View Full Version : Symptoms - Psychopathy


NeantHumain
08-12-05, 03:28 PM
Dr. Robert Hare, Ph.D. (http://www.hare.org/), has designed the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R) to measure psychopathic personality traits in an adult male forensic population on a scale from 0 to 40 with a possible score of 0 for absent to 2 for highly characteristic for each trait:

Glibness/superficial charm
Grandiose sense of self-worth
Need for stimulation/proneness to boredom
Pathological lying
Conning/manipulative
Lack of remorse or guilt
Shallow affect
Callous/lack of empathy
Parasitic lifestyle
Poor behavioral controls
Promiscuous sexual behavior
Early behavioral problems
Lack of realistic, long-term goals
Impulsivity
Irresponsibility
Failure to accept responsibility for own actions
Many short-term marital relationships
Juvenile delinquency
Revocation of conditional release
Criminal versatility
Traits measuring actual behaviors rather than traits can be removed to analyze a three-factor model of psychopathy (Cooke and Michie, 2001):

Arrogant/Deceitful Interpersonal Style



Glibness/superficial charm
Grandiose sense of self-worth
Pathological lying
Conning/manipulative
Deficient Affective Experience



Lack of remorse or guilt
Shallow affect
Callous/lack of empathy
Failure to accept responsibility for own actions
Impulsive/Irresponsible Behavioral Style



Need for stimulation/proneness to boredom
Parasitic lifestyle
Lack of realistic, long-term goals
Impulsivity
Irresponsibility


Cooke D.J., Michie C. "Refining the construct of psychopathy: Towards a hierarchical model." Psychological Assessment, 2001, 13 (2), 171-188.

heartbrokenkid
06-05-06, 02:52 AM
okay, i'll keep those in mind

lukeyboy21
10-20-06, 03:17 PM
Although I am by no means psychotic, I am ADD with depression, anxiety, and anti-social personality disorder. Now things like depression can lead to things like lowered empathy for others etc, and some of these traits are very closely correlated with ones of other disorders. This is especially true for anti-social personality disorder, which in some cases is mistaken with psychopathy.

QueensU_girl
10-23-06, 01:58 AM
PSYCHOTIC is not the same as PSYCHOPATHIC.

PSYCHOSIS is not the same as PSYCHOPATHY.

They are very different. They may co-exist, but it is very uncommon.

Please read up on their definitions!!

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FWIW, there is great overlap between ASPD and Psychopathy, although it is not always 100%.

It is estimated that approx. 75% of inmate populations qualify for a diagnosis of ASPD.

Matt S.
10-23-06, 03:35 PM
I carry the Mixed Personality Disorder Or PD-NOS label... I have a mesh Personality Disorder of Narcissistic and "Anti-Social" and I think that ASPD is the newer term for Sociopath or Psychopath or a merge of the two (Narcissism overlap) but I cant understand the Alphabet soup approach to diagnosing (ie when PD traits are due to ADHD or Bipolar etc and they (the Doc) still gives you a label.

driver8
10-23-06, 04:16 PM
I suffer from Anti-social Personality Disorder, which my Psychiatrist says is often comorbid with ADHD. It is very tough for me.

*~ žEEK ~*
11-01-06, 01:47 PM
You all threw out so many words that I can't remember exactly what my adopted brother has now! LOL :D

I believe it's either "Anti-Social Personality Disorder", or "Borderline Personality Disorder".

Anyone know anything about those disorders and how they might relate to the items in the "Psychopathy Checklist" mentioned in the first post?

My brother definately has the following traits:

Glibness/superficial charm
Grandiose sense of self-worth
Pathological lying
Conning/manipulative

Thx... :)

QueensU_girl
11-06-06, 11:36 AM
Look up Attachment Disorders, too. Adopted kids can get that if they have had unsettled early lives, with multiple caregivers.

Some kids with ADs either bond too much (needy/clingy), or cannot bond (cannot relate to other people as human beings as people with needs, too). The latter can resemble a psychopathic personality.

If your brother is under 18, i beleive the label ASPD (what most psychopaths are), cannot be used, yet. It would be a childhood-relevant diagnosis.

QueensU_girl
11-06-06, 11:55 AM
re: #5

Although there is LARGE overlap, psychopath is not always ASPD. And a person with ASPD is not always a psychopath.

For example, not all psychopaths like to hurt animals, or those weaker than themselves. (That can be an ASPD feature.)

Some psychopaths are very effective corporate types, as they have no moral 'boundaries'. For example, Donald Trump and the Enron guys are like psychopaths. When one has 'no boundaries', and a 'strong sense of entitlement' [to other people's things/bodies/money/dignity, etc., it gets rid of a lot of the social rules, doesn't it?

Read up on Dr. Robert Hare. He invented the PCL Checklist (psychopathy checklist).

http://www.crimelibrary.com/criminal_mind/psychology/robert_hare/index.html

Psychopathy is believed to be a neurological disorder of sorts. Parts of the brain that work in 'normies' often do not work in the psychopath's brain. For example, psychophysiological tests are often abnormal (such as GSR, or 'galvanic skin response') in testing. GSR measures sweating -- and is a test used during polygraph ('lie detector testing').

ASPD is believed to result from anti-social, or cruel, or chaotic parenting or extreme early life disadvantage. Thwarted milestones in Child development and Bonding ('attachment') are key. (As is Borderline Personality Disorder, in females; males get ASPD, females get BPD.)

The good thing about ASPD or Psychopathy is that people can generally do whatever they 'need to do', to get what they want/need.

The sad thing is that b/c of disabled 'Object Relations', the ASPD or psychopathic person will never have Loving or Meaningful Relationships, and will always be disconnected like a busy signal.

That is the heartbreaking part of it all.

When one has problems with 'Object Relations', they cannot see another person or animal as having emotions, feelings or sensations. They just see the other 'thing' as something to be used or exploited for their own benefit. It is strictly utilitarian.

There is only one treatment beleived to offer hope (that i have read about/heard of) -- and that is Empathy Training.

When i was recently at the Hospital for Sick Children -- they had signs up about a Conference on ASPD and Psychopathy. It was about the Evolutionary psychology behind its development. Generally, the premise is that the disorder developed to enhance survival ability in surviving early adverse childhood experiences. e.g. one will never go hungry if they don't have a conscience to prevent them from stealing, etc.

Good in the short terms; Bad in the long term (if one ever wants to have a rel'p with any meaning.) Psychopathy and ASPD share a lot of traits with Narcicisstic PD (Kernberg). http://ijo.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/46/4/400.pdf

This is probably a factor in why some ASPDers/Psychpaths report dealing with Depression.