling department at my university said he had very good success in using hypnosis to help smokers quit their smoking addiction.

Scattered

mctavish23
01-31-06, 05:23 PM
As I said earlier, I rarely use it (formal inductions).

I have used it successfully (at home) with a family member dealing w/ pain,however, that was quite some time ago.

mctavish23
02-01-06, 12:31 AM
To the best of my knowledge, there's no data supporting hypnosis as a treatment for ADHD.

In 18 yrs, I don't recall ever reading that (or hearing that either).

barbyma
02-01-06, 11:25 PM
Not quoting any research here at all -- but the chair of the counseling department at my university said he had very good success in using hypnosis to help smokers quit their smoking addiction.

Scattered

Interesting. I wonder what his technique is. Consistent and very frequent sessions might be his "secret".

The reason that hypnosis doesn't work well for addictions is that addiction relies on post-hynotic suggestions, which are extremely weak.

boardtabitz
06-01-06, 09:15 PM
I used hypnosis for an anxiety dealing with the mailbox. I was getting nasty stuff all the time from my husband's ex-wife's lawyer. It was getting to where I couldn't get the mail.

Then the same psychologist trained me in self-hypnosis for child birth. I had my biggest baby 10 pounds 7 ounces that way. It wasn't until you all brought it up that I started thinking about how weird that it worked when I can't maintain focus any other time.

I don't see how it would help adhd though. Hypnosis seems almost like an intense focus. I couldn't do it with the next baby because they wanted me to do nipple stimulation to help get the contractions more regular. That gave you a competing focus. Just didnt work to do two things at once.

barbyma
06-02-06, 12:46 AM
I don't see how it would help adhd though. Hypnosis seems almost like an intense focus. I couldn't do it with the next baby because they wanted me to do nipple stimulation to help get the contractions more regular. That gave you a competing focus. Just didnt work to do two things at once.I don't think it would work for ADHD in the sense that it would allow us to focus, but it might be a good exercise (basically meditation) to do during "breaks". It's possible that the time in the altered state might serve the same purpose as additional sleep.

Then again, it could make symptoms worse....

boardtabitz
06-02-06, 08:34 AM
I'm sure every person is different but it didn't hurt me to do it. I had to practice the self-hypnosis during the pregnancy and it was difficult to do without falling asleep because I would be so relaxed. I would use it when I got headaches too because you shouldn't take much in the way of drugs when you are pregnant. When I fell asleep it would only be for something like fifteen minutes but it was very restful.

I would do something similar with imagery with my asthmatic son when we would get caught somewhere without his inhaler. There were several times that he fell asleep on a cold hard floor while doing it but his breathing always relaxed.

barbyma
06-02-06, 11:35 AM
Hypnosis is great for pain and asthma (as you already know!).

I find it fascinating, though, how and why some people are more hypnotizable than others. And I really think either the prefronal cortex or dopamine or both are involved.

Being in the field of psychology, we have many opportunities to test our suseptibility to hypnosis and of the people that I know that are highly hypnotizable, ALL of them are ADD! The one person I know that is at the other end of the spectrum is also the least ADD person I know....

All those people in between seem "normal" in both.