View Full Version : Namenda


healthwiz
10-02-05, 12:51 AM
Anyone hear of Namenda? Check it out.... http://www.namenda.com/treating/index.aspx

Alzheimer;s treatment

but my doc says they are finding it works on other conditions not listed on the label, including ADD/ADHD, OC Disorder, any condition creating poor memory problems of any kind.

I'm on a trial of it, takes 21 days to get to full dose, i am on day 9, and i think my memory has improved and my confidence too. I'll do a follow up after 3-4 weeks.

Jon

Sc@tterBr@in_UK
10-02-05, 08:18 AM
I heard that they were starting to prescribe this off-label. Let us know how it goes - I am sick and tired of the rebounds from Concerta and need something more subtle!

healthwiz
10-02-05, 09:55 AM
Yes. "Off-lable" is the exact term the doctor used. My other doctor told me its cutting edge stuff to prescribe Namenda for ADD, but agreed it was worth a try. I was already feeling a lot better from a change in medication, changing to Lamictal. (see other post titled "Lamictal"), but i think the Namenda is having an additional beneficial effect.

The doc who prescribed the Namenda told me it is excellent for any condition that affects memory, and that it is a drug that helps the cells begin to regulate the calcium entering the cell. Apparently a magnesium mechanism that regulates calcium traveling into a cell, has malfunctioned in Alzheimers patients, affecting memory, and by this drug putting the regulation back into the calcium traveling into the cell, it extends the life of the cell, and it clears up "fuzzy" memory experiences that are hard to retrieve because they were encoded when there was too much calcium in the cell, which he described as watching TV with too much static. He said the static in TV is the same lines that make seeing TV possible, but too many lines disorgainzed make it hard to tell what is on tv, same with memory and too much calcium.

You seem pretty up on things Scott! How did you know about the "Off-label" term? Whats your background?

Jon

Sc@tterBr@in_UK
10-02-05, 10:19 AM
He said the static in TV is the same lines that make seeing TV possible, but too many lines disorgainzed make it hard to tell what is on tv, same with memory and too much calcium.
That is very interesting, I will have to look into this! So far I figured for me it's the Dopamine that helps with memory most - I sometimes take a 3rd Concerta 36mg when I get home, and skip weekends instead, and there is such a drastic change between evenings when I am medicated (I tend to grasp plots, and remember what I did) and those where I am not (I can hardly remember what I talked about or watched).

How did you know about the "Off-label" term? Whats your background?
I've always had a knack for quickly picking up terms related to pharmacology for some reason [I did read lots of health bible type books when I was a kid, the only interesting books in my parents' collection until I got a lovely encyclopaedia and later got allowed to pick books from the library myself :) ), and I've read up a LOT about ADD and Autism meds in the past 2 years.

I even tried studying pharmacy for a year, but while I'd be great at doing the job [apart from having to deal with customers, but I mean remembering all the info on the meds etc.], the chemistry aspect behind it all was too much for me, especially organic chemistry.

My neurologist (ADD specialists are rare in the UK and they tend to just go with standard meds, i.e. Ritalin, Dex or Adderall) even says I know far more about ADD meds than him, which is a tad worrying :eek:

healthwiz
10-03-05, 11:39 AM
Hi scott,

Maybe the organic is something you could work on, and move forward in your education. ADDers have a tendency to let one obstacle become the kindpin that knocks out all positive efforts and advancements. Those who succeed usually ignore the tough obstacles, get over them any way deemed possible, and continue. Most lawyers dont pass the bar exam, and they just take it again and again and again, sometimes 7 times, before they pass, and that is the best example of ignoring the tough obstacles and paying most attention to the positive advancements, and doing whatever necessary to pass over the tough ones.... anyhow, just a suggestion for ADDers in general.

As for your info on pharmacology, you have a lot more vested interest in knowing about meds than the neurologist, and your smart enough to understand it....so it makes sense you would know more,,,, but yes, it is scary, isnt it? I might seek another neurologist, so i could possibly be told something i DIDNT know. What do you think?

Take care!!

Jon



That is very interesting, I will have to look into this! So far I figured for me it's the Dopamine that helps with memory most - I sometimes take a 3rd Concerta 36mg when I get home, and skip weekends instead, and there is such a drastic change between evenings when I am medicated (I tend to grasp plots, and remember what I did) and those where I am not (I can hardly remember what I talked about or watched).


I've always had a knack for quickly picking up terms related to pharmacology for some reason [I did read lots of health bible type books when I was a kid, the only interesting books in my parents' collection until I got a lovely encyclopaedia and later got allowed to pick books from the library myself :) ), and I've read up a LOT about ADD and Autism meds in the past 2 years.

I even tried studying pharmacy for a year, but while I'd be great at doing the job [apart from having to deal with customers, but I mean remembering all the info on the meds etc.], the chemistry aspect behind it all was too much for me, especially organic chemistry.

My neurologist (ADD specialists are rare in the UK and they tend to just go with standard meds, i.e. Ritalin, Dex or Adderall) even says I know far more about ADD meds than him, which is a tad worrying :eek:

Sc@tterBr@in_UK
10-03-05, 03:27 PM
Maybe the organic is something you could work on, and move forward in your education. ADDers have a tendency to let one obstacle become the kindpin that knocks out all positive efforts and advancements.

My main diagnosis is AS/HFA, and it was more than just organic chemistr I couldn't cope with - I am certainly not one to give up easily, but a combination of various mild learning difficulties, not being able to cope with the 40-odd hours Uni every week, and becoming more aware of my social difficulties made it eventually clear that I had to choose a different option.

I'm quite hapy as a programmer, no need to talk to people and I can utilise my talent for written languages :)


As for your info on pharmacology, you have a lot more vested interest in knowing about meds than the neurologist, and your smart enough to understand it....so it makes sense you would know more,,,,
True, although he does have a background in pharmacology from about 15 years back (he worked on development and marketing of malaria drugs or something).

but yes, it is scary, isnt it? I might seek another neurologist, so i could possibly be told something i DIDNT know. What do you think?
Unlikely that I would find anyone else, there are only about 2 or 3 private specialists in the UK who diagnose and treat ADD type stuff, and on the NHS it's a total post code lottery. I did ask my GP if he could refer me to someone familiar with Autism and ADHD but I am not going to exppect much - waiting lists on the NHS are several years.