View Full Version : 12 Things High School Students With ADD/ADHD Would Like Their Teachers To Know


Andrew
12-22-05, 09:44 PM
From Eileen Bailey, About.com

1) I really do forget things, I am not trying to be smart, sassy or arrogant, I simply do not always remember. The myth that if it is important enough I will remember it is just that, a myth.

2) I am not stupid.,

3) I really do complete my homework. It is easy for me to lose papers, leave them at home and otherwise not be able to find my homework at the proper time. Completing homework in a notebook is much easier for me as it will not get lost as easily. Loose papers are difficult for me to keep track of. (Once my mother found my homework in the bread drawer after I had left for school!)

4) If I ask the same question over or ask many questions, it is not out of arrogance. I am trying hard to understand, comprehend and remember what you have said.

5) I want to do good. I have struggled with schoolwork for many years and it is frustrating to me. My goal is to do my best and pass this class with flying colors.

6) ADD is not an excuse. ADD really does exist and it does affect my thinking process. I would like to be "normal" and be able to remember and process information quickly, I do not enjoy being "different" and made fun of for my differences.

7) I need your help to succeed. It isn't always easy for me to ask for help and sometimes asking makes me feel stupid. Please be patient with my attempts and offer your help.

8) Please be sure to talk with me in private about behaviors or actions that may not be appropriate. Please do not humiliate me, insult me, or call attention to my weaknesses in front of the class.

9) I do better with a detailed plan and knowing what you expect. If you should change plans in the middle to adapt to some outside influence, please help me to adapt. It may take me longer to adjust to the changes. Structure and guidance are my best allies.

10) I don't like having "special accomodations." Please do not draw attention to them and help me to succeed with the least amount of attention drawn to my ADD.

11) Learn about ADD/ADHD. Read information and find out all you can on how kids with ADD learn and what can make it easier for them.

12) Always remember that I am a person with feelings, needs and goals. These are as important to me as yours are to you.

This list has been compiled by talking with several teens with ADD/ADHD. I thank them for their help.

Source: http://add.about.com/cs/forteachers/a/12things.htm

casper
12-26-05, 02:18 AM
great post and ohhh soo true!

fuzzybrain
03-15-06, 11:47 AM
Thanks so much Andrew for that post-it helps me understand kids better-to see things through their eyes-and then know how to better help them where they are. great job.

Johnnny
05-03-07, 09:13 PM
this is a great post except number 2 hould be number 1

Guest1
06-05-07, 01:22 PM
whoa this awsome and so true

ninjanicole
11-27-07, 06:55 AM
i wish my little brothers teachers would read this

~boots~
11-27-07, 06:56 AM
it is cool :-) I remember printing it off..just in case I went back to school ;)

Rudyard Rebel
11-30-07, 06:14 PM
Amen to that! Now let's hope some teachers read it....

shoppingbabe16
03-10-08, 07:52 PM
Thanks so much for that all high schoool teachers that have kids with add in their class should read this.

elizam
03-22-08, 03:52 PM
Do ya'll think any teachers might be offended if I send them this article?

The reason I ask is, lately, with a few exceptions, every teacher or administrator I've had to talk to about my ds uses stern blaming language, as though he MEANS to do everything he does wrong, like spacing out, getting frustrated, etc.

Makva
03-24-08, 10:16 PM
Do ya'll think any teachers might be offended if I send them this article?

The reason I ask is, lately, with a few exceptions, every teacher or administrator I've had to talk to about my ds uses stern blaming language, as though he MEANS to do everything he does wrong, like spacing out, getting frustrated, etc.

Honestly, some teachers would be offended but for others it might actually make something click with their understanding of the condition. Since I was diagnosed I've become MUCH more in tune to behaviors that could be related to ADHD. For example, I don't get exasperated any more when I announce a due date for something and immediately after a student asks for the due date. I see so much of myself in my students so I can't help but be sympathetic.

Other teachers, however, might have a similar attitude as the majority of people, that adhd isn't an excuse. I think in some respects it is most definitely an excuse. These kids are not adults yet. They need more help and guidance.

Sorry I keep going on and on . .

keemekee2
12-04-08, 03:57 AM
From Eileen Bailey, About.com


[QUOTE]
4) If I ask the same question over or ask many questions, it is not out of arrogance. I am trying hard to understand, comprehend and remember what you have said.

5) I want to do good. I have struggled with schoolwork for many years and it is frustrating to me. My goal is to do my best and pass this class with flying colors.

6) ADD is not an excuse. ADD really does exist and it does affect my thinking process. I would like to be "normal" and be able to remember and process information quickly, I do not enjoy being "different" and made fun of for my differences.


Oh my goodness!!! That is so me!!! I used to make everyone mad in class because I did this-elementary school, middle school, and high school. As I got further in school, I started giving up on trying to catch up on whatever I didn't get. I even was called airhead sometimes. It made me very self conscious. I am in college and force myself to zip it!!! If I think it is important, I write it down and ask privately after class.

RedSkittles
02-21-09, 07:33 PM
I love this thread, one of my favorites :3

elizam
02-21-09, 09:51 PM
As a mom of a teen son with ADHD (and bipolar), **I** understand all this about him, but I don't think teachers and administrators EVER will.

Sq2Peg
04-20-09, 02:22 PM
I agree that #2 should be first on the list, and it should be followed with the caption, if you have doubts about any of the following points, please refer back to this one.

Elizam, of all places one would expect recognition and understanding about ADD/ADHD, you'd think it'd be in the health profession. But as a nursing student, I am appauled by the ignorance shown by many of the staff in my own faculty. The slogan "Nurses Care" is just that, a slogan with no true meaning behind it. Not only do they not seem to realize that different people learn differently, they also make it harder on those that don't fit the mold.

ADDictive_714
08-12-10, 04:41 PM
From Eileen Bailey, About.com

1) I really do forget things, I am not trying to be smart, sassy or arrogant, I simply do not always remember. The myth that if it is important enough I will remember it is just that, a myth.

2) I am not stupid.,

3) I really do complete my homework. It is easy for me to lose papers, leave them at home and otherwise not be able to find my homework at the proper time. Completing homework in a notebook is much easier for me as it will not get lost as easily. Loose papers are difficult for me to keep track of. (Once my mother found my homework in the bread drawer after I had left for school!)

4) If I ask the same question over or ask many questions, it is not out of arrogance. I am trying hard to understand, comprehend and remember what you have said.

5) I want to do good. I have struggled with schoolwork for many years and it is frustrating to me. My goal is to do my best and pass this class with flying colors.

6) ADD is not an excuse. ADD really does exist and it does affect my thinking process. I would like to be "normal" and be able to remember and process information quickly, I do not enjoy being "different" and made fun of for my differences.

7) I need your help to succeed. It isn't always easy for me to ask for help and sometimes asking makes me feel stupid. Please be patient with my attempts and offer your help.

8) Please be sure to talk with me in private about behaviors or actions that may not be appropriate. Please do not humiliate me, insult me, or call attention to my weaknesses in front of the class.

9) I do better with a detailed plan and knowing what you expect. If you should change plans in the middle to adapt to some outside influence, please help me to adapt. It may take me longer to adjust to the changes. Structure and guidance are my best allies.

10) I don't like having "special accomodations." Please do not draw attention to them and help me to succeed with the least amount of attention drawn to my ADD.

11) Learn about ADD/ADHD. Read information and find out all you can on how kids with ADD learn and what can make it easier for them.

12) Always remember that I am a person with feelings, needs and goals. These are as important to me as yours are to you.

This list has been compiled by talking with several teens with ADD/ADHD. I thank them for their help.

Source: http://add.about.com/cs/forteachers/a/12things.htm

I would have LOVED to hand this to my elementary and high school teachers years ago. THANK YOU!

Inthedistrict81
06-20-11, 09:33 PM
"Ignorance is bliss" does NOT apply to teachers. I understand that most private and public schools can have a large number of students in their classrooms and it's impossible for every child to receive equal attention, however, there's no excuse for a struggling child to not get the help that he/she needs to succeed, or at the very least, to get on track. In my opinion, the only thing worse than a child drop-out is a child who wants to stay in school and succeed, but has trouble (and no support)to overcome certain barriers that will help him/her to move on to the next level. If a teacher feels that the proper response to a struggling student with ADD/ADHD involves humiliation and other forms of punishment, I can't see how this list wouldn't act as a nice wake up call in the classroom.

On a related note, as an adult who faced challenges all throughout school growing up, some teachers in high school did a lot of mental damage that took a long time for me to recover from. If your parents or other family members are supportive, do not hesitate to discuss with them the situation with your brother's teacher, especially if it seems more like he's picking on him than helping him in any sort of way.




Do ya'll think any teachers might be offended if I send them this article?

The reason I ask is, lately, with a few exceptions, every teacher or administrator I've had to talk to about my ds uses stern blaming language, as though he MEANS to do everything he does wrong, like spacing out, getting frustrated, etc.

teacher abc
07-18-11, 01:30 AM
I would certainly agree. As a SPED teacher, I would not be offended if I got this list, even though I know all of the things on it. I am not going to say I am a saint because I do not know any teacher that has never lost her cool and said something in stern language when it was not appropriate. But I do try and remember that my students, ADHD or not, do not necessarily mean things they do "wrong" (I hate that term...if it is a result of their ADHD or something else, is it wrong?). It is not just ADHD...if a student is homeless and living in shelters and is tired when she comes to school and spaces out, does he mean it? No. What I am trying to say, is that it is our job as teachers, to find out what the story is before we get stern because maybe there is a reason. If you don't then deal with the reason, then getting stern is just mean and doesn't accomplish anything anyway.

uncle shrek
08-26-11, 07:53 AM
im adhd.had a rough time at school,especially with history and english lessons.my english teacher used to recite poetry.he had such a boring voice,ive hated poetry ever since!
my biggest problems were distractions from other classmates and sitting down for long periods of time.it would have been easier for me to stand up and walk around the classroom mid lesson to "wake me up" from daydreaming and refresh my attention span.unfortunately,thats not how things were done at my school.
i had many saturday detentions in the library due to missing homework.i found i was more productive with better results in a silent library,without any distractions.
more practical lessons rather than written and theory would have helped too.ive always preferred a hands on lesson,which is why i enjoyed studying catering at college.ive been a chef now for over 20 years :-)

Donjohn8
05-17-13, 06:15 PM
As a 23-year teacher forced out because of salary concerns and a raving case of ADHD, I find it ironic that the very teachers best equipped to handle kids with ADD/ADHD are those least likely to teach it because if our unorthoxies.

courier
06-11-13, 04:16 PM
i was 10 years old when i started my last school, up from junior school to senior as it was them days. after the introduction we were sent to our first year teacher, within the first 30mins he called me out i was messing around, he told me i was not in the junior now, his words haunt me to this day, he tells me this is how we do it here, he took a running shoe out of his drawer and hit me across my backside 4 times, it never stopped throughout the 4 years i was there, and i soon started missing school, went down from the top 8 in my year to the bottom 3, there were kids who needed a labotamy getting better results tham me.

ADHDinHD
08-25-13, 08:59 AM
This list is great!
I work in a high school and see first hand how ADHD kids are treated. I feel like teachers gang up on these kids. I know teachers that will purposly push a kids buttons just so they can throw them out of the classroom. As an ADDer myself and the parent of a child with ADHD I am very disturbed by what I see in our public schools. I think there needs to be more training for those going into the teaching profession, in regard to dealing and accommodating ADHD students.

Parents you have to be an advocate for your kids don't listen to everything the teachers say. ADHD is real it effects a lot of our kids and it is up to us to fight for them so they can get the best education they can receive.

Allegra113
11-21-13, 02:45 PM
I know this is an old post, but I love it. I am a middle school teacher. I also have ADHD. I am printing this off and sending it to my colleagues. They need to understand students with all types of learning differences. We focus so much on students with executive functioning problems or dyslexia, but not ADHD (which is probably 35% of my case load). Thank you!

Froggy100
02-17-14, 12:28 AM
I applaud you in your post and am angered by the faculty at your high school as they should be ashamed of their less than classy behavior and their disregard for the law. i have been teaching middle school for 18 years and I too battle with ADHD. If you have a 504 plan or and IEP plan in place, your school must follow those guidelines very closely. Calling attention to your disability in front of others or not adhering to your accommodations is a violation of your civil rights! It happens every day in multiple schools. It could be as simple as your special area teacher not having an updated copy of your 504 etc...Knowledge is power. Do your best to get your work done but know that the law is on your side if they are violating your rights! My son is an 8th grader in my own school and two of his teachers did not have copies of his 504 plan which not only stated accommodations for his ADHD, but alerted them of his epilepsy! Read up of the Rehabilitation Act and 504 plans. Good luck to you!

eap1014
06-20-14, 02:36 AM
I wish not only teachers, but EVERYONE saw this list. I was recently diagnosed at 36 and I get a lot of eye rolls when I tell people I'm ADHD. People think it's a made-up disease and just an excuse for being lazy. I want to punch them in the face when they do that...or maybe that's just my intermittent explosive disorder talking... :)
I'm not ashamed to tell people, I'm glad to finally be able to understand why I've felt so "off" my entire life...but I hate these reactions from people who think it's a lame excuse. It's not an excuse, my brain is actually different than "normal" people.
This is actually one of the reasons why I'm back in school to get my teaching degree. So I can be the teacher I never had...one who doesn't just excuse a child as being "lazy"...one who wants to get to the reason behind the "lazy".
Sorry, rant over. :)