View Full Version : 50 conditions that mimic ADHD, PART I


speedo
03-27-06, 01:06 AM
http://adhdparentssupportgroup.homestead.com/50conditionsmimicingADHD.html

! 1.) Hypoglycemia (Low Blood sugar) Low blood sugar can stem from thyroid disorders, liver or pancreatic problems, or adrenal gland abnormalities, or even an insufficient diet. Hypoglycemia can display the same ADHD like sypmtoms. 2.(! 2.) Allergies: 15 to 20 percent of the world has some type of allergy. A person can be allergic to nearly anything so check for all forms. Food is one of the primary causes of allergic reactions. Just like the Car and human analogy stated above. If a child eats food they are allergic to, the body will not run properly and that may affect behavior. Everyone has different sensitivities to allergens so just because you aren't affected does not mean your child won't be also.



3.(! 3.) Learning disabilities: If the primary place of behavior problems is at school, learning disabilities may be the cause of ill behavior. One of the main things that affect a child's self-esteem is how well they do in school. If a child has an undiagnosed learning disorder that makes school much harder and sometimes impossible. Children with undiagnosed learning disabilities are labeled as lazy, stupid, and many other downgrading opinions that affect self-esteem.



4.(! 4.) Hyper or hypothyroidism: An imbalance in metabolism that occurs from an overproduction or underproduction of thyroid hormones. This imbalance may cause a variety of behaviors and may affect all body functions.


5.(! 5.) Hearing and vision problems: If a child can't see or hear properly, school and daily things in life are nearly impossible and it may cause ADHD like symptoms especially in educational settings.


6. (! 6.) Mild to high lead levels, even in the absence of clinical lead poisoning: research shows that children with even mildly elevated lead levels suffer from reduced IQs, attention deficits, and poor school performance. Lead is the leading culprit in toxin-caused hyperactivity..




7.(*1.) Spinal Problems: Some spinal problems can cause ADHD like symptoms because if the spine is not connected to the brain properly nerves from the spinal cord can give the brain all of signals at once making a child rambunctious and always on the go.


8.(*2.) Toxin exposures: Children are more vulnerable to toxins than adults. Such as pesticide-poisoning (Eating vegetables and fruit not washed thoroughly, they can be exposed to them by playing outside on the ground), also by gasoline fumes, and herbicides. Inside there are also many toxins. Disinfectants, furniture polishes and air fresheners are toxins that can affect some children's behaviors. Beds and carpets are one of the most dangerous places in the house because they are full of different types of dust, and other toxins. Toxins can cause hyperactivity, attention deficits, irritability, and learning problems.


9.(*3.) Carbon Monoxide poisoning : Thousands of children each year are exposed to toxic levels of this gas each year. Sources include gas heaters, and other gas appliances such as fireplaces, dryers, and water heaters.


10.(*4.) Seizure disorders: The most overlooked is the absence Seizures. During an absence seizure, the brain's normal activity shuts down. The child stares blankly, sometimes rotates his eyes upward, and occasionally blinks or jerks repetitively, he drops objects from his hand, and there may be some mild involuntary movements known as automatisms. The attack lasts for a few seconds and then it is over as rapidly as it begins. If these attacks occur dozens of times each day, they can interfere with a child's school performance and be confused by parents and teachers with daydreaming.


11.(*5.) Metabolic disorders: They reduce the brain's supply of glucose, the bodies fuel and can cause ADHD like symptoms.


12. (*6.) Genetic defects: Some mild forms of genetic disorders can go unnoticed in children and display some of the same symptoms of ADHD. Mild forms of Turner's syndrome, sickle-cell anemia, and Fragile X syndrome are some examples. Almost any genetic disorder can cause hyperactivity or other behavior problems, even if the disorder isn't normally linked to such problems. Many genetic diseases disrupt brain functions directly, through a variety of paths.


13.(*7.) Sleeping disorders or other problems causing fatigue and crankiness during the day.


14.(*8.) Post-traumatic subclinical seizure disorder: It causes episodic temper explosions. These fits of temper come out of the blue for no reason. Some of these seizures can be too subtle to detect without a twenty-four-hour electroencephalogram (EEG).

15.(*9.) High mercury levels: One of the most interesting things regarding high mercury levels is that it can relate to dental fillings. Children who have mercury amalgam fillings in their mouth and grind their teeth are at risk of high mercury levels. American dental associations are defensive on the subject of mercury fillings but many European countries have discontinued the use of them because of side effects.



16.(*10.) High manganese levels


17.(*11.) Iron deficiency: Iron is an essential component of hemoglobin, the oxygen carrying pigment in the blood. Iron is normally obtained through the food in the diet and by the recycling of iron from old red blood cells. The causes of iron deficiency are too little iron in the diet, poor absorption of iron by the body, and loss of blood. It is also caused by lead poisoning in children.


18.(*12.) B vitamin deficiencies: Many experts believe that one of the main causes for inattention, hyperactivity, impulsivity, temper tantrums, sleep disorders, forgetfulness, and aggression are caused by faulty neurotransmissions a problem with the neurotransmitters in the brain. Vitamin B-6 is a necessary vitamin used in the making of neurotransmitters that affect behavior.


19.(*13.) Excessive amounts of Vitamins: Excessive amounts of vitamins can be toxic to the body and may cause the same ADHD like symptoms. It is possible to overdose when taking vitamins so make sure you contact a physician and check for vitamin deficiencies before taking extra vitamins.


20.(*14.) Tourette's syndrome: Tourette's syndrome is a rare but disruptive condition. It involves multiple tics (small, repetitive muscle movements), usually facial tics with grimacing and blinking. Tics may also occur in the shoulders and arms. This is usually accompanied by loud vocalizations, which may include grunts or noises, or uncontrollable (compulsive) use of obscenities or short phrases. The tics are worse during emotional stress and are absent during sleep. The cause is unknown. It occurs most often in boys, and may begin around age 7 or 8 or not until the child is in his or her late teens or early twenties. It may, at times, run in families. This disorder can be mistaken for not being able to sit still or impulsive behavior.


21.(*15.) Sensory Integration Dysfunction: Sensory Integration Dysfunction is the inefficient neurological processing of information received through the senses, causing problems with learning, development, and behavior. These children are over-sensitive or under-sensitive dealing in touch, taste, smell, sound, or sight. For example, some of these children crave fast and spinning movement, such as swinging, rocking, twirling, and riding the merry-go-round- without getting dizzy. These children may move constantly, fidget, enjoy getting into upside down positions and be a daredevil. These children may become overexcited when there is too much to look at words, toys, or other children. They may cover their eyes, have poor eye contact, be inattentive when drawing or doing desk work, or overreact to bright light. These children often act out in an attempt to cope with their inability to process sensory information such as acting out in crowded or loud places.



22.(**1.) Early-onset diabetes: Symptoms include aggression, depression, and anxiety. If you have a family history of diabetes checking for this is a must.


23.(**2.) Heart disease: It affects blood and oxygen flow to the brain affecting brain function that in-turn affects behavior.


24.(**3.) Cardiac conditions: It can reduce the supply of blood, oxygen and nutrients to the brain.


25.(**4.) Early-Onset Bi-Polar disorder: Also know as child-like Bi-polar. The experts state that 85% of children with child-like Bi-polar also meet the criteria for ADHD. The symptoms are extremely close. Most people when they think of Bi-polar disorder, think of Adult like Bipolar which mood swings happen over a somewhat long period of time. In child-like Bipolar, the mood swings can happen many times within a twenty-four hour day, known as rapid cycling. At one moment they're calm and the next minute they could be in a full fledge temper tantrum. Some of the symptoms are Distractibility, Hyperactivity, impulsivity, separation anxiety, restlessness, depressed mood, low self-esteem, and many more. Early-Onset Bi-polar should be ruled out before ADHD is considered mainly because they are treated with different medications if you choose medications that is. ADHD is treated with stimulant medications which will make a Bipolar child worse possibly psychotic.




26.(***1.) CAPD (Central Auditory processing Disorder) will sometimes occur in children who have had a history of ear infections and/or PE tubes. Symptoms include distractibility, inability to follow a set of verbal instructions, "space out", etc.


27.(***2.) Worms: Such as Pinworms lay their eggs in the anal area, causing tickling and itching, which are most bothersome at night. The lack of sleep from this type of infestation can cause crankiness or bad behavior during the day. When asleep, nightmares may be present. This problem is mostly found in very young children preschool to kindergarten because of primitive toileting skills, they tend to put their fingers in their mouths, and they participate in a lot of hands-on activities with other kids and with pets. Roundworms, hookworms, and tapeworms are other examples that can make a child display ADHD like symptoms. Worms cause hyperactive behavior, learning problems, depression, or attention deficits by making children miserable on the inside.


28.(***3.) Viral or bacterial infections: When a child is affected by an infection that might cause problem behavior.


29.(***4.) Malnutrition or improper diet: Many children in the United States do not eat a well balanced diet. A proper diet is necessary to growing children. An improper diet can affect a child's behavior in an ill way.

speedo
03-27-06, 01:06 AM
30.(***5.) Head injuries: Such as the postconcussion syndrome. Some of the symptoms include Irritability, emotionality, memory problems, depression, and sleep disturbances. A concussion can disrupt brain functioning causing ADHD like symptoms.


31.(***6.) Dietary Factors: (For example to much caffeine and sugar) At doses as low as 250 milligrams a day, a level many American children exceed- caffeine can cause rambling speech, attention and concentration problems, agitation, heart palpitations, insomnia, and hyperactive behavior. In a way, it is true we are what we eat.


32.(***7.) Some disorders such as anemias reduce oxygen to the brain causing disturbance in the brains chemistry causing ADHD like symptoms.




33.(***8.) Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) or Fetal alcohol effects (FAE): FAS is a name that doctors use to describe the damage done to children's brains and bodies when their mother drink heavily during pregnancy. It is the leading form of mental retardation today. Prenatal alcohol impairment, however, also comes in a milder form called fetal alcohol effects (FAE). Children with FAE often don't look disabled, and they tend to score in the low-normal or even normal range of intelligence. But these kids arent normal. Their mal-developed brains cause them to exhibit a wide range of behavior problems, including hyperactivity, attention problems, learning disorders, and ethical problems such as stealing, lying, and cheating.


34.(***9.) Intentionally or unintentionally sniffing materials such as modeling glue or other house hold products.

35.(***10.) Some drugs:, (both prescription and illegal) can cause the brain to atrophy, leading to disturbed cognition and behavior. If your child routinely takes prescription or over-the-counter medications for asthma, hay fever, allergies, headaches, or any other condition, consider the possibility that the drugs are causing or contributing to behavior problems.

36.(***11.) :A beta-hemolytic streptococcus:(better known as "strep.") Although these bacteria are most commonly thought of as the cause of strep throat. Left untreated, strep can cause rheumatic fever and a movement disorder called Sydenham's chorea. Moreover, recurrent infections can lead, in susceptible children, to a group of symptoms collectively known as PANDAS (Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders) Some symptoms of PANDAS include obsessive-compulsive behavior, Tourette's syndrome, hyperactivity, cognitive problems, and fidgeting.



37.(***12.) Lack of exercise: "Hyper Couch Potatoes" are children who aren't moving enough. Some children because of lack of exercise may seem as though they are always in motion, but often that motion is in fits and spurts: leaping up from a chair, spinning around in the lunch line, bouncing in a chair while watching TV. Quite a few hyperactive children actually do not get enough sustained, strenuous exercise to stay healthy mentally and physically. Exercise can make people happier, less anxious, less hyperactive, and less depressed. One reason is that exercise increases serotonin levels in the brain exactly what Prozac, Elavil, and similar drugs do.


38.(***13.) Gifted Children: Gifted children often display ADHD like symptoms because most of the time they are bored with what other kids their age are doing. Behaviors associated with Giftedness are poor attention, boredom, daydreaming, low tolerance for persistence on tasks that seem irrelevant, their judgment often lags behind their development of intellect, their intensity may lead to power struggles with authorities, and they may have a high activity level. They may need less sleep compared to other children, and they may question rules, customs, and traditions. If your child scores above average on IQ tests, aces exams, has no trouble with homework, has no apparent learning disabilities, and primarily exhibits his or her problems mostly at school, maybe seeking a more challenging class or school would help.


39.(***14.) Emotional problems: Kids who are experiencing emotional problems most often display ADHD like symptoms. For example, kids who are constantly subjected to bullying at school can display ADHD like symptoms. These are normal kids that act out because they are scared. They experience sleeping problems, sadness, and they develop physical symptoms, especially if they think those symptoms will keep them home from school. Often they can't concentrate in class, partly because they are worried and partly because they are suffering from sleep deprivation. Really any emotional problem at school or home in which a child is having trouble coping with can result in ADHD like symptoms.


40.(***15.) Some kids are spoiled and undisciplined: A number of children labeled hyperactive are merely under-disciplined children. They tend to run their household and get away with anything. Dr Syndey Walker stated this problem best of why parents under-discipline their children. He stated that he blamed not the parents but on the psychological experts who have counseled parents for several decades that children are fragile, easily traumatized little flowers who could be ruined for life by a cross look or a scolding which is very untrue. Children need firm discipline and strict rules not abuse but setting rules and standards and demanding those standards be met, and giving consequences when your rules are broken. Labeling undisciplined kids as ADHD who are not gives them an excuse for their misbehavior, which will often make it worse.

41.(***16.) Spirited children: When dealing with spirited children the problem usually does not lie with the child but with society's perception of what normal childhood behavior is. Many normal children, according to some people, display ADHD like symptoms not because they are hyperactive or lack sufficient attention spans but because the person forming the opinion has unrealistic standards of how a child should behave.


42.(***17.) Lack of understanding and communication skills: One of the main reasons why a child acts out and throws temper tantrums when they have a problem is because of their lack of understanding of a problem and lack of expressing how they feel. Children do not have the vocabulary or know how to express their emotions like adults do, that's why many act out when they are in a difficult situation. They are not able tell you something is wrong so they show you instead. This is one reason why any emotional or medical problem can cause acting out behavior in children.






43.(Rare 1.) Early stage brain tumors: Found rarely in children but should still be considered. Statistically, this diagnosis may not be important but to individual families, they assuredly are.


44. (Rare 2.) Brain cysts: Another rare cause of hyperactivity but should still be considered when searching for the reasons behind displayed ADHD like behavior.



45. (Rare 3.) Temporal lobe seizures: The Temporal lobe is a part of the brain. Any brain malfunction can cause inappropriate behavior. That's why conducting brain scans is a must when trying to figure out behavior problems.



46. (Rare 4.) Klinefelter syndrom: A Genetic disorder in which a male has an extra X chromosome (XXY). Many individuals experience learning, behavior, and social problems. A degree of subnormal intelligence appears in some affected individuals. Many affected individuals are skinny and taller than most of their peers. A simple blood test can rule this disorder out.


47.(Rare 5.) Genetic Disorder XYY: The extra Y chromosome has been associated with antisocial behavior.



48. (Rare 6.) Porphyria: A hereditary enzyme-deficiency disease. Enzymes are very important to our body's chemical reactions. Really nothing occurs in our body without enzymes. A lack of enzymes causes body malfunctioning which can cause ill behavior.


49. (Rare 7.) Candida Albicans infestation (Yeast Infection) : Candida infestations cause hyperactivity in children. Most children who do suffer from Candida infestations have some underlying problem frequently an immune disorder, or a disorder affecting carbohydrate metabolism and thus altering blood sugar levels. So immune disorders can cause other problems that also have the same symptoms of ADHD.


50. (Rare 8.) Intestinal parasites: Parasites rob the body of needed nutrients which in-turn affects behavior.

speedo
03-27-06, 08:25 PM
Ever think that your adhd could have a cause that is curable ??

ME :D

addinbc
03-27-06, 08:37 PM
Hi Speedo;

Thanks for the thread.

I'm surprised that they didn't list atypical depression (particularly for inattentive ADHD), although 'atypical' depression is apparently not all that atypical at all.

Symptoms can include (sometimes in addition to symptoms of 'typical' depression): fatigue (low energy/leaden paralysis), emotional blunting, problems with concentration, problems with motivation, emotional reactivity/sensitivity to rejection, hypersomnia, and increased appetite (and/or weight gain).

speedo
03-27-06, 08:40 PM
is that the same as unipolar depression ?

ME :D

addinbc
03-27-06, 08:54 PM
Yes - it is unipolar depression...

But the symptoms are considered 'atypical' (e.g.; instead of the loss of appetite as with typical depression, 'atypical' depression presents with increased appetite; same with sleep).

here is an article: http://pn.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/38/20/20

Carla B.
03-27-06, 09:41 PM
This is a very useful list, and I am glad you posted it Speedo. But I do feel the need to interject some caveats.

It is my personal sense that, yes, conditions such as these are often seen, in people who have the traits and symptoms of ADD. Right off the top, there more than a couple I know to apply to me. That said, having those things treated had little impact on my cognitive functioning or my chronic lack of sufficient dopamine. I may have just become more energetic about finding my lost keys {grin] once my thyroid was treated, but I still lose the keys as often.

So do I think it is useful to "warn" people about the other conditions they may experience? Yes. Do I think that having those things diagnosed and treated will improve overall wellbeing? You bet. Will an improvement in overall wellbeing assist with the symptoms of ADD? No doubt. But I fear it is misleading to suggest that resolving these other things will "cure" the ADD. If misapplied, that view could lead to more blaming and shaming of a child for distressing obstacles that are still brain and biology driven.

The real rub is that while an adult can have some perspective and insight on how long and chronic a problem has been and what other conditions appear to go along with it, it is very difficult to have the same perspective or insight about a child. Every responsible expert I've seen make recommendations about ADD in kids suggests a comprehensive pediatric history and physical, but I suspect that advice is not always followed.

Thus the benefit of a list like this, to me, is to (a) alert people to insist on that comprehensive physical and (b) to make them aware of things a person with ADD may also experience. But both (a) and (b) seem more useful to me than leading with a suggestion that the symptoms of ADD may "really" be this or that thing instead of the ADD.

barbyma
03-31-06, 11:00 PM
In addition to Carla's caveats, I'd like to add my own in response to some of these "conditions". Most of the conditions listed here are either bogus or do not in any way resemble ADHD.


! 1.)Hypoglycemia (Low Blood sugar)Low blood sugar can stem from thyroid disorders, liver or pancreatic problems, or adrenal gland abnormalities, or even an insufficient diet. Hypoglycemia can display the same ADHD like sypmtoms.Thyroid problems don't necessarily exclude the possibility of ADHD. In fact, a large percentage of children with bipolar disorder also have thyroid problems and ADHD.


2.(! 2.)Allergies: 15 to 20 percent of the world has some type of allergy. A person can be allergic to nearly anything so check for all forms. Food is one of the primary causes of allergic reactions. Now, that's just not true.

The prevalence of true food allergies is about 3% in children and less than 1% of adults.
The most common cause of allergic reactions is pollen.




7.(*1.)Spinal Problems: Some spinal problems can cause ADHD like symptoms because if the spine is not connected to the brain properly nerves from the spinal cord can give the brain all of signals at once making a child rambunctious and always on the go.
Silly! There's absolutely nothing to this. There aren't any "spinal problems" that can make children rambunctious!





8.(*2.) Toxin exposures: Children are more vulnerable to toxins than adults. Such as pesticide-poisoning (Eating vegetables and fruit not washed thoroughly, they can be exposed to them by playing outside on the ground), also by gasoline fumes, and herbicides.


True. But toxicity from these kinds of things is EXTREMELY rare.



9.(*3.)Carbon Monoxide poisoning: Thousands of children each year are exposed to toxic levels of this gas each year. Sources include gas heaters, and other gas appliances such as fireplaces, dryers, and water heaters.
Also true. But it doesn't cause ADHD symptoms! Children die from carbon monoxide poisoning. They don't develop hyperactivity or innattention.





15.(*9.)High mercury levels:One of the most interesting things regarding high mercury levels is that it can relate to dental fillings.

This is pure myth and it has been debunked many times over.




16.(*10.)High manganese levels
:confused:





17.(*11.)Iron deficiency:Iron is an essential component of hemoglobin, the oxygen

Symptoms don't look anything like ADHD.



18.(*12.) B vitamin deficiencies:Many experts believe that one of the main causes for inattention, hyperactivity, impulsivity, temper tantrums, sleep disorders, forgetfulness, and aggression are caused by faulty neurotransmissions a problem with the neurotransmitters in the brain.NONE of those problems are related to Vitamin B deficiencies. The only symptoms of Vitamin B deficiencies that come close are confusion & disorientation.

Vitamin B deficiency is extremely rare in the U.S., and the more common symptoms are things like mouth ulcers.



23.(**2.)Heart disease: It affects blood and oxygen flow to the brain affecting brain function that in-turn affects behavior.



24.(**3.)Cardiac conditions: It can reduce the supply of blood, oxygen and nutrients to the brain. :confused:




29.(***4.)Malnutrition or improper diet: Many children in the United States do not eat a well balanced diet. A proper diet is necessary to growing children. An improper diet can affect a child's behavior in an ill way.

Perhaps, but not likely ADHD symptoms.


32.(***7.) Some disorders such as anemias reduce oxygen to the brain causing disturbance in the brains chemistry causing ADHD like symptoms.Wasn't that #17? Isn't it also covered in #23 & #24? This is also just silly.





37.(***12.)Lack of exercise:"Hyper Couch Potatoes" are children who aren't moving enough. Some children because of lack of exercise may seem as though they are always in motion, but often that motion is in fits and spurts: Exercise is good. Exercise can reduce symptoms. But lack of exercise does NOT cause ADHD symptoms. It's probably mostly responsible for the rise in obesity, though.




38.(***13.) Gifted Children: Gifted children often display ADHD like symptoms because most of the time they are bored with what other kids their age are doing.
Now, this is probably true. But then kids like mine get delays in diagnosis because we just think he's bored.....


I won't even go there with the "rare" ones.

speedo
04-01-06, 09:47 AM
I do agree that amalgam fillings can't possibly lead to high mercury levels in the body.
Amalgam has a really low solubility and basically can't be absorbed into the blood in amonts that are detectable. Amazingly though, I've rad that the europeans have banned the use of amalgam dental fillings because of their mercury content.

However; Mercury poisioning DOES mimmic the symptoms of ADHD, as will other metals, particularly lead and to a lesser extent, silver. The key here is that metal poisioning comes with additional symptoms besides confusion and hyperactivity.

Also, certain spinal problems CAN cause excitability and distractedness that could be mistaken for ADHD. Lyme disease can lead to a degenerative disk condition that does exactly that... along with neuropathic pain, of course... Again, the key is that there will also be other symptoms present besides hyperactivity and distractedness.

I agree with the rest of your comments, as the article is poorly worded.

Me :D


In addition to Carla's caveats, I'd like to add my own in response to some of these "conditions". Most of the conditions listed here are either bogus or do not in any way resemble ADHD.

Thyroid problems don't necessarily exclude the possibility of ADHD. In fact, a large percentage of children with bipolar disorder also have thyroid problems and ADHD.

Now, that's just not true.

The prevalence of true food allergies is about 3% in children and less than 1% of adults.
The most common cause of allergic reactions is pollen.

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Silly! There's absolutely nothing to this. There aren't any "spinal problems" that can make children rambunctious!

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True. But toxicity from these kinds of things is EXTREMELY rare.



Also true. But it doesn't cause ADHD symptoms! Children die from carbon monoxide poisoning. They don't develop hyperactivity or innattention.




This is pure myth and it has been debunked many times over.



:confused:


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Symptoms don't look anything like ADHD.


NONE of those problems are related to Vitamin B deficiencies. The only symptoms of Vitamin B deficiencies that come close are confusion & disorientation.

Vitamin B deficiency is extremely rare in the U.S., and the more common symptoms are things like mouth ulcers.


:confused:


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Perhaps, but not likely ADHD symptoms.

Wasn't that #17? Isn't it also covered in #23 & #24? This is also just silly.
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Exercise is good. Exercise can reduce symptoms. But lack of exercise does NOT cause ADHD symptoms. It's probably mostly responsible for the rise in obesity, though.


Now, this is probably true. But then kids like mine get delays in diagnosis because we just think he's bored.....


I won't even go there with the "rare" ones.

barbyma
04-01-06, 01:28 PM
However; Mercury poisioning DOES mimmic the symptoms of ADHD, as will other metals, particularly lead and to a lesser extent, silver. Well, I suppose that would depend on how similar something has to be for you to consider it similar. Here's a post I made on the topic in another thread:

http://www.addforums.com/forums/showpost.php?p=273269&postcount=53

I don't agree that these symptoms are similar to ADHD.



Also, certain spinal problems CAN cause excitability and distractedness that could be mistaken for ADHD. Lyme disease can lead to a degenerative disk condition that does exactly that... along with neuropathic pain, of course... Again, the key is that there will also be other symptoms present besides hyperactivity and distractedness.Any sources for this?

The comment on the list you posted, particularly in context with many of the other comments, sounds like a chiropractic quack statement, but if we're talking about specific things like your example, I'd be interested in looking at it. My mother-in-law and a close friend have both disk problems and depression, and I'd like to see how they might be related.

stanzen
04-08-06, 06:18 PM
Thanks for the posting Speedo. Looking over the list, my first response was, hummm, that's interesting.

Then I found myself refuting or limiting each condition, line by line. Then I tried to identify the underlying flaw in the list.

Carla is spot on.


Thus the benefit of a list like this, to me, is to (a) alert people to insist on that comprehensive physical and (b) to make them aware of things a person with ADD may also experience. But both (a) and (b) seem more useful to me than leading with a suggestion that the symptoms of ADD may "really" be this or that thing instead of the ADD.
The list presents a non-sequester, that these numerous conditions may mimic ADHD (certainly debatable), therefore you or your kid may have one of these, implying that they don't have ADHD.

This is a logical flaw that defeats any benefits of the list, as written.
If a, then not b, when a and b are unrelated, not mutually exclusive.


Of course, folks ought to be concerned about physical conditions like heavy metal poisoning, or lead exposure, or untreated Lymes disease (which can cause a dementia -rare- that looks like senile dementia, not ADHD), if there's good reason to suspect exposure or if characteristic symptoms of illness are evident.

But how often do these conditions even present themselves to potentially interfere with a diagnosis of ADHD (assuming that they could)?

Not very often.



:eek: - I take that back. Adults and kids can carry high mercury loads, from eating seafood too often.

speedo
04-08-06, 06:29 PM
I think the important thing to know is that there are a lot of things that can mimmic ADHD.
They ought to be ruled out early in the diagnostic process in order to avoid getting treated for the wrong illness.



The first thing I was tested for was metal poisioning. Along with that test the doc ordered blood sugar and thyroid... also with the usual blood tests in case I had allergies of some kind. They took 5 tubes of blood that day.

From there I followed up and discovered a hearing problem that was adding to my sensory troubles.

I was later diagnosed with ADHD combined type and anxiety disorder NOS. Now, I've been diagnosed with insomnia and sleep aphnia....and there is lots more to come.

ME :D

stanzen
04-08-06, 06:59 PM
I agree with you here, speedo. A targetted clinical work-up is a good idea.

Trouble is, if you search too far afield you're likely to obtain a positive finding to something that isn't clinically relevent.

That's what we need, a more confused ADD diagnosis.


Oh, and amalgams can certainly cause mercury poisoning. (http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/00014464.htm)
Episode 1. On August 7, 1989, four adult occupants (two men and two women ranging in age from 40 to 88 years) of a private home were hospitalized for evaluation of nausea, diarrhea, shortness of breath, and nonspecific chest pain. During hospitalization, the patients experienced progressive dyspnea and pulmonary insufficiency.

On August 11, investigators learned that one of the patients had been smelting dental amalgam in a casting furnace in the basement of the home in an attempt to recover silver from the amalgam. Mercury fumes released during the operation apparently had entered air ducts in the basement and had circulated throughout the house.
These folks all died. :(

Lesson: If your concerned about mercury exposure and yank your amalgam fillings. Don't be a cheapskate and attempt to recover the silver. Dispose of them, instead -- in an environmentally friendly manner, of course. ;)

speedo
04-08-06, 07:15 PM
Mercury poisioning is a nasty way to die. I have read of a researcher who was exposed to methyl mercury and died in 6 months. There was not a lot doctors could do. It was absorbed through her skin and was spread throughout her body very quickly.

ME :D


I agree with you here, speedo. A targetted clinical work-up is a good idea.

Trouble is, if you search too far afield you're likely to obtain a positive finding to something that isn't clinically relevent.

That's what we need, a more confused ADD diagnosis.


Oh, and amalgams can certainly cause mercury poisoning. (http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/00014464.htm) Episode 1. On August 7, 1989, four adult occupants (two men and two women ranging in age from 40 to 88 years) of a private home were hospitalized for evaluation of nausea, diarrhea, shortness of breath, and nonspecific chest pain. During hospitalization, the patients experienced progressive dyspnea and pulmonary insufficiency.

On August 11, investigators learned that one of the patients had been smelting dental amalgam in a casting furnace in the basement of the home in an attempt to recover silver from the amalgam. Mercury fumes released during the operation apparently had entered air ducts in the basement and had circulated throughout the house.
These folks all died. :(

Lesson: If your concerned about mercury exposure and yank your amalgam fillings. Don't be a cheapskate and attempt to recover the silver. Dispose of them, instead -- in an environmentally friendly manner, of course. ;)

balanced
07-30-07, 08:02 PM
I'm thinking you might have missed one. Bipolar Disorder. When I was little I was diagnosed as ADHD, but never medicated. As a teen I then diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder. It goes back and forth. Currently I take lamictal, adderall, and klonopin. I don't know what I have, but I know my doctor treats the symptoms.

Both Bipolar disorder and ADHD share many characteristics: impulsivity, inattention, hyperactivity, physical energy, behavioral and emotional lability (behavior and emotions change frequently), frequent coexistence of conduct disorder and oppositional-defiant disorder, and learning problems. Motor restlessness during sleep may be seen in both (children who are bipolar are physically restless at night when "high or manic",though they may have little physical motion during sleep when "low or depressed"). Family histories in both conditions often include mood disorder. Psychostimulants or antidepressants can help in both disorders (that is, depending on the phase of the bipolar disorder). In view of the similarities, it is not surprising that the disorders are hard to tell apart.

speedo
07-30-07, 10:19 PM
Yes. Bipolar disorder can sometimes be hard to distinguish from ADHD.

Another one is Pervasive developmental disorder (including asperger's syndrome).
People who have a PDD sometimes are mistakenly diagnosed with ADHD.

Me :D

I'm thinking you might have missed one. Bipolar Disorder. When I was little I was diagnosed as ADHD, but never medicated. As a teen I then diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder. It goes back and forth. Currently I take lamictal, adderall, and klonopin. I don't know what I have, but I know my doctor treats the symptoms.

Both Bipolar disorder and ADHD share many characteristics: impulsivity, inattention, hyperactivity, physical energy, behavioral and emotional lability (behavior and emotions change frequently), frequent coexistence of conduct disorder and oppositional-defiant disorder, and learning problems. Motor restlessness during sleep may be seen in both (children who are bipolar are physically restless at night when "high or manic",though they may have little physical motion during sleep when "low or depressed"). Family histories in both conditions often include mood disorder. Psychostimulants or antidepressants can help in both disorders (that is, depending on the phase of the bipolar disorder). In view of the similarities, it is not surprising that the disorders are hard to tell apart.

Carla B.
07-31-07, 04:35 PM
I'm thinking you might have missed one. Bipolar Disorder. When I was little I was diagnosed as ADHD, but never medicated. As a teen I then diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder. It goes back and forth. Currently I take lamictal, adderall, and klonopin. I don't know what I have, but I know my doctor treats the symptoms.

Both Bipolar disorder and ADHD share many characteristics....And let's not forget it's not an either/or issue!

Co-morbidities are common with ADHD. I have seen people treated for many combos at the same time, e.g. ADD + depression or bipolar or OCD or Tourette's. That's why, as you note, many physicians these days treat more on the symptoms than on the diagnosis codes.

For me, all of it confirms a "spectrum" sense of things. I see ADD (and its own spectrum of intensity) as the first layer of an onion that can circle out to connect with more aggravated diagnoses, each of which can occur alone or in combination. Thus lots of folks are "only" ADD and remain so, with or without subclinical threads of some other issues, while others may find over time that some other untreated aspects are worsening, or that treating the ADD brings the rest of what still remained to see.

Whether meds for ADD are helpful, alone or in combo, is a highly individual thing to be explored with a skillful MD who refines the aim over time. But behavioral strategies will be useful for anyone with focusing issues and that part could get short shrift if "ADD" was crossed off the menu.

In short, I'd love to see us start framing the mind as a complex ecosystem of linking, evolving interdependencies instead of reducing it to an either/or checklist that never quite fits.

QueensU_girl
07-31-07, 05:11 PM
I would add other hormonal disorders or blood disorders and various imbalances, too. Anything threatening homeostasis of the body/brain.


The Parathyroid:

One that comes to mind is Parathyroid Problems: "hyperparathyroidism" or "hypoparathyroidism"!

These diseases often look "mental" (fatigue, inattention, learning problems, behavioural issues) and is often missed. (I once knew a Pediatrician's daughter who has this. She was written off as a "crazy" or "depressed female" for a long time. She has school problems like LD/ADD inattention, too.)

MS & other myelination or muscle degenerative diseases:

Early stage MS also has "mental" symptoms of inattention, learning issues, behavioural problems, etc.

Delirium States:
e.g. infections (incl pneumonia, etc), toxicities, organ failure problems, shock, blood loss, injuries, endocrine hormones, imbalances, hypoxia, anemia, etc. (can create all varying levels of delirium, which could have 'inattention' or 'restlessness' as a feature)

Airway Issues:
Also, TONSILS and ADENOIDS can obstruct an airway so much (in daytime and nighttime) that a child's growing brain does not get the air (O2) that it needs.

I read about a case of a girl with "retardation" and "learning problems" who, in fact, had this problem (Dr. Meier Kryga's book?). Sadly, her brain had developed in an Oxygen-Starved environment, so her problems were lifelong.

---

These lists are quite endless!

speedo
07-31-07, 05:15 PM
All of these things underscore the need to SEE A DOCTOR if you think you have ADHD.

ME :D

LeeAnne
02-09-08, 08:03 PM
I'm glad to have read this. I'm already seeing a naturopath, and it seems I do have a food allergy. My pdoc thinks it's odd I am doing this. funny, it seems to me that my diet has ALOT to do with everything.

My pdoc is trying to get me on lithium. And I won't because something isn't right. I'm amazed being the amount of research my doctor has done, that she isn't supportive enough.

mijahe
02-09-08, 09:16 PM
This is a good list Speedo - it's good to see it here, (and become sticky).

I think one of the important points for people who are unsure of what they have, (or whether they think they have been diagnosed incorrectly), is that a lot of these conditions that mimmic ADHD/ADD are short lived. So, the question you should ask yourself is: "Has this been happening all my life?". If 'yes', then you can wipe off nearly all these conditions apart from a couple - basically genetic disorders, and lead/mercury poisoning, (which accrues in the body and never releases).

k10magic
05-23-08, 12:08 AM
I find it pretty surprising the some people are so quick to dismiss all of those conditions and being completely bogus.

To the person ruling out all those conditions -- are you even qualified to be doing that? Doing some quick google searching that explain the symptoms briefly are not enough to determine if something is bogus or not.

Most of these conditions can have a variety of symptoms that show up in a variety of ways. Many times they can indeed be mistaken for AD/HD.

A lot of people medicated for AD/HD right now could have other underlying conditions that could *actually* be causing it.

My two cents

theta
05-24-08, 09:17 PM
Might post various thoughts on these 50 things(In my own random order):

1. Hypothyroidism. Personally my mother, brother and myself have it. The symptoms I noted were cold intolerance and fatigue. Which improved with
thyroxine but it did not correct any of my core ADHD related deficits[inattention, impulsivity].

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypothyroidism#Adults symptoms

http://thyroid.about.com/od/thyroidbasicsthyroid101/a/5lies_2.htm

That mentions the Barnes temperature method (and its limitations)of determining if you might have low thyroid. In my case my body temperture was quite low upon waking (96-97). Oh your body temperture gets lower in the night anyway so this test depends on a normal night of sleep and waking at the normal time.

2. Lead , Pb I had a hair analysis test in 2001 that said I had 40 ppm.
(0-1.4 consider normal) I had the test because I suspected high levels of lead. Hair analysis of Lead is not consider legit by the FDA I should warn.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lead_poisoning

The symptoms of chronic lead poisoning include neurological problems, such as reduced cognitive abilities, or nausea, abdominal pain, irritability, insomnia, metal taste in oral cavity, excess lethargy or hyperactivity, headache and, in extreme cases, seizure and coma. There are also associated gastrointestinal problems, such as constipation, diarrhea, vomiting, poor appetite, weight loss, which are common in acute poisoning. Other associated effects are anemia, kidney problems, and reproductive problems.

I would say I had: reduced cognitive abilities,irritability, insomnia, metal taste in oral cavity, excess lethargy ,gastrointestinal problems, kidney pain, poor appetite.

I took DMSA and in just a few days I had an extreme increase in energy levels. Though the perception of increased energy faded quickly. I took it in the normal treatment protocol. Over the years I studied up on Lead .Some of
the effects of lead are permanent particularly to those 6 and under. Also most
your bodies lead burden will be in hard tissue like bones. So even if you completely eliminate your environmental exposure and under go treatment you can anticipate your blood levels will rebound. R-alpha-lipoic acid has been shown in studies in combination with DMSA to reduce lead burden from the brain. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12135622?ordinalpos=4&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsP anel.Pubmed_RVDocSum)

Oxidative stress similar to methamphetamine neurotoxicity is part of how lead damages the brain. And a number of similar antioxidants used to prevent methamphetamine neurotoxicity have been used to prevent the damages from lead. Though if their much good after exposure is not clear, but since it will be nearly impossible to get blood lead levels to zero you might could mitigate future toxicity.

Its impossible to say how much lead has played a role in my inattention and impulsivity but unfortunately treatment did not reduce the deficits.

Smitten79
06-28-08, 01:19 AM
2. Lead , Pb I had a hair analysis test in 2001 that said I had 40 ppm.
(0-1.4 consider normal) I had the test because I suspected high levels of lead. Hair analysis of Lead is not consider legit by the FDA I should warn.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lead_poisoning



I would say I had: reduced cognitive abilities,irritability, insomnia, metal taste in oral cavity, excess lethargy ,gastrointestinal problems, kidney pain, poor appetite.

I took DMSA and in just a few days I had an extreme increase in energy levels. Though the perception of increased energy faded quickly. I took it in the normal treatment protocol. Over the years I studied up on Lead .Some of
the effects of lead are permanent particularly to those 6 and under. Also most
your bodies lead burden will be in hard tissue like bones. So even if you completely eliminate your environmental exposure and under go treatment you can anticipate your blood levels will rebound. R-alpha-lipoic acid has been shown in studies in combination with DMSA to reduce lead burden from the brain. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12135622?ordinalpos=4&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsP anel.Pubmed_RVDocSum)

Oxidative stress similar to methamphetamine neurotoxicity is part of how lead damages the brain. And a number of similar antioxidants used to prevent methamphetamine neurotoxicity have been used to prevent the damages from lead. Though if their much good after exposure is not clear, but since it will be nearly impossible to get blood lead levels to zero you might could mitigate future toxicity.

Its impossible to say how much lead has played a role in my inattention and impulsivity but unfortunately treatment did not reduce the deficits.

theta, if I was you I would also do blood and urine tests to monitor Lead levels rather than just relying on one hair analysis result and your symptoms being consistent with Lead toxicity. You could see what

I know in my own case, while my hair Lead levels weren't abnormally high, the hair mineral analysis showed that my Lead to Iron ratio was abnormally high - which was bad in their report. Anyway I had my blood levels of Iron and Lead tested, and everything came out normal. My urine Lead levels were normal as well.

I know you are male and males aren't advised to take Iron supplements unless there is something wrong with their Iron levels, but have a look at some papers (see below) of the relationship between Iron and Lead and ADHD...

Like you mention, the neurotoxicity damage of Lead in your 'developing brain' may have already been done but still it might be worthwhile to make sure your Iron levels are sufficient. Serum Ferritin is the test that is needed.

Be very careful if you do try to supplement with something like Iron of course- excessive iron levels are said to commonly contribute to health problem in males. Still, if I had ADHD and excessive Lead levels (shown by Blood, Hair, and/or Urine), I would want to make sure I carefully tried increasing my Iron levels and seeing if there was any kind of improvement in my symptoms.


The short article written below by Konofal and Cortese focus on the potential neuroprotective role of iron against the deleterious effect of lead on the development of ADHD symptoms...

http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlere...i?artid=1940080 (http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=1940080)

Journal List > Environ Health Perspect > v.115(8); Aug 2007

PubMed articles by:
Konofal, E.
Cortese, S. Environ Health Perspect. 2007 August; 115(8): A398–A399.
doi: 10.1289/ehp.10304.
Copyright This is an Open Access article: verbatim copying and redistribution of this article are permitted in all media for any purpose, provided this notice is preserved along with the article's original DOI
Perspectives
Correspondence
Lead and Neuroprotection by Iron in ADHD
Eric Konofal and Samuele Cortese
Child Psychopathology Unit, University Hospital Robert Debré, Paris, France, E-mail: eric.konofal@rdb.aphp.fr
The authors declare they have no competing financial interests.

We read with special interest the article by Braun et al. (2006). In this large survey, the authors concluded that prenatal exposure to tobacco and environmental lead are risk factors for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
We would like to focus on the potential neuroprotective role of iron against the deleterious effect of lead on the development of ADHD symptoms.

Although the mechanisms underlying ADHD remain unclear, both genetic and environmental factors have been implicated. In a recent review on the implication of the dopaminergic system in the etiology of ADHD, Swanson et al. (2007) highlighted the importance of environmental risk factors as possible etiologies of dopamine deficit. Among these environmental factors, Swanson et al. (2007) cited the effects of lead exposure (at levels < 10 μg/dL) on ADHD-related behaviors and ADHD diagnosis.

Lead in the central nervous system may contribute to dopaminergic dysfunction inducing alteration of dopamine release and dopamine receptor density (Gedeon et al. 2001; Lidsky et al. 2003). Moreover, lead may disrupt the structure of the blood–brain barrier function essential for brain integrity (Dyatlov et al. 1998). Interestingly, Wang et al. (2007) recently reported that iron supplementation protects the integrity of the blood–brain barrier against lead insults. On the other hand, iron deficiency could increase the toxic effect of lead, suggesting a potent neuroprotective effect of iron supplementation on dopaminergic dysfunction due to lead exposure (Wright 1999; Wright et al. 2003)

In a controlled comparison group study, we (Konofal et al. 2004) showed that iron deficiency was correlated to ADHD symptoms severity, hypothesizing that iron supplementation may improve symptoms of ADHD in those subjects with low ferritin levels.

Given that lead exposure may contribute to ADHD and iron deficiency may exacerbate deleterious effects caused by lead, we recommend systematically seeking for iron deficiency in children with ADHD. We also think that controlled studies assessing the potential effectiveness of iron supplementation on ADHD symptoms should be encouraged. Such studies could aid the understanding of the complex pathophysiology underlying ADHD and provide effective therapeutic strategies for this disorder.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Below is some more correspondence regarding the article, "Exposures to Environmental Toxicants and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder [ADHD] in U.S. Children," by Braun et al. from Brondum and the reply from Braun et al. to the comments of both Brondum, and Konofal and Cortese...


Letter: Brondum J
Response: Braun JM, Lanphear BP, Kahn RS, Froehlich T, Auinger P

Environmental Exposures and ADHD

Environ Health Perspect 115:395-399 (2007). doi:10.1289/ehp.10274 available via http://dx.doi.org (http://dx.doi.org/) [Online 24 June 2007]

Referencing: Exposures to Environmental Toxicants and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in U.S. Children

In their article, "Exposures to Environmental Toxicants and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder [ADHD] in U.S. Children," Braun et al. (2006) advanced our knowledge of the effects of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) and lead on the central nervous system of children. With respect to lead exposure, the study, importantly, focused on an older age group (4–15 years) than is generally studied (< 6 years) because of the greater sensitivity of the developing central nervous system to environmental insult early in life [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 1997].

In the logistic model used by Braun et al. (2006), the association of ADHD with lead exposure was statistically significant in the highest exposure quintile; however, it was also tenuous. Although not unheard of, the cutoff (p < 0.2) for inclusion of factors and variables associated with ADHD on univariate analysis was generous compared with the commonly used 0.1 or 0.05, and very close to the p-value of the lead–ADHD association of 0.19. The lead–ADHD relationship also exhibited a significant monotonic dose response, so it would have been helpful to know how the authors developed their exposure metric. Why, for example, were quintiles selected rather than another interval scheme, and why were they not of uniform size? Was the reported dose response the only model considered, or did the authors investigate other models, as some have done in studying the relationship of lead exposure and cognition (Canfield et al. 2003)?

Braun et al. (2006) noted that their analyses were limited by the cross-sectional nature of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data they used, precluding adjustment of their model for certain covariates and potential confounders (e.g., parental psychopathology). Based on data from multiple studies, ADHD heritability has been estimated to be about 75% (Biederman and Faraone 2005). Inability to adjust for parental psychopathology is therefore an important limitation, because adjustment would likely reduce—and might eliminate—the associations of ADHD with ETS and lead. In studies of lead exposure and cognition, some of which Braun et al. (2006) cited as being consistent with their findings, the strength of the IQ–lead relationship can be dwarfed by the relationship of IQ to other factors such as parenting and socioeconomic status (Koller et al. 2004). When reporting associations of environmental contaminants and pathology, it seems prudent to maintain a broader perspective, as well as an environmental health perspective.

The authors declare they have no competing financial interests.

Jack Brondum
Hennepin County Department of
Human Services and Public Health
Environmental Health and Epidemiology
Hopkins, Minnesota
E-mail: jack.brondum@co.hennepin.mn.us
References

Biederman J, Faraone SV. 2005. Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Lancet 366: 237–248.

Braun JM, Kahn RS, Froehlich T, Auinger P, Lanphear BP. 2006. Exposures to environmental toxicants and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in U.S. children. Environ Health Perspect 114:1904–1909.

Canfield RL, Henderson CR Jr, Cory-Schlechta DA, Cox C, Jusko TA, Lanphear BP. 2003. Intellectual impairment in children with blood lead concentrations below 10 µg per deciliter. N Engl J Med 348:1517–1526.

CDC. 1997. Screening Young Children for Lead Poisoning: Guidance for State and Local Public Health Officials. Atlanta, GA:Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Koller K, Brown T, Spurgeon, Levy L. 2004. Recent developments in low-level lead exposure and intellectual impairment in children. Environ Health Perspect 112: 987–994.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

ADHD: Braun et al. Respond

Environ Health Perspect 115:395-399 (2007). doi:10.1289/ehp.10274R available via http://dx.doi.org (http://dx.doi.org/) [Online 24 June 2007]

We appreciate the comments of Brondum, and Konofal and Cortese, and the opportunity to clarify our results (Braun et al. 2006). It is common practice to select variables with a p-value of 0.2 for inclusion in multivariable models (Katz 1999). Although the association of blood lead levels and ADHD appeared "tenuous" in bivariate analysis (i.e., p = 0.19), this was largely an artifact of our decision to categorize blood lead levels. When we entered lead into our multivariable analysis as a continuous variable, we found a 1.2-fold increased odds [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.0–1.4; p = 0.02] of ADHD for each 1.0-µg/dL increase in blood lead levels. The blood lead quintiles were not divided into exactly equal sample sizes because we used weighted percentages to categorize the data. We decided a priori to present the analysis in quintiles to make the results easier to interpret and also to illustrate any dose–response relationships for blood lead levels and ADHD.

As we noted in the "Discussion" of our article (Braun et al. 2006), a limitation of our study was the inability to adjust for parental psychopathology. This is an unfortunate trade-off when using a large nationally representative survey. In other studies, prenatal tobacco exposure has been shown to be a risk factor for the development of ADHD after controlling for parental psychopathology (Mick et al. 2002; Weissman et al. 1999). Although there is considerable experimental and epidemiologic evidence linking lead exposure with behaviors consistent with ADHD, future studies of childhood lead exposure will need to confirm our results by accounting for parental psychopathology and other potential confounders.

The hypothesis proposed by Konofal and Cortese—that iron deficiency may play a role in symptom severity among children with ADHD—is intriguing. Indeed, it was their original research that prompted us to incorporate ferritin as a measure of iron status (Konofal et al. 2004). It is certainly plausible that iron deficiency may confound or modify the effects of environmental lead exposure on ADHD in children. Alternatively, lead exposure may act as a confounder or modifier for the observed effects of iron deficiency with ADHD. Unfortunately, we were not able to examine whether ferritin (or other indicators of iron status) was associated with ADHD symptom severity using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Nor did we specifically test for an association between iron deficiency and ADHD. Although iron or other micronutrient supplementation may protect children from lead toxicity, recent evidence from a double-blind randomized trial (Kordas et al. 2005) suggests that iron and zinc supplementation did not appreciably lower blood lead levels or improve child behavior, as measured by the Conners Rating Scales. However, Kordas et al. included only children without anemia in their trial.

The authors declare they have no competing financial interests.

Joe M. Braun
Department of Epidemiology
University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
E-mail: jmbraun@unc.edu


Bruce P. Lanphear
Robert S. Kahn
Tanya Froehlich
Department of Pediatrics
Cincinnati Children's Hospital
Medical Center
Cincinnati, Ohio
E-mail: bruce.lanphear@chmcc.org


Peggy Auinger
Department of Pediatrics
University of Rochester School of Medicine
Rochester, New York
References

Braun JM, Froehlich TF, Kahn RS, Auinger P, Lanphear BP. 2006. Exposures to environmental toxicants and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in U.S. children. Environ Health Perspect 114:1904–1909.

Katz M. 1999. Multivariable Analysis: A Practical Guide for Clinicians. New York:Cambridge University Press.

Konofal E, Lecendreux M, Arnulf I, Mouren M. 2004. Iron deficiency in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 158:1113–1115.

Kordas K, Stoltzfus RJ, Lopez P, Rico JA, Rosado JL. 2005. Iron and zinc supplementation does not improve parent or teacher ratings of behavior in first grade Mexican children exposed to lead. J Pediatr 147:632–639.

Mick E, Biederman J, Faraone SV, Sayer J, Kleinman S. 2002. Case-control study of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and maternal smoking, alcohol use, and drug use during pregnancy. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 41:378–385.

Weissman MM, Warner V, Wickramaratne PJ, Kandel DB. 1999. Maternal smoking during pregnancy and psychopathology in offspring followed to adulthood. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 38:892–899. <!--IBF.ATTACHMENT_220856--><!--QuoteEnd-->

ADHDKylee
11-16-08, 09:49 PM
what if you are diagnosed as ADHD, ODD, OCD, and feel severly depressed alot? does that mean the ADHD wan't a write daignosis too? honestly how would anyone ever REALLY know if it was honestly ADHD?

speedo
11-17-08, 07:48 PM
I'm sort of displeased with this thread. The reason is that I created the thread as a list of things that look like ADHD but are not ADHD. Some people seem to be interpreting the list as "a list of things that cause ADHD", which it is not.

For example: Food allergy is on the list. The national institute of health has found that ADHD is NOT caused by food allergies. If you have ADHD and you are treating yourself for a food allergy, you are wasting your time and money on an approach that is known to NOT be a cause of ADHD. The same goes for caffeine and suger intake. It has been known for years that sugar intake does not cause ADHD and in the case of caffeine the hyperness goes away after you stop taking it.

So I really dislike the thread that I created because it misleads people into treating themselves with unproven (and possibly unsafe) methods and medicines.


ME :D

SpaceOddity
11-17-08, 11:02 PM
Hey Speedo, Just wanted to say Don't feel regrets for posting that; I have been researching everything from ADD to Lyme's to various 'fatigue' syndromes, & the controversy is mind-blowing. There is still so much unknown about the brain & all the body processes that affect it, and WOW is the science complex! I think you do a service to bring this up, if only to demonstrate how much research is needed. (p.s.: this is my 1st or 2nd post, so if I screwed anything up, Sorry!) There are so many kind & interesting people on these forums, & thru sharing our experiences we hopefully may eventually have more successful treatment of these truly agonizing conditions. Thank you for your efforts! Keep it up.

ustilago
11-17-08, 11:23 PM
51. Stress. . .

I have to go put the kids to bed and get some work done but after that I will come back and edit in some of the information from my first Stress Management Group session. . .

After reading through the description of being overly stress, I have to wonder if I have AADD or just suffer from excessive stress. . .

Imnapl
11-17-08, 11:41 PM
So I really dislike the thread that I created because it misleads people into treating themselves with unproven (and possibly unsafe) methods and medicines.It's not your thread, it's human nature that's the problem. It is also difficult for people to find access to a professional assessment from an ADHD expert. No surprise people are self-diagnosing themselves online and then attempting to treat themselves.

DesertDave
11-18-08, 01:21 AM
... So I really dislike the thread that I created because it misleads people into treating themselves with unproven (and possibly unsafe) methods and medicines.

If they read the entire thread, hopefully they'll understand it's not causes.

But if they rule out some other things, they'll end up back here with the rest of us, anyway. And perhaps resolved other issues along the way.

So it's all good discussion. And always a learning experience, which is why I'm here.

Thank you.

ustilago
01-25-09, 04:57 AM
Better late than never eh?

Stress management group was canceled after our third meeting because it was down to two of us and that's too small to call a group. . .

Anyway, one of the handouts in the first session listed Behavioral, Mental and Relationship symptoms of stress, a number of which that I found remarkably similar to AD(H)D symptoms.

Behavioral:
Difficulty sleeping, emotional outbursts, irritation/anger/aggression, excessive eating/loss of appetite, difficulty relaxing, avoidance, withdrawl, inactivity
Mental:
forgetfulness, dull senses, low productivity, negative attitude, confusion, lethargy, whirling mind, no new ideas, boredom, spacing out, negative self talk, poor concentration.
Relationship:
Isolation, intolerance, resentment, loneliness, lashing out, hiding, clamming up, lowered sex drive, nagging, distrust, lack of intimacy, using people, fewer contacts with friends.

I exhibit about 95% of these symptoms. . . is it stress, AD(H)D, depression, all of the above, none of the above, something else entirely?

kettish
01-27-09, 06:03 PM
So, could an untreated concussion as a child cause ADHD that simply went undiscovered for years? Head trauma is one thing I've got to look into for myself. :P

Does herbicide poisoning cause ADHD symptoms only when it's occuring, or does the damage after the fact also mimic ADHD?

And I've got to look into the unipolar depression thing. What's the difference between that and inattentive-type ADD, and how would I be able to tell?

indy
03-23-09, 12:46 AM
oh man, where to start?

some of these conditions are sooo rare and do not present with ADHD symptoms at all. somebody else went through the entire list with good counter points so i won't do it, but i believe posting something like this is quite alarmist.

indy
03-23-09, 12:49 AM
So, could an untreated concussion as a child cause ADHD that simply went undiscovered for years? Head trauma is one thing I've got to look into for myself. :P

Does herbicide poisoning cause ADHD symptoms only when it's occuring, or does the damage after the fact also mimic ADHD?

And I've got to look into the unipolar depression thing. What's the difference between that and inattentive-type ADD, and how would I be able to tell?

my brother had a traumatic brain injury when he was 2 and he has extreme ADHD symptoms.

unipolar depression isn't anything like ADHD. depression includes emotional and psychological symptoms that can occur with ADHD but are not ADHD. suicidal thinking/gestures. constant low psychological behaviour. it's just not ADHD.

kettish
04-07-09, 06:46 PM
I've read a lot of places (especially Sari Solden's book) that depression can look a lot like inattentive ADD, in addition to oftentimes occuring with it. And depression is not limited to suicidal thinking and gestures; a lot of people are depressed for a long time before arriving at suicidal ideations or behaviors, so that can't be used as a diagnostic basis.

And doesn't inattentive type ADD include "constant low psychological behavior"? I'm not trying to be a b*tch, I'm just trying to clarify, because your statement seemed a bit contradictory.

jawnyg
04-13-09, 05:15 AM
my brother had a traumatic brain injury when he was 2 and he has extreme ADHD symptoms.

unipolar depression isn't anything like ADHD. depression includes emotional and psychological symptoms that can occur with ADHD but are not ADHD. suicidal thinking/gestures. constant low psychological behaviour. it's just not ADHD.

I had a severe head injury when I was four, my head bounced off of the dashboard and I still have the Jeep oil gauge ring right in the middle of my forehead. I assume that is enough to cause some frontal lobe damage. I have spent the rest of my life in and out of depression and wold be brought to tears trying to force myself to focus in school. I was recently diagnosed, again, for ADHD. The first time three years ago, I was diagnosed ADHD and Bi-Polar so I was put on Depakote and that sucked the life out of me. Recently I the test results just say ADHD and I have been put on Adderall. From my reading I definily match may of the symtoms of ADHD-PI and there is a very strong connection to head trama. Is this really common? Is your brother ADHD-PI?

Jawnyg

Infinity
04-25-09, 02:00 PM
No one has mentioned PSTD as mimicking ADHD yet.

I found this artical which looks good.

http://www.nhchc.org/Network/HealingHands/2006/Aug2006HealingHands.pdf

Now if we adress CPSTD which is say someone who is brought up in a dysfunctional home and was bullied etc . from age what Five?

which By the way is why many children who have ADHD are treated. poorly ..:confused::rolleyes:

I suppose the thinking would be then these ADHD "like' symptoms would be long standing also . so that would rule out long standing as a positive indicator of ADHD,

talk about caught in between a rock and a hard place.. :P

So I guess having had to be put in a harness at a age two and three because the child was bouncing off the walls running at nine months never learned to walk first.

might THAT qualify .. :confused:


I really think people need to be given meds ( If they want to try }to see if it will change thier lives when these fine points are being discussed while people continue to suffer..
PERIOD .

If the person gets worse . it may mean another problem exists . Or try something else.

I guess this is yet another draw back of an individual whos sought help for years and the diagnosis of ADHD is missed and you have all the trauma stuff out there so theres this .

"Oh wait ."
it may not be that.

For cry out loud.

Infinity~

raen
05-27-09, 07:04 AM
That is a fantastic list. As far as others who disagree, just to bust your chops, Don't you guys watch House ?

γ-quantum
05-27-09, 07:56 AM
too impatient to read pages 2 and 3, hope this hasnt been said, but i got another one to add:

X) children (and adults) not being kept appropriate to the species.

i think working 20 hours a day with 2 hours sleep a day, all sitting in front of a pc without any physical activity, but lots of mental stress instead, is NOT an appropriate to the species life for most people.


as a side note... wow, here i found another dozen comorbid disorders / causes i could have. yay?

for example, i was never checked for heavy metal poisoning. that could be, i guess. i ate a lot of mercury as a kid (swallowed my many amalgam fillings while eating seafood).

friya47
07-27-09, 10:23 PM
Life stresses can cause some of the same symptoms of a <link rel="File-List" href="file:///C:%5CDOCUME%7E1%5Cuiser%5CLOCALS%7E1%5CTemp%5Cmsoh tml1%5C01%5Cclip_filelist.xml"><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:WordDocument> <w:View>Normal</w:View> <w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom> <w:PunctuationKerning/> <w:ValidateAgainstSchemas/> <w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid> <w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent> <w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText> <w:Compatibility> <w:BreakWrappedTables/> <w:SnapToGridInCell/> <w:WrapTextWithPunct/> <w:UseAsianBreakRules/> <w:DontGrowAutofit/> </w:Compatibility> <w:BrowserLevel>MicrosoftInternetExplorer4</w:BrowserLevel> </w:WordDocument> </xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:LatentStyles DefLockedState="false" LatentStyleCount="156"> </w:LatentStyles> </xml><![endif]--><style> <!-- /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-parent:""; margin:0in; margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman";} a:link, span.MsoHyperlink {color:blue; text-decoration:underline; text-underline:single;} a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed {color:purple; text-decoration:underline; text-underline:single;} @page Section1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.25in 1.0in 1.25in; mso-header-margin:.5in; mso-footer-margin:.5in; mso-paper-source:0;} div.Section1 {page:Section1;} --> </style>ADHD children Life altering such as moving to a new town and/or school, traumatic experiences, any form child abuse, the death of a loved one, divorce and even the birth of a sibling. It is imperative that the diagnosis be conducted by a medical professional who is trained in wide variety of child and adolescent disorders.

Bobthebuilder
08-25-09, 05:43 PM
Welp, the doc finally got back to me, turns out I don't have ADD (still think I do to a certain extent, but I got a new thing to add to this list

Post-chemotherapy cognitive impairment (also known as chemotherapy-induced cognitive dysfunction, chemo brain or chemo fog)

"Memory loss, attention deficits, difficulty learning, and mood changes are commonly reported side effects of chemotherapy."

I had chemo almost 9 years ago

Infinity
08-26-09, 10:46 PM
Hi Bob,

When I read NINE yaers I thought.. BS ! but apparently its possible .

If you had the syptoms befor chemo that would point to ADHD.


Don't let that keep you from getting meds..;)

http://www.breastcancer.org/treatment/planning/ask_expert/2008_10/question_04.jsp



Infinity~

Bobthebuilder
08-27-09, 08:45 PM
I had chemo when I was 11 (19 going on 20 now)... so I honestly didnt notice much from chemotherapy... I did notice a slow decline in my grades, and a lingering sense of impending doom which struck last semester.

I can't seem to focus on things I don't want to do, like HW, and stuff, unless I do it at the very last minute. And I believe that aspect... 'laziness' as it seems, has been around before chemo. Even going through Chemotherapy, I felt very indifferent through the whole process... I just was along for the ride so to speak. I'm still like this today, I live day by day, and have little motivation to do otherwise.

They said I wasnt as figity as and ADDer would be. But I know i am !%#!ing figity. Right now I'm sitting on my chair backwards, in some weird position. I've always played with random things laying around... and I'm pretty damn impulsive.

Well I set up an appointment with a Pdoc, I think a little push could go a longgg way in my situation, so that gives me hope.

MADD_MEN
08-27-09, 08:50 PM
I had chemo when I was 11 (19 going on 20 now)... so I honestly didnt notice much from chemotherapy... I did notice a slow decline in my grades, and a lingering sense of impending doom which struck last semester.

I can't seem to focus on things I don't want to do, like HW, and stuff, unless I do it at the very last minute. And I believe that aspect... 'laziness' as it seems, has been around before chemo. Even going through Chemotherapy, I felt very indifferent through the whole process... I just was along for the ride so to speak. I'm still like this today, I live day by day, and have little motivation to do otherwise.

They said I wasnt as figity as and ADDer would be. But I know i am !%#!ing figity. Right now I'm sitting on my chair backwards, in some weird position. I've always played with random things laying around... and I'm pretty damn impulsive.

Well I set up an appointment with a Pdoc, I think a little push could go a longgg way in my situation, so that gives me hope.

Not all ADDers are figity. If you're ADHD-PI or combined, you may not be figity. Although, it does sound like you may be figity.

kendrabean
08-30-09, 10:55 PM
Maybe I just didn't see it...but how is anxiety/depression NOT on here? They have identical symptoms sometimes. So much so that most are diagnosed with anxiety instead of ADHD.

MsProcrastinate
09-08-09, 11:18 PM
This is a useful list. I believe it is worth noting that some of the conditions could also be caused from ADD/ADHD.

Imnapl
09-08-09, 11:38 PM
This is a useful list. I believe it is worth noting that some of the conditions could also be caused from ADD/ADHD.mimic: to resemble closely; simulate

Bjartur
02-03-10, 07:14 PM
Add on #39: Traumatic experiences may cause emotional problems for a long time. (Alcohol in family, sexual abuse. etc.)

sPacie~Gracie
02-07-10, 03:39 AM
weee, oh boy! I could relate to some of the symptoms and still have ADD too.........

Spacemeat
02-17-10, 09:23 PM
Lists like this tend to make me feel paranoid.

Don't get me wrong: I think it's useful and I appreciate the work that went into the original post; I don't mean to sound as though I am complaining.

My concern is that some of these may apply to me, but I'm fairly confident that my physician also thinks that I am a hypochondriac as it is. The truth is that I simply like to 'rule things out,' especially since I have had several health problems throughout my lifetime...

I have wondered about having some sort of thyroid-related testing done, though!

Tim_R
03-17-10, 01:26 PM
WOW. Thanks for the info. I never knew spinal issues could cause this... Although it makes sense. I had two burst discs that were fused in 1997. I have been in Chronic pain ever since. Nor did I know seizures could do this. I had more seizure than I can remember after a bought of encephalitis which...also the caused lots of memory issues and neurological problems, some that never got better. I could go on... My medical background is so convoluted, i'm not sure what I really have anymore. Thanks for the info though. It helps to know what can be causing some of the things I am experiencing.

desolationangel
04-19-10, 02:44 PM
Yeah, this list... I understand the point, but I think things like this can make people think that a diagnosis or the possibility of ADHD as the last hypothetical possibility. I dunno, I went the whole naturopathic route for years- thyroid stuff, food allergy, chiropractic, chemical sensitivity, etc. All it left me was far poorer with just as many issues.

Not saying you can't have these other problems, I just know countless people who have tried all of these alternative therapies/ alternative diagnoses with little in the way of results.

doihaveit
05-01-10, 08:26 PM
Wait then does this mean one might NOT have ADD/ADHD and it can be from these abnormalities instead?

Imnapl
05-01-10, 09:00 PM
Wait then does this mean one might NOT have ADD/ADHD and it can be from these abnormalities instead?Correct.

dakayus
06-14-10, 02:10 PM
Hey everyone, I thought I'd drop some knowledge on you guys since most of your information comes from wikipedia or other rather skewed information. Just for clarification I'm a 3rd year medical student so I don't know all that much, but I definitely know enough to say certain DDx are pretty much bs.

http://adhdparentssupportgroup.homestead.com/50conditionsmimicingADHD.html

!1.)Hypoglycemia No this is just dumb. No physician would confuse the two. You'd have other signs such as being so hypoglycemic that you have seizures/passing out/etc. 2.(! 2.)Allergies: I'm not sure who the heck thought of this unless they just wanted their "vindicated" pneumonic for random things it's not. Again on PE you'd see rhinitis and what not.



3.(!3.)Learning disabilities: ADHD is a learning disability so this is poor classification.



4.(!4.)Hyper or hypothyroidism:hypothyroidism you'd be retarded, low reflexes, and pretibial myxedema so no. Hyper could look pretty similar, but you'd have tachycardia, sweating, extreme heat intolerance and myxedema all over.



5.(! 5.) Hearing and vision problems: What? This is ridiculous.



6.(!6.)Mild to high lead levels, Yeah, this happens in 3rd world countries or places with lead paint which was stopped in the 70's, but there's be more stuff presenting than ADHD stuff. It's more fatigue due to Pb poisoning hemoglobin (ferrochelatase fyi).



7.(*1.)Spinal Problems: Uhh.... this is so vague since spinal problems can encompass anything, and I'd have absolutely no idea what would present such as this. Maybe something like guillian-barre in EXTREME circumstances, but then again, that's just a no.



8.(*2.) Toxin exposures: No, toxin is a short term thing except for the more fat solubile ones which will be stored in fat and would be released when kid is fasting.



9.(*3.)Carbon Monoxide poisoning: You get sleep, and barf. This is acute and lasts a day or so. No



10.(*4.)Seizure disorders: You'd be pretty stupid as a physician to mix up the two. You'd get an EEG done to rule out absent seizures. Plus when you're absent, you don't remember even zoning out.



11.(*5.)Metabolic disorders: No. Although there's a ton of metabolic disorders, most of them that could present somewhat like ADHD would also generally have gross motor retardation such as severe muscle cramps anytime they run (McArdle's dz) or profound retardation and dead like metachromic leukodystrophy



12. (*6.)Genetic defects: This is a definite yes, but there's a ton to worry about. Generally you would see other stuff first instead of just inattention.

13.(*7.) Sleeping disorders Yeah and you'd hear/feel yourself choking at night. Sleep apnea. Generally in the old foggies or you'll notice it very early as a child.



14.(*8.)Post-traumatic subclinical seizure disorder: Again no.

15.(*9.)High mercury levels: I don't remember much about this one



16.(*10.)High manganese levels I don't know anything about this either



17.(*11.)Iron deficiency: No, a normal CBC will rule this out.



18.(*12.) B vitamin deficiencies:B6 makes GABA which is an inhibitory neural transmitter and you'd see stuff like tremors or other weird movements. B12 you'd see motor and sensation sort of tossed.


19.(*13.)Excessive amounts of Vitamins: This is so vague. Just don't take too many vitamins. Watch out for Vit E with any blood thinners (you'll bleed out).



20.(*14.)Tourette's syndrome: This one everyone thinks of coprolalia which isn't very common (10%) or so of tourette's. Think of OCD with tourette's more or less. You'd want to do something because it lowers your anxiety.



21.(*15.)Sensory Integration Dysfunction: What the heck is this?



22.(**1.)Early-onset diabetes: Again this is pretty dumb.


23.(**2.)Heart disease: I'd agree with this, but it's more in people who are either black and above 50 years old or for everyone else above 60 unless you have familial hypercholestrolemia/trglyceridemia/lipidemia.



24.(**3.)Cardiac conditions: It can reduce the supply of blood, oxygen and nutrients to the brain.


25.(**4.) Early-Onset Bi-Polar disorder:Also know as child-like Bi-polar. The experts state that 85% of children with child-like Bi-polar also meet the criteria for ADHD. The symptoms are extremely close. Most people when they think of Bi-polar disorder, think of Adult like Bipolar which mood swings happen over a somewhat long period of time. In child-like Bipolar, the mood swings can happen many times within a twenty-four hour day, known as rapid cycling. At one moment they're calm and the next minute they could be in a full fledge temper tantrum. Some of the symptoms are Distractibility, Hyperactivity, impulsivity, separation anxiety, restlessness, depressed mood, low self-esteem, and many more. Early-Onset Bi-polar should be ruled out before ADHD is considered mainly because they are treated with different medications if you choose medications that is. ADHD is treated with stimulant medications which will make a Bipolar child worse possibly psychotic.




26.(***1.)CAPD(Central Auditory processing Disorder) will sometimes occur in children who have had a history of ear infections and/or PE tubes. Symptoms include distractibility, inability to follow a set of verbal instructions, "space out", etc.


27.(***2.)Worms: Such as Pinworms lay their eggs in the anal area, causing tickling and itching, which are most bothersome at night. The lack of sleep from this type of infestation can cause crankiness or bad behavior during the day. When asleep, nightmares may be present. This problem is mostly found in very young children preschool to kindergarten because of primitive toileting skills, they tend to put their fingers in their mouths, and they participate in a lot of hands-on activities with other kids and with pets. Roundworms, hookworms, and tapeworms are other examples that can make a child display ADHD like symptoms. Worms cause hyperactive behavior, learning problems, depression, or attention deficits by making children miserable on the inside.


28.(***3.)Viral or bacterial infections:When a child is affected by an infection that might cause problem behavior.


29.(***4.)Malnutrition or improper diet: Many children in the United States do not eat a well balanced diet. A proper diet is necessary to growing children. An improper diet can affect a child's behavior in an ill way.





Oh crap I'm getting too lazy to finish the rest.
I'm sure this is apparent since I'm on this forum, but I have it too and it's pretty easy to recognize ADHD from the rest. Your physician will know.

sPacie~Gracie
07-11-10, 04:05 AM
Intresting? I display half of the list.... im hypothyriod (since 1996) I did hade difulcultiesb learning in school in school didn't get it repeated 4th grade humiliation and bullied by many. I was animic many times... iron deficiencyb and B vitamin definciency had really bad allergies too.. have a hard time learning and reading and understanding. Would need to read twice to get it. I go from one extreame to to another bipolar? But was told I'm not by 4 pychiatrist well its almost half of the list forgtot what was the rest.... so I have all that? Well I do know I tried treatment for all that but guess what I have ADD AND I m only taking that one and THE ONLY TREATMENT I NEEDED TO GET RID OF ALL THAT other CRAP THAT EVERY DANG DR. SAID I HAD with no change... now all that other stuff on the list was part of my uncificiant little brain could produce.... I feel better and all that what I was diagnose is GoNE!

KaiserBravery
07-20-10, 04:18 AM
Is it just me or does anyone else think that ADHD is really just a descriptor for the symptoms of 100s of biological "abonormalities".

When one is diagnosed and treated for ADHD they are really just treating the symptoms and not the actual cause.

If everyones ADHD symptoms were caused by the same condition then we could all be treated by the same medication.(obviously thats just not the case)

Hypothetically if everyones ADHD could be pinpointed to the individual causes and the medications were available we could all be cured of our symptoms..

PS. Id like to add narcolepsy to the list.

doramider7
09-04-10, 08:44 AM
Well, I suppose that would depend on how similar something has to be for you to consider it similar. Here's a post I made on the topic in another thread:

http://www.addforums.com/forums/showpost.php?p=273269&postcount=53

I don't agree that these symptoms are similar to ADHD.


Any sources for this?

The comment on the list you posted, particularly in context with many of the other comments, sounds like a chiropractic quack statement, but if we're talking about specific things like your example, I'd be interested in looking at it. My mother-in-law and a close friend have both disk problems and depression, and I'd like to see how they might be related.Thanks for the posting Speedo. Looking over the list, my first response was, hummm, that's interesting.

Then I found myself refuting or limiting each condition, line by line. Then I tried to identify the underlying flaw in the list.

Carla is spot on.

bumpey
09-21-10, 04:54 PM
Phew! glad i found this, so i don't have ADHD afterall, just a bunch of other nasty life threatining stuff.

doramide7
09-22-10, 10:21 PM
30.(***5.)Head injuries:Such as the postconcussion syndrome. Some of the symptoms include Irritability, emotionality, memory problems, depression, and sleep disturbances. A concussion can disrupt brain functioning causing ADHD like symptoms.


31.(***6.)Dietary Factors:(For example to much caffeine and sugar)At doses as low as 250 milligrams a day, a level many American children exceed- caffeine can cause rambling speech, attention and concentration problems, agitation, heart palpitations, insomnia, and hyperactive behavior. In a way, it is true we are what we eat.


32.(***7.) Some disorders such as anemias reduce oxygen to the brain causing disturbance in the brains chemistry causing ADHD like symptoms.




33.(***8.) Fetal alcohol syndrome(FAS) or Fetal alcohol effects (FAE): FAS is a name that doctors use to describe the damage done to children's brains and bodies when their mother drink heavily during pregnancy. It is the leading form of mental retardation today. Prenatal alcohol impairment, however, also comes in a milder form called fetal alcohol effects (FAE). Children with FAE often don't look disabled, and they tend to score in the low-normal or even normal range of intelligence. But these kids arent normal. Their mal-developed brains cause them to exhibit a wide range of behavior problems, including hyperactivity, attention problems, learning disorders, and ethical problems such as stealing, lying, and cheating.


34.(***9.)Intentionally or unintentionally sniffing materialssuch as modeling glue or other house hold products.
35.(***10.) Some drugs:, (both prescription and illegal) can cause the brain to atrophy, leading to disturbed cognition and behavior. If your child routinely takes prescription or over-the-counter medications for asthma, hay fever, allergies, headaches, or any other condition, consider the possibility that the drugs are causing or contributing to behavior problems.
36.(***11.):A beta-hemolytic streptococcus:(better known as "strep.") Although these bacteria are most commonly thought of as the cause of strep throat. Left untreated, strep can cause rheumatic fever and a movement disorder called Sydenham's chorea. Moreover, recurrent infections can lead, in susceptible children, to a group of symptoms collectively known as PANDAS (Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders) Some symptoms of PANDAS include obsessive-compulsive behavior, Tourette's syndrome, hyperactivity, cognitive problems, and fidgeting.


37.(***12.)Lack of exercise:"Hyper Couch Potatoes" are children who aren't moving enough. Some children because of lack of exercise may seem as though they are always in motion, but often that motion is in fits and spurts: leaping up from a chair, spinning around in the lunch line, bouncing in a chair while watching TV. Quite a few hyperactive children actually do not get enough sustained, strenuous exercise to stay healthy mentally and physically. Exercise can make people happier, less anxious, less hyperactive, and less depressed. One reason is that exercise increases serotonin levels in the brain exactly what Prozac, Elavil, and similar drugs do.


38.(***13.) Gifted Children: Gifted children often display ADHD like symptoms because most of the time they are bored with what other kids their age are doing. Behaviors associated with Giftedness are poor attention, boredom, daydreaming, low tolerance for persistence on tasks that seem irrelevant, their judgment often lags behind their development of intellect, their intensity may lead to power struggles with authorities, and they may have a high activity level. They may need less sleep compared to other children, and they may question rules, customs, and traditions. If your child scores above average on IQ tests, aces exams, has no trouble with homework, has no apparent learning disabilities, and primarily exhibits his or her problems mostly at school, maybe seeking a more challenging class or school would help.


39.(***14.)Emotional problems: Kids who are experiencing emotional problems most often display ADHD like symptoms. For example, kids who are constantly subjected to bullying at school can display ADHD like symptoms. These are normal kids that act out because they are scared. They experience sleeping problems, sadness, and they develop physical symptoms, especially if they think those symptoms will keep them home from school. Often they can't concentrate in class, partly because they are worried and partly because they are suffering from sleep deprivation. Really any emotional problem at school or home in which a child is having trouble coping with can result in ADHD like symptoms.


40.(***15.)Some kids are spoiled and undisciplined: A number of children labeled hyperactive are merely under-disciplined children. They tend to run their household and get away with anything. Dr Syndey Walker stated this problem best of why parents under-discipline their children. He stated that he blamed not the parents but on the psychological experts who have counseled parents for several decades that children are fragile, easily traumatized little flowers who could be ruined for life by a cross look or a scolding which is very untrue. Children need firm discipline and strict rules not abuse but setting rules and standards and demanding those standards be met, and giving consequences when your rules are broken. Labeling undisciplined kids as ADHD who are not gives them an excuse for their misbehavior, which will often make it worse.
41.(***16.)Spirited children:When dealing with spirited children the problem usually does not lie with the child but with society's perception of what normal childhood behavior is. Many normal children, according to some people, display ADHD like symptoms not because they are hyperactive or lack sufficient attention spans but because the person forming the opinion has unrealistic standards of how a child should behave.


42.(***17.)Lack of understanding and communication skills: One of the main reasons why a child acts out and throws temper tantrums when they have a problem is because of their lack of understanding of a problem and lack of expressing how they feel. Children do not have the vocabulary or know how to express their emotions like adults do, that's why many act out when they are in a difficult situation. They are not able tell you something is wrong so they show you instead. This is one reason why any emotional or medical problem can cause acting out behavior in children.






43.(Rare 1.)Early stage brain tumors: Found rarely in children but should still be considered. Statistically, this diagnosis may not be important but to individual families, they assuredly are.


44. (Rare 2.)Brain cysts:Another rare cause of hyperactivity but should still be considered when searching for the reasons behind displayed ADHD like behavior.


45. (Rare 3.) Temporal lobe seizures: The Temporal lobe is a part of the brain. Any brain malfunction can cause inappropriate behavior. That's why conducting brain scans is a must when trying to figure out behavior problems.


46. (Rare 4.) Klinefelter syndrom: A Genetic disorder in which a male has an extra X chromosome (XXY). Many individuals experience learning, behavior, and social problems. A degree of subnormal intelligence appears in some affected individuals. Many affected individuals are skinny and taller than most of their peers. A simple blood test can rule this disorder out.


47.(Rare 5.) Genetic Disorder XYY: The extra Y chromosome has been associated with antisocial behavior.


48. (Rare 6.) Porphyria: A hereditary enzyme-deficiency disease. Enzymes are very important to our body's chemical reactions. Really nothing occurs in our body without enzymes. A lack of enzymes causes body malfunctioning which can cause ill behavior.


49. (Rare 7.) Candida Albicans infestation(Yeast Infection) : Candida infestations cause hyperactivity in children. Most children who do suffer from Candida infestations have some underlying problem frequently an immune disorder, or a disorder affecting carbohydrate metabolism and thus altering blood sugar levels. So immune disorders can cause other problems that also have the same symptoms of ADHD.


50. (Rare 8.) Intestinal parasites:Parasites rob the body of needed nutrients which in-turn affects behavior.

Ever think that your adhd could have a cause that is curable ??

bumpey
09-23-10, 01:24 PM
And the list goes on, the more you hear about other conditions, the more you think you've got them, a common condition amongst medical and nursing students, its good to see one amongst us, probably lots more.

Tho I do like the Head Injury, Caffien and illegal drug use, as you'd have an idea of root cause there i think? hyercondriacts would love this.

Mignon
11-17-10, 03:54 PM
I do agree that amalgam fillings can't possibly lead to high mercury levels in the body.
Amalgam has a really low solubility and basically can't be absorbed into the blood in amonts that are detectable. Amazingly though, I've rad that the europeans have banned the use of amalgam dental fillings because of their mercury content.

That's not what certain scientific experiments demonstrate, like the one that resulted in the paper Whole-body imaging of the distribution of mercury released from dental fillings into monkey tissues by Lezek et. al

bof00
12-14-10, 04:27 PM
38. Gifted Children

Hmmm... how sound is that? My parents and teachers came to this conclusion when I was young. What about adults that score in the genius range? I always thought something is too boring if easy. But, I should still be able to do the boring stuff. I can't force myself to right now. Procrastination or even hours devising elimination of the menial task ensues.

Fortune
12-14-10, 05:26 PM
Being classified as gifted was a setback for me. I'm suspicious of the category.

sastarlite
01-12-11, 09:13 AM
One that I haven't seen is borderline personality disorder. The more I look at my boyfriend, and take into account that medication does not work for him, the more I see a borderline personality disorder.
This is what I found on at
http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/borderline-personality-disorder-fact-sheet/index.shtml
Symptoms
While a person with depression or bipolar disorder typically endures the same mood for weeks, a person with BPD may experience intense bouts of anger, depression, and anxiety that may last only hours, or at most a day. These may be associated with episodes of impulsive aggression, self-injury, and drug or alcohol abuse. Distortions in cognition and sense of self can lead to frequent changes in long-term goals, career plans, jobs, friendships, gender identity, and values. Sometimes people with BPD view themselves as fundamentally bad, or unworthy. They may feel unfairly misunderstood or mistreated, bored, empty, and have little idea who they are. Such symptoms are most acute when people with BPD feel isolated and lacking in social support, and may result in frantic efforts to avoid being alone.
People with BPD often have highly unstable patterns of social relationships. While they can develop intense but stormy attachments, their attitudes towards family, friends, and loved ones may suddenly shift from idealization (great admiration and love) to devaluation (intense anger and dislike). Thus, they may form an immediate attachment and idealize the other person, but when a slight separation or conflict occurs, they switch unexpectedly to the other extreme and angrily accuse the other person of not caring for them at all. Even with family members, individuals with BPD are highly sensitive to rejection, reacting with anger and distress to such mild separations as a vacation, a business trip, or a sudden change in plans. These fears of abandonment seem to be related to difficulties feeling emotionally connected to important persons when they are physically absent, leaving the individual with BPD feeling lost and perhaps worthless. Suicide threats and attempts may occur along with anger at perceived abandonment and disappointments.
People with BPD exhibit other impulsive behaviors, such as excessive spending, binge eating and risky sex. BPD often occurs together with other psychiatric problems, particularly bipolar disorder, depression, anxiety disorders, substance abuse, and other personality disorders.

I have bolded what I have experience wity my boyfriend in the 5 years we have been together. Does this ring a bell with anyone else?

mapster2
05-12-11, 06:36 PM
Good post, speedo. Right on the money.

Lebatron
11-02-11, 12:01 AM
Missing was Celiac's disease. Over on the Celiac's forum there is much talk about many of them suffering from ADD. Much like myself. Having this food allergy, if you want to call it that, leads to malnutrition. And malnutrition leads to what? You guessed it, poor mental function. With all the same symptoms of ADD like poor working memory, inability to ever maintain sustained effort, etc.

MismedicatdMess
12-22-11, 05:38 PM
Autistic Spectrum Disorders such as Aspergers and HFA. Thats a big one! Though often comorbid with ADHD and carrying similar symptoms... With the way that the ritalin inhibits verbal expression and shuts kids up at high enough doses, Not so sure how that goes down when it comes to the already impacted social development of kids with Autistic spectrum disorders. But I have a feeling it might be bad. I dont mean to be so blunt, but its important.

deeinsun
04-04-12, 04:44 PM
excellent got told over years you have over active thyroid, you have wheat allergy, 37 years in oh yes its adhd awesome thanks

Drewbacca
05-20-12, 12:53 AM
Ever think that your adhd could have a cause that is curable ??

ME :D

Yes! BUT, I'm pretty sure that I'll have to achieve a very high level of education in order to know enough to hold my doctor's accountable until we find that cause (assuming that there is one). It seems like it is up to the patient to fight for finding the truth... as most modern medicine will just write off the problems as either a) already diagnosed as ADHD, b) psycho-somatic, c)hypochondria, or d) some incurable syndrome or another that has not obvious biological mechanism so we'll just treat the symptoms and call it a day.
I really ******* hate modern medicine sometimes.

Thanks for the post. Still useful after all of these years! :thankyou:

dresser
12-30-12, 06:15 PM
If it walks like a duck-if it swims like a duck-if it Quaaks like duck then it must be a duck thier tryin to sluff somthing off.remember the old movies about africa and the witch doctor and his necklace of lions teeth (maybe before you're times) but nothing's changed all smoke and mirrors.it's to bad i'm going to heaven I wont' be abel to give them a peace of my mind

Subtract81
12-30-12, 08:41 PM
ADHD is a set of symptoms. Yes symptoms are ambiguous, but if you have the symptoms of adhd then by definition you have adhd, therefore this thread is based on a logical fallacy.

This thread does however further highlight why symptoms should not define diagnostics.

Mallory95959
02-27-13, 12:29 PM
I think the important thing to know is that there are a lot of things that can mimmic ADHD.
They ought to be ruled out early in the diagnostic process in order to avoid getting treated for the wrong illness.



The first thing I was tested for was metal poisioning. Along with that test the doc ordered blood sugar and thyroid... also with the usual blood tests in case I had allergies of some kind. They took 5 tubes of blood that day.

From there I followed up and discovered a hearing problem that was adding to my sensory troubles.

I was later diagnosed with ADHD combined type and anxiety disorder NOS. Now, I've been diagnosed with insomnia and sleep aphnia....and there is lots more to come.

ME :D

That is if you even presented enough of a problem to be considered at all. I was 27 before I sought treatment because all the adults in my life made excuses like this for not getting me checked out. She is so smart, she is just bored and not living up to potential. That is something I will never do to my son. It is important to get a full physical to rule out contributing factors but I think that this will lead more people to do nothing instead of have their child checked out. Most parents are tired and stressed and unless there is a significant issue they will do nothing. The schools too, unless you present a significant problem to the movement of the class a teacher will let you read novels from home all year. You slide through life until you hit a wall you have to deal with it all yourself. You talk about a myriad of possibilities and yes some of them are valid but this also goes to the problem of not having real ADHD taken seriously because it could be so many other things. People already look at us like there is something we could be doing about this to make our lives easier. We are just depressed or lacking sleep, exercise and nutrition. I have been doing everything I could to help myself feel normal from exercise to nutrition and supplements heavy metal cleansing and more. I have hearing problems and infections that have lasted for years but even when i didn't my ADHD symptoms didn't go away they got somewhat better because I didn't have the other stressors acting on my body and mind, but ADHD gone, no. I would like to know the sources of your information if this isn't just you own experiences talking but scientific evidence. Insomnia can also be a symptom of ADHD because your brain won't shut down, it just keeps going like the energizer bunny
I'm new to this sorry for the slight rant and personal emotionalism towards the subject but I have been though the "What about this and try this" for so long and dealt with so many people telling me it was this or another thing and once I was medicated and being treated I felt so much better. Its not a magic pill but If it is what your brain needs and you don't get it you can tell.
sorry for breaking any rules if i did...:D

non-hyper-adder
03-10-13, 02:09 AM
Fibromyalia symptoms have many crossover symptoms. I also had polio at age 2 (now 61). Chronic depression too. Five siblings also have fibro. ??

HXofADHD.W/F76
11-30-13, 12:23 PM
I thought I'd chime in here on the Vision Problems. This is tricky because there are binocular vision problems that can look like ADHD. The thing that complicates this is that there are a lot of people who have the two together. So it begs the question of "Are they related, maybe genetically?"

Convergence Insufficiency is the main binocular vision problem that kids or adults can have that mimics ADHD. The eyes don't have enough muscle power to adequately converge to allow clear comfortable reading. This ends up manifesting as inability to read for a long period of time, lack of interest, frustration etc. Typically the visual acuity is excellent with condition so a vision screening is not going to pick it up. Its a problem with how the eye work together. So you can see how that could look like ADHD. I will admit I am fascinated by this link between ADHD, binocular issues and dyslexia. I have all 3 so yes I have a vested interest.

RK_ADD
08-18-14, 04:42 AM
http://ocfoundation.org/default.aspx?id=3043
Do go through this link folks. It might not be ADHD/ADD especially if you are not a "impulsive/hyperactive one" (Inattentive ADD) & have the "ability to perform accurate and repetitive rituals ". Well, I Wouldn't call it as "OCD", Becuase then you wouldnt find many of the OCD symptoms as well. But the root cause for these ADD / OCD symptoms could be the anxiety caused by "Obsessive thoughts".

Tinatheawesome
02-09-15, 04:59 AM
Microcephaly which apparently I was diagnosed with because I had weird facial expression and a wrinkled forehead for thinking a lot about my problems which the doctor denies she puts on my record but, more than one neurologist said I am fine and my brain is normal. Its just I was small when I was born which no doctor knows why though.

Gypsy Willow
03-25-15, 10:33 AM
I personally feel ADD is a condition in and of itself but yes, other factors can worsen it. Like for example....I got like 3 hours of sleep last night and I can't focus to save my life right now.

*goes to get more coffee*

ahmeda
05-26-15, 02:16 AM
I would add hypogonadism for males: the lack of testosterone in bloodstream. Testosterone and dopamine are directly related. I have just been diagnosed as suffering hypogonadism. And I have very similar symptoms as in ADHD and I have been also diagnosed with ADD (ADHD-I). Just out of curiosity, I wonder if there can be some more fundamental in here between the root reason of ADHD?:scratch:

gothceltgirl
09-28-15, 04:41 PM
I have to agree about the iron. I don't know how in the world being iron-deficient or anemic can make that a thing. I used to be anemic and it didn't affect me in an ADHD like manner at all. I just felt sluggish and lethargic. Of course there are many things that can cause sluggishness and lethargy, but I won't go into that b/c that would be a whole dissertation.

But other things that make me feel sluggish and lethargic: sunlight, full-spectrum light (which mimics sunlight), vitamin D deficiency. I take vitamin D on a regular basis b/c I'm not a morning person and just hate being in the sun too much or too long.

dewrdr
07-25-16, 06:15 PM
1.(!1.) Hypoglycemia (Low Blood sugar) Low blood sugar can stem from thyroid disorders, liver or pancreatic problems, or adrenal gland abnormalities, or even an insufficient diet. Hypoglycemia can display the same ADHD like symptoms.

I have mild hypoglycemia from time to time due to my hormonal disorders. But I would say the symptoms are bit different and feel different.

2.(! 2.)Allergies: 15 to 20 percent of the world has some type of allergy. A person can be allergic to nearly anything so check for all forms. Food is one of the primary causes of allergic reactions. Just like the Car and human analogy stated above. If a child eats food they are allergic to, the body will not run properly and that may affect behavior. Everyone has different sensitivities to allergens so just because you aren't affected does not mean your child won't be also. (Some examples, Allergic reactions to food dye, milk, chocolate, and grains, ect.)

I do have some kind of allergy, just never done any tests.

3.(!3.) Learning disabilities: If the primary place of behavior problems is at school, learning disabilities may be the cause of ill behavior. One of the main things that affect a child's self-esteem is how well they do in school. If a child has an undiagnosed learning disorder that makes school much harder and sometimes impossible. Children with undiagnosed learning disabilities are labeled as lazy, stupid, and many other downgrading opinions that affect self-esteem. And many times when a child's self-esteem is at jeopardy they try to make up for it in other sometimes-nonproductive ways such as acting out, bullying, or becoming the class clown.

Do have it.

4.(!4.)Hyper or hypothyroidism:An imbalance in metabolism that occurs from an overproduction or underproduction of thyroid hormones. This imbalance may cause a variety of behaviors and may affect all body functions.

I suffer from hypothyroidism with occassional hyperthyroidism when it take a dose of meds that's too high. There is also an issue with my adrenal glands and or pituitary gland.

39.(***14.)Emotional problems: Kids who are experiencing emotional problems most often display ADHD like symptoms. For example, kids who are constantly subjected to bullying at school can display ADHD like symptoms. These are normal kids that act out because they are scared. They experience sleeping problems, sadness, and they develop physical symptoms, especially if they think those symptoms will keep them home from school. Often they can't concentrate in class, partly because they are worried and partly because they are suffering from sleep deprivation. Really any emotional problem at school or home in which a child is having trouble coping with can result in ADHD like symptoms.

Also.


42.(***17.) Lack of understanding and communication skills: One of the main reasons why a child acts out and throws temper tantrums when they have a problem is because of their lack of understanding of a problem and lack of expressing how they feel. Children do not have the vocabulary or know how to express their emotions like adults do, that's why many act out when they are in a difficult situation. They are not able tell you something is wrong so they show you instead. This is one reason why any emotional or medical problem can cause acting out behavior in children.

Checked.

br3akingchains
11-17-16, 03:01 PM
I'd like to add something specific to the metabolic disorders category... PKU and its variants (more importantly).

I was sick back in February and didn't have much to eat for three days...on the fourth day I felt like a million bucks. I had a similar occurrence of "clarity" , but not exactly the same , when I tried juicing for a week. Tried juicing again a second time and the results weren't the same.

I was injured at work back in march and have spent most of my free time since February trying to decipher my symptoms and ailments. I've tested a lot of theories only to be let down time and time again. I'm grateful, in a way, for that injury because it has allowed me a lot of time to try and connect the dots.

One disorder I found to share many of the symptoms of ADHD was an inborn error of metabolism. I specifically narrowed my reading to that because that was the one solid connection I had to my moments of clarity. food seems to play a role, and after seeing an allergist and GI doctor who said they couldn't help I narrowed it down to metabolism. There are so many things that can go wrong to either speed up or slow down (positive (sometimes) and negative effects) metabolic processes in the body.

PKU variants fit the bill to the T! It's not something I'm sure of, I see an endocrinologist on dec 5th.

PKU is a disorder involving the metabolism of phenylalanine, an essential Amino acid found in practically everything. People with the classic disease have very high levels of phenylalanine in their blood. High levels of phenylalanine are neurotoxic and cause irreversible brain damage. Most people with classic PKU have significant irreversible intellectual disabilities.

People with variant forms of the disease have varying levels of PAH deficiencies. Most of the symptoms are very similar to ADHD.

I think this can help explain why many come here and say they've cured their ADHD with diet changes. It also helps to explain why many suffer with fatigue and can't find a medicine that works.

Even if I end up having some form of PAH deficiency I'll probably still have "ADHD" due to any brain damage I've already suffered ( I've always been a lover of meat).

PKU is rare and the variants are probably less rare but rare nonetheless. The diet one must follow with a PAH deficiency is drastic, the most drastic I've encountered to date, but if I can feel and think like a million bucks everyday I'm all for it!!

Two great links on PAH/PKU

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4729111/#__abstractid795150title

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1504/#_pku_Summary_

br3akingchains
11-17-16, 03:40 PM
P.s. newborn screenings pick up many of the worst illnesses one can be born with but fail to account for variants. one might not get flagged for a variant because it hadn't been discovered at the time of the test or the disease was only thought to affect those who met a certain threshold, not something understood to affect a person incrementally based on the number they were looking at. Technology has improved and so has genetic testing. The number of genetic variations with the genes involved in phenylalanine metabolism alone is huge.

Btw, I was born in The Dominican Republic so I'm not even sure wether they did newborn screenings over there 36 years ago...self pay, on the spot medical care in a third world country, my mom was poor with an eighth grade education and I was an apparently healthy and exceedingly handsome baby boy.

Most blood tests will miss this because they're specifically looking at phenylalanine levels. An amino acid panel has to be ordered, I think it has to be specific to phenylalanine. Most doctors won't even know about it because they only discussed it in med school (classical PKU) and probably aren't caught up on variants.

This is something to look into If you're foggy all the time, tired and a vegetarian or vegan diet seemed to help in the past. I specifically noticed my meds worked better when fasting and didn't seem to work at all otherwise.

BBSurf37
12-12-16, 09:42 PM
@barbyma. Thank you for pointing out all these "other" possibilities to the OP. This list reads as a anti-psych propaganda in an odd way. Most of these conditions can be easily eliminated due to it being environmental. ADHD has been very clear on it's Dx and who does and does NOT have it. If anybody where I'm living at had chronic exposure to lead, we would have the EPA running around like crazy treating everyone like they have been exposed to radiation. Most of the conditions I read are somewhat temporal. Yeah I'm thankful for some of the info but just questioning the OP's motive for this post.

Josephina
11-09-17, 03:45 PM
Another condition to consider adding to the list: Post Traumatic Stress Disorder brought about by chronic childhood abuse and complex trauma. (Here's my thread on this in the adult diagnosis section of the forum: http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=188764 )

There's a lot of symptom overlap that's worth noting.

Hazel87
11-15-17, 11:20 PM
Autistic Spectrum Disorders such as Aspergers and HFA. Thats a big one! Though often comorbid with ADHD and carrying similar symptoms... With the way that the ritalin inhibits verbal expression and shuts kids up at high enough doses, Not so sure how that goes down when it comes to the already impacted social development of kids with Autistic spectrum disorders. But I have a feeling it might be bad. I dont mean to be so blunt, but its important.

Meh, I am ASD (formerly known as aspergers or HFA, which are now all under the autism spectrum level 1 diagnosis) and ADD and like many other people on the autism spectrum, I find that my stimulant medication helps me a lot with aspects of autism. It helps me socially and helps me with verbal communication. Everyone on the autism spectrum is different, so meds affect us all differently, which is why it's considered a spectrum "disorder". Some people with high functioning autism (this is actually an offensive term to use tbh, but I've had trouble finding another word) can actually be very talkative and verbally expressive, especially boys/men it seems. Autism can affect verbal speech in different ways, and not everyone on the spectrum has obvious difficulty with verbal communication. :)

It's true that ASD and ADD are often co-occurring diagnoses, and there is some symptom overlap. I was diagnosed ADD way before I was diagnosed ASD - unfortunately this is very common in girls. Boys tend to receive an ASD diagnosis by age 8 whereas women tend not to be diagnosed until adulthood. I think there is especially overlap in certain areas of sensory processing with ADD. Not in the way and to the level that autistics experience obviously but I do think there are common roots.

Overall though, there are definitely key indicators that are present in ASD and not ADHD, or at least key indicators that all present in a cluster. Someone with ADD might present similar symptoms to ASD, and maybe they'll struggle with social rules etc but if you have someone who has the overlapping symptoms ADD and ASD share but also has a cluster of ASD specific symptoms like moderate verbal issues (non-verbal or late talking), lack of eye contact, repetitive behaviours, narrow obsessive interests, sensory integration issues, stimming etc than that's likely to be something more than ADD alone.

Also, from what I've read of ADD and seen of it in others, even though some people with ADD may have a desire for rigid routine and even respond well when they're forced into it, they struggle to keep a rigid routine going whereas rigid routines are typical in ASD.

I do agree though that with really HFA, where a lot of the key indicators of ASD are either less present or less apparent (or hidden and masked, which is common the older they get) I definitely think that there is a lot of autism being misdiagnosed as ADD and other diagnoses, particularly in girls.

Some of these other things I've seen suggested in this thread are things that tend to begin later on in later. ADD is a neurodevelopmental condition, therefore it has to begin in early childhood. So, if one does not experience symptoms of ADD until they're older, it's likely not ADD. Could be trauma, mental health, etc etc but if it didn't begin in early childhood, it's not ADD. I think that's important to remember.

Fortune
11-16-17, 12:07 AM
Everyone who was diagnosed with Asperger's does not fit under "autism spectrum disorder level 1". Part of the problem with the existence of AS as a diagnosis was the assumption that it meant mild symptoms. This is not always the case.

Kunga Dorji
11-26-17, 12:19 PM
http://adhdparentssupportgroup.homestead.com/50conditionsmimicingADHD.html

!1.)Hypoglycemia (Low Blood sugar)Low blood sugar can stem from thyroid disorders, liver or pancreatic problems, or adrenal gland abnormalities, or even an insufficient diet. Hypoglycemia can display the same ADHD like sypmtoms. 2.(! 2.)Allergies: 15 to 20 percent of the world has some type of allergy. A person can be allergic to nearly anything so check for all forms. Food is one of the primary causes of allergic reactions. Just like the Car and human analogy stated above. If a child eats food they are allergic to, the body will not run properly and that may affect behavior. Everyone has different sensitivities to allergens so just because you aren't affected does not mean your child won't be also.



3.(!3.)Learning disabilities: If the primary place of behavior problems is at school, learning disabilities may be the cause of ill behavior. One of the main things that affect a child's self-esteem is how well they do in school. If a child has an undiagnosed learning disorder that makes school much harder and sometimes impossible. Children with undiagnosed learning disabilities are labeled as lazy, stupid, and many other downgrading opinions that affect self-esteem.



4.(!4.)Hyper or hypothyroidism:An imbalance in metabolism that occurs from an overproduction or underproduction of thyroid hormones. This imbalance may cause a variety of behaviors and may affect all body functions.


5.(! 5.) Hearing and vision problems: If a child can't see or hear properly, school and daily things in life are nearly impossible and it may cause ADHD like symptoms especially in educational settings.


6.(!6.)Mild to high lead levels, even in the absence of clinical lead poisoning: research shows that children with even mildly elevated lead levels suffer from reduced IQs, attention deficits, and poor school performance. Lead is the leading culprit in toxin-caused hyperactivity..


7.(*1.)Spinal Problems: Some spinal problems can cause ADHD like symptoms because if the spine is not connected to the brain properly nerves from the spinal cord can give the brain all of signals at once making a child rambunctious and always on the go.


8.(*2.) Toxin exposures: Children are more vulnerable to toxins than adults. Such as pesticide-poisoning (Eating vegetables and fruit not washed thoroughly, they can be exposed to them by playing outside on the ground), also by gasoline fumes, and herbicides. Inside there are also many toxins. Disinfectants, furniture polishes and air fresheners are toxins that can affect some children's behaviors. Beds and carpets are one of the most dangerous places in the house because they are full of different types of dust, and other toxins. Toxins can cause hyperactivity, attention deficits, irritability, and learning problems.


9.(*3.)Carbon Monoxide poisoning: Thousands of children each year are exposed to toxic levels of this gas each year. Sources include gas heaters, and other gas appliances such as fireplaces, dryers, and water heaters.


10.(*4.)Seizure disorders: The most overlooked is the absence Seizures. During an absence seizure, the brain's normal activity shuts down. The child stares blankly, sometimes rotates his eyes upward, and occasionally blinks or jerks repetitively, he drops objects from his hand, and there may be some mild involuntary movements known as automatisms. The attack lasts for a few seconds and then it is over as rapidly as it begins. If these attacks occur dozens of times each day, they can interfere with a child's school performance and be confused by parents and teachers with daydreaming.


11.(*5.)Metabolic disorders: They reduce the brain's supply of glucose, the bodies fuel and can cause ADHD like symptoms.


12. (*6.)Genetic defects: Some mild forms of genetic disorders can go unnoticed in children and display some of the same symptoms of ADHD. Mild forms of Turner's syndrome, sickle-cell anemia, and Fragile X syndrome are some examples. Almost any genetic disorder can cause hyperactivity or other behavior problems, even if the disorder isn't normally linked to such problems. Many genetic diseases disrupt brain functions directly, through a variety of paths.

13.(*7.) Sleeping disorders or other problems causing fatigue and crankiness during the day.


14.(*8.)Post-traumatic subclinical seizure disorder: It causes episodic temper explosions. These fits of temper come out of the blue for no reason. Some of these seizures can be too subtle to detect without a twenty-four-hour electroencephalogram (EEG).
15.(*9.)High mercury levels:One of the most interesting things regarding high mercury levels is that it can relate to dental fillings. Children who have mercury amalgam fillings in their mouth and grind their teeth are at risk of high mercury levels. American dental associations are defensive on the subject of mercury fillings but many European countries have discontinued the use of them because of side effects.



16.(*10.)High manganese levels


17.(*11.)Iron deficiency:Iron is an essential component of hemoglobin, the oxygen carrying pigment in the blood. Iron is normally obtained through the food in the diet and by the recycling of iron from old red blood cells. The causes of iron deficiency are too little iron in the diet, poor absorption of iron by the body, and loss of blood. It is also caused by lead poisoning in children.


18.(*12.) B vitamin deficiencies:Many experts believe that one of the main causes for inattention, hyperactivity, impulsivity, temper tantrums, sleep disorders, forgetfulness, and aggression are caused by faulty neurotransmissions a problem with the neurotransmitters in the brain. Vitamin B-6 is a necessary vitamin used in the making of neurotransmitters that affect behavior.


19.(*13.)Excessive amounts of Vitamins: Excessive amounts of vitamins can be toxic to the body and may cause the same ADHD like symptoms. It is possible to overdose when taking vitamins so make sure you contact a physician and check for vitamin deficiencies before taking extra vitamins.


20.(*14.)Tourette's syndrome: Tourette's syndrome is a rare but disruptive condition. It involves multiple tics (small, repetitive muscle movements), usually facial tics with grimacing and blinking. Tics may also occur in the shoulders and arms. This is usually accompanied by loud vocalizations, which may include grunts or noises, or uncontrollable (compulsive) use of obscenities or short phrases. The tics are worse during emotional stress and are absent during sleep. The cause is unknown. It occurs most often in boys, and may begin around age 7 or 8 or not until the child is in his or her late teens or early twenties. It may, at times, run in families. This disorder can be mistaken for not being able to sit still or impulsive behavior.


21.(*15.)Sensory Integration Dysfunction: Sensory Integration Dysfunction is the inefficient neurological processing of information received through the senses, causing problems with learning, development, and behavior. These children are over-sensitive or under-sensitive dealing in touch, taste, smell, sound, or sight. For example, some of these children crave fast and spinning movement, such as swinging, rocking, twirling, and riding the merry-go-round- without getting dizzy. These children may move constantly, fidget, enjoy getting into upside down positions and be a daredevil. These children may become overexcited when there is too much to look at words, toys, or other children. They may cover their eyes, have poor eye contact, be inattentive when drawing or doing desk work, or overreact to bright light. These children often act out in an attempt to cope with their inability to process sensory information such as acting out in crowded or loud places.


22.(**1.)Early-onset diabetes:Symptoms include aggression, depression, and anxiety. If you have a family history of diabetes checking for this is a must.


23.(**2.)Heart disease: It affects blood and oxygen flow to the brain affecting brain function that in-turn affects behavior.


24.(**3.)Cardiac conditions: It can reduce the supply of blood, oxygen and nutrients to the brain.


25.(**4.) Early-Onset Bi-Polar disorder:Also know as child-like Bi-polar. The experts state that 85% of children with child-like Bi-polar also meet the criteria for ADHD. The symptoms are extremely close. Most people when they think of Bi-polar disorder, think of Adult like Bipolar which mood swings happen over a somewhat long period of time. In child-like Bipolar, the mood swings can happen many times within a twenty-four hour day, known as rapid cycling. At one moment they're calm and the next minute they could be in a full fledge temper tantrum. Some of the symptoms are Distractibility, Hyperactivity, impulsivity, separation anxiety, restlessness, depressed mood, low self-esteem, and many more. Early-Onset Bi-polar should be ruled out before ADHD is considered mainly because they are treated with different medications if you choose medications that is. ADHD is treated with stimulant medications which will make a Bipolar child worse possibly psychotic.




26.(***1.)CAPD(Central Auditory processing Disorder) will sometimes occur in children who have had a history of ear infections and/or PE tubes. Symptoms include distractibility, inability to follow a set of verbal instructions, "space out", etc.


27.(***2.)Worms: Such as Pinworms lay their eggs in the anal area, causing tickling and itching, which are most bothersome at night. The lack of sleep from this type of infestation can cause crankiness or bad behavior during the day. When asleep, nightmares may be present. This problem is mostly found in very young children preschool to kindergarten because of primitive toileting skills, they tend to put their fingers in their mouths, and they participate in a lot of hands-on activities with other kids and with pets. Roundworms, hookworms, and tapeworms are other examples that can make a child display ADHD like symptoms. Worms cause hyperactive behavior, learning problems, depression, or attention deficits by making children miserable on the inside.


28.(***3.)Viral or bacterial infections:When a child is affected by an infection that might cause problem behavior.


29.(***4.)Malnutrition or improper diet: Many children in the United States do not eat a well balanced diet. A proper diet is necessary to growing children. An improper diet can affect a child's behavior in an ill way.




Hi Speedo (if you are till here). I have a bone to pick with this list of conditions that mimic ADHD. If you closely inspect the DSM introduction and FAQs you will find that DSM makes no attempt to attribute cause. All it does is list clusters of behavioural syndromes that show similar characteristics.

So a child can have symptoms caused by one of your proposed causes, and still have ADHD - because they still fulfill the criteria listed in the diagnosis. The ONLY exclusions accepted are ADHD symptoms that occur solely in the active phase of other DSM psych disorders
DSM V states:



The symptoms do not occur exclusively during the course of schizophrenia or another psychotic disorder and are not better explained by another mental disorder (e.g., mood disorder, anxiety disorder, dissociative disorder, personality disorder, substance intoxication or withdrawal).




Note that complex childhood trauma is not yet a recognised DSM diagnosis.

So the majority of the interesting and relevant list you presented is not in fact a list of alternatives to an ADHD diagnosis, it is a list of reasons for an ADHD diagnosis.