View Full Version : adhd and social security benefits


AmandaLynn
03-16-06, 01:49 PM
Hi everyone! I'm new to the forum.... I to need help with this. I have a 6 year old som who has Autism and ADHD and we live in Louisiana and the only income we get is my husband's Worker's Compensation. Does anyone know if he would be able to receive Social Security Benefit's b/c of this? I have done several internet searches and have come up emptied handed. If anyone out there has any information please please share it. Thanks so much....

Amanda Lynn

ClearConfusion
03-31-06, 05:53 PM
Hi and welcome to the forums! :)

Unfortunately I'm not able to answer your question, but I'm sure others will be. :)

BlessedLady
04-03-06, 11:12 PM
It doesn't just depend on income for SSI, it also depends on Resources. I'm not trying to pry & you don't have to answer this here but if you qualify for Food Stamps... then chances are he will qualify for SSI...note I said "chances are" which means might....especially in Louisiana. Go to www.ssa.gov (http://www.ssa.gov) & you might find some more info there. He also has to meet the Disability Criteria for Children. Louisiana is one of the few states that does not give any stipend or extra money to help with the SSI. But In Louisiana you are eligelible for Food Stamps vs Calif. where you aren't but you get a certain amount of money to use for food from the State. You could just go ahead & start the Application Process for SSI for your son, I'm not positive, but I believe that you might be able to do the SSI application online from that sight as well. You will be asked to sign the usual Medical Release Forms & also ones for the Parish school system & Special Education. They will mail you the forms to sign & if needed might be able to do a telephone interview with you.
I know that I'm not the only one at the ADD Forums that has some knowledge about this. So please let us know what you find & also if you aren't able to find what you need. Good Luck.
BlessedLady

PlainlyOrdinary
04-15-06, 08:08 PM
since he has never worked, i believe the program is called ssi(supplemental security income). but that he'd not need until he was older and of the age where he'd be drawing an income. as far as medical care, call your local medicaid office. medicaid is a state program; call your parish's dept. of social services. good luck.

BlessedLady
04-16-06, 05:13 AM
I got this info from www.socialsecurity.gov (http://www.socialsecurity.gov/). There is a Drop Down Bar at the top of the Homepage in the Middle.

What is the difference between Social Security disability and SSI disability?

The Social Security Administration is responsible for two major programs that provide benefits based on disability: Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI), which is based on prior work under Social Security, and Supplemental Security Income (SSI). Under SSI, payments are made on the basis of financial need.

Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) is financed with Social Security taxes paid by workers, employers, and self-employed persons. To be eligible for a Social Security benefit, the worker must earn sufficient credits based on taxable work to be "insured" for Social Security purposes. Disability benefits are payable to blind or disabled workers, widow(er)s, or adults disabled since childhood, who are otherwise eligible. The amount of the monthly disability benefit is based on the Social Security earnings record of the insured worker.

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is a program financed through general revenues. SSI disability benefits are payable to adults or children who are disabled or blind, have limited income and resources, meet the living arrangement requirements, and are otherwise eligible. The monthly payment varies up to the maximum federal benefit rate, which may be supplemented by the State or decreased by countable income and resources.

The Social Security Administration is responsible for two major programs that provide benefits based on disability: Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI), which is based on prior work under Social Security, and Supplemental Security Income (SSI). Under SSI, payments are made on the basis of financial need.

Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) is financed with Social Security taxes paid by workers, employers, and self-employed persons. To be eligible for a Social Security benefit, the worker must earn sufficient credits based on taxable work to be "insured" for Social Security purposes. Disability benefits are payable to blind or disabled workers, widow(er)s, or adults disabled since childhood, who are otherwise eligible. The amount of the monthly disability benefit is based on the Social Security earnings record of the insured worker.

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is a program financed through general revenues. SSI disability benefits are payable to adults or children who are disabled or blind, have limited income and resources, meet the living arrangement requirements, and are otherwise eligible. The monthly payment varies up to the maximum federal benefit rate, which may be supplemented by the State or decreased by countable income and resources.

BlessedLady

dormammau2008
07-08-06, 05:59 PM
can you claim then on add adhd? then????? dorm,.....

BlessedLady
07-09-06, 10:54 AM
can you claim then on add adhd? then????? dorm,.....
The dx of ADD/ADHD alone , in a child or adult, even if medications are needed Does Not Meet The Eligibility Criteria for SSI and/or SSD.

BlessedLady

Bloomingfield
08-12-07, 01:31 PM
Many legal aid/legal services offices will assist low income people with social security disability issues, including social security applications for adults and children. I suggest that you find out what, if any, legal service organization works with people in your area and contact them to see if you are eligible. The information is often on the internet. In general, here is the basics of what I know from working in this area: 1. Talk to the child's doctors about this issue, what they think, etc. Doctor support for the person who is applying for SSI makes a huge difference on the success of the application. Have the doctor write a letter of support to the SSA if he or she will agree 2. ADHD is not an automatic "yes" in terms of getting disability benefits, but if it significantly effects the child's abilities in school, etc. and/or if there are co-conditions or other disabilities, you might be able to convince the Social Security Administration that it is necessary in your case. If the child is school age, what the teachers say and the child's grades and behavior will make a big difference. Low grades and bad behavior = a more likely "yes" than good grades and good behavior. Also, if the child has an IEP, it may make a difference. Also, you may have a better case if the child is in special education classes. It is all a matter of weighing all the issues, however. Also, many SSI applications do not get approved on the first try so I generally tell people to appeal the case up to getting a hearing in front of an administrative law judge who, from my experience, are generally very good at taking everything into account that they have in front of them to consider. This brings up my last point - document, document and document behaviors well and share them with the SSA people who have your application. If the behaviors can be backed up by what doctors and service provides say, all the better. Again, this is not a "for sure" thing but just general advice. Talk to a legal services advocate or attorney in your area.