View Full Version : A MUST READ!!! Top Five Emotional Difficulties of Adults with LD


Andi
04-12-06, 10:04 PM
I found this today and I think it truly helps many of us understand and appreciate what the LD student/adult goes through emotionally. It's something that many of us need to remember from time to time...WE are not alone!!! Looking through the list I believe all of us can identify with many points in our own disorders. As forum members we need to remember this when addressing/communicating with others.





1. Shame

People growing up with a learning disability often feel a sense of shame. For some, it is a great relief to receive the diagnosis while for others the label only serves to further stigmatize them. For many adults, especially older adults, an accurate diagnosis was unavailable. These individuals were frequently labeled as mentally retarded, written off as being unable to learn, and most passed through the school system without acquiring basic academic skills.

Sadly, these feelings of shame often cause the individual to hide their difficulties. Rather than risk being labeled as stupid or accused of being lazy, some adults deny their learning disability as a defense mechanism. Internalized negative labels of stupidity and incompetence usually result in a poor self concept and lack of confidence (Gerber, Ginsberg, & Reiff, 1992)

Some adults feel ashamed of the type of difficulties they are struggling to cope with such as basic literacy skills, slow processing, attention difficulties, chronic forgetfulness, organizational difficulties, etc.

The following myths about learning disabilities have perpetuated the general public’s negative perception about learning disabilities:

Myth #1

People with learning disabilities have below average intelligence and cannot learn.

Fact

People with learning disabilities have average to above average intelligence (Gerber. 1998). In fact, studies indicate that as many as 33% of students with LD are gifted (Baum, 1985; Brody & Mills, 1997; Jones, 1986). With proper recognition, intervention and lots of hard work, children and adults with learning disabilities can learn and succeed!

Myth #2

Learning disabilities are just an excuse for irresponsible, unmotivated or lazy people.

Fact

Learning disabilities are caused by neurological impairments not character flaws. In fact, the National Information Centre for Adults and Youth with Disabilities makes a point of saying that people with learning disabilities are not lazy or unmotivated (NICHCY , 2002).

Myth #3

Learning disabilities only affect children. Adults grow out of learning disabilities.

Fact

It is now known that LD continues throughout the individual’s lifespan and “may even intensify in adulthood as tasks and environmental demands change” (Michaels, 1994a). Sadly, many adults, especially older adults, have never been formally diagnosed with a learning disability. In fact, the majority of people with learning disabilities are not diagnosed until they reach adulthood (LDA, 1996)

Myth #4

Dyslexia and learning disability are the same thing.

Fact

Dyslexia is a type of learning disability. It is not a another term for learning disability. It is a specific language based disorder affecting a person’s ability to read, write and verbally express themselves. Unfortunately, careless use of the term has expanded it so that it has become, for some, an equivalent for "learning disability".

Myth #5

Learning disabilities are only academic in nature. They do not affect other areas of a person’s life.

Fact

Some people with learning disabilities have isolated difficulties in reading, writing or mathematics. However, most people with learning disabilities have more than one area of difficulty. Dr. Larry Silver asserts that "learning disabilities are life disabilities". He writes, “The same disabilities that interfere with reading, writing, and arithmetic also will interfere with sports and other activities, family life, and getting along with friends." (Silver, 1998)

Typically, students with LD have other major difficulties in one or more of the following areas:

* motor coordination
* time management
* attention
* organizational skills
* processing speed


* Social skills needed to make friends and maintaining relationships
* emotional maturation
* verbal expression
* memory



Many adults with learning disabilities have difficulty in performing basic everyday living tasks such as shopping, budgeting, filling out a job application form or reading a recipe. They may also have difficulty with making friends and maintaining relationships. Vocational and job demands create additional challenges for young people with learning disabilities.

Myth #6

Adults with learning disabilities cannot succeed in higher education.

Fact

More and more adults with learning disabilities are going to college or university and succeeding (Gerber and Reiff 1994). With the proper accommodations and support, adults with learning disabilities can be successful at higher education.

2. Fear

Another emotional difficulty for adults with learning disabilities is fear. This emotion is often masked by anger or anxiety. Tapping into the fear behind the anger and/or the anxiety response is often the key for adults to cope with the emotional fallout of learning disabilities.

Feelings of fear may be related one or more of the following issues:

* fear of being found out
* fear of failure
* fear of judgment or criticism
* fear of rejection

Fear of Being Found Out

Many adults with learning disabilities live with fear of being found out. They develop coping strategies to hide their disability. For example, an adult who can hardly read might pretend to read a newspaper. Other adults may develop gregarious personalities to hide their difficulties or focus on other abilities that do not present learning barriers. Unfortunately some adults will have developed negative strategies such as quitting their job rather than risking the humiliation of being terminated because their learning disability makes it difficult for them to keep up with work demands.

The fear of being found out is particularly troublesome for many older adults who have never been diagnosed with a learning disability or those who received inappropriate support. Such adults were frequently misdiagnosed with mental retardation, inappropriately placed in programs for the mentally disabled, and/or stigmatized by teachers and classmates. In later life, these adults often return to learning through adult literacy programs in order make up for lost educational opportunities. Seeking help is a difficult step forward for these adults because it requires them to stop hiding their disability. The simple act of entering a classroom can be an anxiety producing experience for adults who have been wrongly labeled and/or mistreated by the educational system. For these adults, returning to a learning environment is truly an act of courage!

Low literacy skills and academic difficulties are not the only type of learning disabilities adults try to hide. Adults with social skill difficulties may live in constant fear of revealing social inadequacies. For example, an adult who has trouble understanding humour, may pretend to laugh at a joke even through they don’t understand it. They may also hide their social difficulties by appearing to be shy and withdrawn. On the other hand, hyperactive adults may cover up their attention difficulties by using a gregarious personality to entertain people.

Fear of Failure

The National Adult Literacy Survey, 1992, found that 58% of adult with self-reported learning disabilities lacked the basic functional reading and writing skills needed to experience job and academic success (Kirsch, 1993). Most of these adults have not graduated high school due to the failure of the school system to recognize and/or accommodate their learning disability. Needless to say, adult literacy programs are a second chance to learn the basic academic skills missed out in public school. As mentioned above, going back into an educational environment is often a fearful experience for adults with learning disabilities. One of the main reasons for this is the fear of failure. Many adults reason that, if they have failed before, what is to stop them failing again and, if they do fail again, then this failure must mean they, themselves, are failures.. The tendency for adults with learning disabilities to personalize failure (i.e. failure makes ME a failure) is perhaps the biggest self-esteem buster for adult learners. Educators need to be aware of these fears to help learner’s understand that failure does not make them a failure and making mistakes is a part of the learning process.

For most people, anxiety about failing is what motivates them to succeed, but for people with learning disabilities this anxiety can be paralyzing. Fear of failure may prevent adults with learning disabilities from taking on new learning opportunities. It might prevent them from participating in social activities, taking on a new job opportunity or enrolling in an adult education course.

One positive characteristic that often helps adults overcome their fear of failure is their ability to come up with innovative strategies to learn and solve problems. These strategies are often attributed to the “learned creativity” that many adults with learning disabilities develop in order to cope with the vocational , social and educational demands in their everyday lives. (Gerber, Ginsberg,& Reiff, 1992).

Fear of Ridicule

Adults with learning disabilities frequently fear the ridicule of others. Sadly, these fears often develop after the individual has been routinely ridiculed by teachers, classmates or even family members. The most crushing of these criticisms usually relates to a perceived lack of intelligence or unfair judgments about the person’s degree of motivation or ability to succeed. For example, comments such as “you’ll never amount to anything”, “you could do it if you only tried harder”, or the taunting of classmates about being “in the mental retard class” have enormous emotional effects on individuals with learning disabilities. For many of these adults, especially those with unidentified learning disabilities, these and other negative criticisms, continue to affect their emotional well-being into their adult years. It is not uncommon for adults to internalize the negative criticisms and view themselves as dumb, stupid, lazy, and/or incompetent. Such negative criticisms often fuel the fear adults with learning disabilities have about being found out.

Fear of Rejection

Adults with learning disabilities frequently fear rejection if they are not seen to be as capable as others. If they come from a middle to upper class family where academic achievement is a basic expectation for its members, fear of rejection may be a very real concern. They may also fear that their social skill deficits will preclude them from building meaningful relationships with others and may lead to social rejection. Prior experiences of rejection will likely intensify this sense of fear.

3. Environmental and Emotional Sensitivity

Environmental Sensitivities

Adults are often overwhelmed by too much environmental stimuli (e.g. background noise, more than one person talking at a time, side conversations, reading and listening at the same time). Many people with LD and ADD have specific sensitivities to their environment such as certain fabrics they cannot wear, foods they cannot tolerate, etc.

Emotional Sensitivity

Many adults with learning disabilities see themselves as more emotionally sensitive than other people In its most extreme form, high levels of emotional sensitivity are both a blessing and a weakness. The positive features of this trait helps adults with learning disabilities build meaningful relationships with others. For example, they are often very intuitive and in-tune with both their own and other people's emotions. Sometimes they are actually able to perceive other's thoughts and feelings. However, this strength also serves as weakness due to its propensity to overwhelm the individuals. Emotional difficulties occur when they are unable to cope with the onslaught of emotions they are feeling. Highly sensitive adults with LD may be moved to tears more easily or feel their own and other people’s pain more deeply. For example, Thomas West, writer of "The Minds Eye", not only gives a thorough explanation of Winston Churchill's learning disability, but also describes his sensitive nature. West details Churchill's tendency to break into tears quite easily" (West, 1997) even out in the public eye. He notes one incident in which Churchill was moved to tears after witnessing the devastating effects of a bomb.

This description of Churchill also serves to highlight the strong sense of justice that many adults with learning disabilities possess. Unfortunately, this sense of justice often serves as a double edged sword. On one hand, it is refreshing to behold the passion of many of these individuals in their fight to overcome injustice. While on the other hand, this very passion, when it crosses the line into aggression, can cause social rejection and/or emotional overload. Often the individual may be unaware that their behavior has turned aggressive. They only wish make their point known and have others understand it. This type of over reaction is not a purposeful attempt to hurt anybody. It is more likely to be caused by a difficulty with monitoring their emotions and consequent behavior.

4. Emotional Regulation

Difficulties with regulating emotions are common for highly sensitive adults with learning disabilities. Dr. Kay Walker, describes the connection between learning disabilities and self-regulation problems in her paper “Self Regulation and Sensory Processing for Learning, Attention and Attachment”. She asserts that self-regulation problems frequently occur in those with learning disabilities (Walker, 2000) In its most extreme form, individual may easily shift from one emotion to the next. Others may experience difficulty regulating impulsive thoughts or actions.

Fortunately, most adults have learned to handle their emotional sensitivity to avoid becoming overwhelmed or engaging in negative social interactions. Nevertheless, some adults may be so deeply affected that they become depressed or suffer from anxiety. A lack of school, job and/or social success will likely add to this emotional burden. Some adults with LD, especially those who have been ridiculed by their family members, teachers and/or peers, may be more apt to take criticism to heart because of their experiences and/or their ultra-sensitive nature. Emotional wounds from childhood and youth may cause heightened emotional responses to rejection. In turn, social anxiety and social phobia may result

5. Difficulty Adjusting to Change

Change is scary for everyone, but for people with learning disabilities and other neurological disabilities, change may be particularly difficult. Children with learning disabilities may prefer procedures to stay the same and have a hard time moving from one activity to another. Usually this difficulty becomes less of an issue as the child matures. However, adults with learning disabilities may still experience difficulty adjusting to change in more subtle ways . For example, some adults will have trouble moving from one work task to another without completely finishing the first task before moving on to the next one. Adults with learning disabilities are frequently described as inflexible when it comes to considering another person’s view point or a different way of doing something.

Adjustment to change is difficult for adults with LD because change brings the unexpected. In general, people with learning disabilities are less prepared for the unexpected. The unexpected may bring new learning hurdles, new job demands or new social challenges. Since all these areas can be affected by learning disabilities, it is no wonder why change can produce so much anxiety for adults with learning disabilities.

To avoid the tendency to blame the person for their lack of flexibility, it is important to understand the neurological basis for this difficulty with adjusting to change. With this said, through social skills practice, adults with learning disabilities can improve their ability to tolerate change. In addition, parents, instructors, and other professionals can help adults with learning disabilities by making transition processes easier through understanding and accommodating the adults’ needs.



http://www.ldpride.net/emotions.htm

ms_sunshine
04-12-06, 10:35 PM
Thank you so very much for providing this information, Andi. I think it's something ALL of our forum guests and members should see.

I have dried the tears of TOO MANY students who were treated as if they were stupid, lazy, or inferior by their peers. The sad thing is these cruel children grow up to be thoughtless adults who carry on their ignorance of what learning disabled means into their professions.

I can only hope that everyone who comes here leaves this thread learning some patience, compassion, and empathy for those people in our world who are every bit as intelligent, and who FEEL the unfair stigma of a learning disability every day.

Nova
04-12-06, 11:37 PM
Thanks Andi !!


Dyslexia and learning disability are the same thing.

Fact

Dyslexia is a type of learning disability. It is not a another term for learning disability. It is a specific language based disorder affecting a person’s ability to read, write and verbally express themselves. Unfortunately, careless use of the term has expanded it so that it has become, for some, an equivalent for "learning disability".



Fear of Ridicule

Adults with learning disabilities frequently fear the ridicule of others. The most crushing of these criticisms usually relates to a perceived lack of intelligence or unfair judgments about the person’s degree of motivation or ability to succeed..... Such negative criticisms often fuel the fear adults with learning disabilities have about being found out.


Ask me again, why I don't lend out my books to anyone....when I highlight almost everything in a paragraph because it's difficult for me to read it- and have a slew of information in the margins, pertaining to the 'points' of the paragraph- which goes hand in hand with 'a perceived lack of intelligence', even if I wanted to lend them out.


Emotional Sensitivity

Many adults with learning disabilities see themselves as more emotionally sensitive than other people In its most extreme form, high levels of emotional sensitivity are both a blessing and a weakness. The positive features of this trait helps adults with learning disabilities build meaningful relationships with others. For example, they are often very intuitive and in-tune with both their own and other people's emotions. Sometimes they are actually able to perceive other's thoughts and feelings. However, this strength also serves as weakness due to its propensity to overwhelm the individuals. Emotional difficulties occur when they are unable to cope with the onslaught of emotions they are feeling. Highly sensitive adults with LD may be moved to tears more easily or feel their own and other people’s pain more deeply.

I don't know about 'others' but I'm know, I'm 'in tune' with other's true state of 'emotional suffering'. And it does affect me tremendously.

casper
04-12-06, 11:38 PM
Wish I could have taken this to school with me many years ago.

Nova
04-13-06, 12:32 AM
Stop 'wishin' and just send me one of the best Tirimisu cakes you can whip up. (0:

Crazygirl79
04-13-06, 01:19 AM
I KNOW this feeling as I've been there my whole life.....yes I'm mildly learning disabled

casper
04-13-06, 12:37 PM
How am i suppose to mail u terimisu!

Scattered
04-13-06, 01:10 PM
Excellent article, Andi! Thanks so much for sharing it!

Scattered

Nova
04-13-06, 01:18 PM
How am i suppose to mail u terimisu!
Casper,
I don't know...find a way...I get a King Cake 'mailed' whenever I'm too lazy to make it myself, every now and again. (0:

dormammau2008
04-14-06, 09:20 PM
thank you andaw good info an good thread its nice to know a froums looks after all on its site ;.))))) dorm

Andrew
04-14-06, 10:04 PM
Excellent article you posted, Andi :)

Christiana
04-17-06, 09:19 PM
thanks Andi! this was great. I identify with all of it.

lotsofconfusion
04-19-06, 01:42 AM
Yes, I agree, an excellent article. These past couple of days have been awful, and this pretty much explains much of whats happened, and why. Most of it I know but it's nice to have a reminder! I wish everyone else could read this. Thank you so much!!

dormammau2008
04-19-06, 10:44 PM
lotsofve contiion? why whats been bad about the last couple ofve days???? and yeh its a good peace ofve info andi done dorm

genralsanders
05-14-06, 08:35 PM
that pretty much sums it all up.

auntchris
05-20-06, 06:58 PM
Thanks Andi for the great article. I am going to print it out and show my therapist. May be I can get better accommodation on college this yr. Thanks again.

bambo28
06-05-06, 04:05 PM
Well I am 33 yrs old and have 3 wonderful kids. I was in LD classes from 5th grade till I graduated. I just thought that I was stupid or dum. No I am not. I have been in and out of depression for a long time now. I have a social phobia, panic attacks and have been made fun of in school so much. That does do something to someones life. I have read all of your posts and I feel ok now. My 8 yr old daughter is going throw the same thing. The school said that she was mildly retarted. Oh my god, why would they say that. She can't pay attention in shcool and so on. Well I am so glad that I found this site. There are so many other things that happend in my life but that would take to much space and I won't bore you with that. But I am looking to help her and my son is going in that direction I would take all the help I can. I am able to do things just like you all here. Oh my I thought I was alone. Well thank you for reading. :)

Captain Da Da
06-06-06, 09:37 PM
I have Attention Deficit Disorder and bi-polar and Identified with a lot of this (except dyslexia. I never have had too much trouble with reading. Is there such a thing as Math dyslexia?)

I am 30 years old and still attend college. I have been called "immature" and "retarded" by people on the internet. I have had to not work while studying and have had people tell me that I should stop wasting the government's money and get a job and stop pursing my art degree. Art was what got me through some of my trials and tribulations. I do not understand how someone can just get behind a keyboard and totally be allowed to tell someone how awful they must feel and not be reprimanded for it. That's why I like this site so much, you guys really do a good job at making this a community.

My only complaint...

I wish people would post more often, some of you are really cool.:D

CtPryncess
07-31-06, 06:51 PM
I have always had a learning dissibility, as long as I can remember. As a child it affecting my school and as an adult it affects my obtaining a job with a decent pay. It angers and frustrates me at the same time. I know that I can do better at this but I also feel helpless. When I think about my future, I get depressed because I know that the disgusting job I have will be my future. If I do change jobs, it will be yet another low paying job.

VisualImagery
07-31-06, 07:19 PM
I do not understand how someone can just get behind a keyboard and totally be allowed to tell someone how awful they must feel and not be reprimanded for it. That's why I like this site so much, you guys really do a good job at making this a community.

My only complaint...

I wish people would post more often, some of you are really cool.:D
Thanks DaDa, that is a wonderful compliment and I know a lot of people here who need to hear that more often.

I find this a good place. We do make our mistakes but a PM is i great place to apologize. The admins and mods do a great job of keeping this forum a safe supportive place. We are glad to have you here.

What would you like to know more about? We are very neurologically diverse here and have a large neural pool of experience, intelligence, and caring people. Join us often, we are serious when needed and a lot of fun. Try the chit-chat forum to get to know us better with our hair down.

RADDmom GLADD to have you!

VisualImagery
07-31-06, 07:26 PM
Thanks Andi, just what I needed today.

I added the references to the article because it gives the article its validity and shows your therapist and doctor it is not some pratering person going on about the subject. Very useful to have if your care provider is not receptive to your input. They respond to cold hard quantatative facts.


http://www.ldpride.net/emotions.htm
References
American LDA, (1996), They Speak for Themselves- A Survey of Adults with Learning Disabilities (Shoestring Press) Pittsburgh, PA 15234<?XML:NAMESPACE PREFIX = O /><O:P> </O:P>

Baum, S (1985). Learning disabled students with superior cognitive abilities: A validation study of descriptive behavior. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Connecticut, Storrs.<O:P> </O:P>

Brody, L. E. & Mills, C. J. (1997). gifted Children with Learning Disabilities: A review of the issues. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 30(3), 382-296.<O:P> </O:P>

Gerber. P.J., Ginsberg, R., & Reiff, H.B. (1992). Identifying alterable patterns in employment success for highly successful adults with learning disabilities. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 25 (8) 475-487.<O:P> </O:P>

Gerber, P. J. (1998). Trials and tribulations of a teacher with learning disabilities through his first two years of employment. In R. J. Anderson, C. E. Keller, & J. M. Carp (Eds.), Enhancing diversity: educator with disabilities (pp. 41-59). Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Press.<O:P> </O:P>

Gerber, P. J., and Reiff, H., eds. (1994) Learning Disabilities In Adulthood: Persisting Problems And Evolving Issues: Stoneham, MA: Butterworth-Heinemann.<O:P> </O:P>

Jones H. B., (1986). The gifted Dyslexic. Annals of Dyslexia, 36, 301-317

Kirsch, Irwin S., Ann Jungeblut, Lynn Jenkins, et al. (1993) Adult Literacy in America: A First Look at the Results of the National Adult Literacy Survey, (pg. 44) U.S. Department of Education, NCES, Washington, DC.

Michaels, C. A. (1994a) Transition strategies for persons with learning disabilities. San Diego, CA.

NICHCY - National Information Centre for Children and Youth with Disabilities. (2002) General Information about Learning Disabilities. (pg. 1) Fact sheet #7. Retrieved <O:P></O:P>

November 2, 2002, from http://www.ldonline.org/ld_indepth/general_info/nichcy_fs7.pdf (http://www.ldonline.org/ld_indepth/general_info/nichcy_fs7.pdf)

Silver, L. B. (1998) The Misunderstood Child: Understanding and Coping With Your Child's Learning Disabilities 3rd edition, NY: Random House Books.

Walker, K. (2000) Self Regulation and Sensory Processing for Learning, Attention and Attachment . Occupational Therapy Department, University of Florida.

West, T. G. (1997). In the minds eye: visual thinkers, gifted people with dyslexia, and other learning difficulties, computer images, and the ironies of creativity. Amherst, NY: Prometheus Books.<O:P> </O:P>

*~ §EEK ~*
11-15-06, 10:51 PM
Excellent article Andi! :)

meadd823
11-24-06, 03:51 AM
*~ §EEK ~* I am glad I am not the only one late to this article. . . ;)

Thanks Andi. . . I was labeled retarded in the third grade because I couldn't spell or properly pronounce words. . . it was assumed I couldn't read either!

My dyslexia was discovered early but in the late 60's and 70's they didn't have a clue what to do to help me. . . I had some wonderful teachers and a hard headed mother who refused to give up. . .

I can see where many of the symptoms of ADD and LD over lap. . . the most damaging thing in my life was my own self concept of not measuring up. . .I felt like the village idiot. . . thanks to the many wonderful people I met here I no longer feel inferior, incapable or broken. . . I don't hate my own brain like I once did not too long ago!

~Ødd~Scr~θθball
03-07-07, 11:10 AM
If I may step up to the :soapbox: and say:
Hey Andi, A Superb Article like this needs to be bumped up to the front desk section in "Site and Info" a must read. and left there for all to read. It explains eloquently all that many of us go through on a daily basis in the course of living and coping and would also help those who-might not themselves be coping with these issues-but are either living with or dealing with someone who is. For me and I'm sure others on this forum-this article is the beckoning light through the fog and puts into words what we ouselves-ADD{H}D and learning challenged can not explain but feel and know in our hearts and minds to be true. Thanks Andi for posting this. I hope sincerely your 10 Star Thumbs-up Article finds it way on the front page, permanently :D
Bless you :D

:) :cool: :D ;)

jeaniebug
03-07-07, 01:23 PM
Thanks, Odd and Andi! This is a great article. Glad you bumped it up! :D

~boots~
03-08-07, 09:47 PM
Great post Andi..I even managed to read half of it nearly :-)
I'll print it off

odd duck
05-23-07, 10:20 PM
That was very heart wrenching for me to read because I identified with so much of it in my own case as well as when I drove school bus and saw the unthinking behaviors that so many would inflict upon the kids. Teachers, parents, administration, and the public in general as well.

For me the injustices, the empathy, name calling, accusations of lazy and stupid..... The list goes on......

I have a big problem with organizing information and the phyisical act of writing my thoughts on paper, until I learned how to use the computer to organize my thoughts I could count on one hand how many letters I wrote by the age of 35.

I have lost track of where I was going with this so I will just say thanks again for sharing this info.

Keith

skilganon
08-12-08, 12:00 PM
I think you forgot one, test anxiety,going up to do a test and forgetting everything you read the night before,and then having to turn in a test with nothing on it. how humiliating.

skilganon
08-25-08, 01:01 AM
The other day I had to sit down and do a test , survey at my work , it had 100questions on it with multiple choice. The year before they gave us one of these and I did what I always did in school, I was stuck on the first problem when I looked up at the clock 15minutes had passed, and i had not even gotten the first one done yet. So I just colored in the dots real fast and ha nded it in. This year I was on strattera and I had to do it again. Is there any hope for us who have learning disabilitys for higher education, and if so how. the strattera helped for the add but it did not do anything for the learning disability. Is there anything out there that can help a learning disability.

dorian_deficit
09-28-08, 08:41 AM
Andi,

Thanks for sharing this article. Esp. the areas about emotional regularity and sensitivity, and how the other symptoms that LD'S and ADD'ers experience can sometimes manifest in peculiar ways, and furthermore.. encompass themselves in just about EVERY area of a persons life.

For myself who's ADD, that's what I think is most important for.. say, someone who wasn't ADD and was reading that article: just the sole realization that ADD isn't something you simply deal with at school, then pack up, and go home, and everything's ok.

It follows your everywhere...

So, yeah, thanks for sharing this.

strike333
10-02-08, 10:51 PM
how to deal with this Mixed receptive-expressive language disorder? My doctor said to go out in social situations with determination to learn. Is there a better way to do it? medication? techniques? etc..

how does speech therapy help with this condition?

Thanks,

I pray that we all can overcome this problem.

dorian_deficit
10-03-08, 01:01 AM
I am 30 years old and still attend college. I have been called "immature" and "retarded" by people on the internet. I have had to not work while studying and have had people tell me that I should stop wasting the government's money and get a job and stop pursing my art degree. Art was what got me through some of my trials and tribulations. I do not understand how someone can just get behind a keyboard and totally be allowed to tell someone how awful they must feel and not be reprimanded for it. That's why I like this site so much, you guys really do a good job at making this a community.


First n foremost, I admire you for pursuing what inspires you! I'm comorbid Bp/Add too, and I know the neccessity of having that available outlet (often creative) to steer you through the trying times of this kind of dual Dx.

And well.. there's no reprimanding when you type ******* comments about another person behind a computer screen; it's unfortunate but simply just the case-- too much anonymity involved to make some people care enough about what they write.

Next time, remember:

"Immature"-- synonymous in my wordpicnicfiles with "lighthearted," or "one who has effortlessly managed to maintain zeal and sense of youth."

"Retarted"-- anyone who includes this word as part of their vocabulary is clearly an inanimate object themselves.. or should be, anyways.

compart23
02-19-09, 03:33 AM
I think i will copy this and paste it into my facebook page so my freinds can better understand what i've tried to explain but can never put it together right.

dormammau2008
02-21-09, 05:57 PM
thanksss addi for posting this threde very nicely put and lesson for us all to watch and leren toghterrr on the path we walk in life x

dorm

Marspider
03-22-09, 09:12 AM
By the way, I've discovered learning disabilities are defined differently in the UK. In the US, a learning disability is something like dyslexia, in the UK, it's defined more as mentally handicapped as in Down's syndrome so just be careful.

Lunacie
03-22-09, 10:17 AM
I have Attention Deficit Disorder and bi-polar and Identified with a lot of this (except dyslexia. I never have had too much trouble with reading. Is there such a thing as Math dyslexia?)

>>



Yeah, there is. It's called Dyscalculia. I was an accelerated reader - when my older brother would bring home his new school books each fall I would devour them. Wasn't long until I was reading some of my mom's old college books (especially enjoyed Greek myths). But my grades in math were inconsistent. It wasn't until I began bowling in high school that something finally clicked in my head and I could understand how to do math. I still have an awful time with phone numbers or writing down an address and mix the numbers up. I've called sooo many wrong numbers that I just love having a cell phone that automatically dials the phone number for me!

My granddaughter is just like I was when I was her age, and she can't keep track of whose turn it is when playing board games and such. I didn't realize some of these were related to dyscalculia - but I can check off every one of these symptoms.


Normal or accelerated language acquisition: verbal, reading, writing. Poetic ability. Good visual memory for the printed word. Good in the areas of science (until a level requiring higher math skills is reached), geometry (figures with logic not formulas), and creative arts.

Difficulty with the abstract concepts of time and direction. Inability to recall schedules, and the sequences of past or future events. Unable to keep track of time. May be chronically late.

Mistaken recollection of names. Poor name/face retrieval. Substitute names beginning with same letter.

Inconsistent results in addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. Poor mental math ability. Poor with money and credit. Cannot do financial planning or budgeting. Checkbooks not balanced. Short term, not long term financial thinking. Fails to see big financial picture. May have fear of money and cash transactions. May be unable to mentally figure change due back, the amounts to pay for tips, taxes, etc.

When writing, reading and recalling numbers, these common mistakes occur:
number additions, substitutions, transpositions, omissions, and reversals.

Inability to grasp and remember math concepts, rules, formulas, sequence (order of operations), and basic addition, subtraction, multiplication and division facts.

Poor long term memory (retention & retrieval) of concept mastery- may be able to perform math operations one day, but draw a blank the next! May be able to do book work but fails all tests and quizzes.

May be unable to comprehend or "picture" mechanical processes. Lacks "big picture/ whole picture" thinking. Poor ability to "visualize or picture" the location of the numbers on the face of a clock, the geographical locations of states, countries, oceans, streets, etc.

Poor memory for the "layout" of things. Gets lost or disoriented easily. May have a poor sense of direction, may lose things often, and seem absent minded. (Remember the absent minded professor?)

May have difficulty grasping concepts of formal music education. Difficulty sight-reading music, learning fingering to play an instrument, etc.

May have poor athletic coordination, difficulty keeping up with rapidly changing physical directions like in aerobic, dance, and exercise classes. Difficulty remembering dance step sequences, rules for playing sports.

Difficulty keeping score during games, or difficulty remembering how to keep score in games, like bowling, etc. Often loses track of whose turn it is during games, like cards and board games. Limited strategic planning ability for games, like chess.

from: http://www.dyscalculia.org/symptoms.html

dormammau2008
03-22-09, 10:05 PM
By the way, I've discovered learning disabilities are defined differently in the UK. In the US, a learning disability is something like dyslexia, in the UK, it's defined more as mentally handicapped as in Down's syndrome so just be careful.

a mental handcape thats a new one to me???? where dse it say that if i may ask never though id be though an haveing a mental illness

???????????????
dorm
<!-- / message -->

Marspider
03-26-09, 05:41 AM
By the way, I've discovered learning disabilities are defined differently in the UK. In the US, a learning disability is something like dyslexia, in the UK, it's defined more as mentally handicapped as in Down's syndrome so just be careful.

a mental handcape thats a new one to me???? where dse it say that if i may ask never though id be though an haveing a mental illness

???????????????
dorm
<!-- / message -->

I moved to the UK last year. I told someone I had a learning disability and they looked me at oddly. I didn't cotton on till months afterward I read a story about a man with a learning disability who set off a bomb in a restaurant. It said he had a mental age of 10, I remember wondering why having dyslexia or similar would make you have a mental age of 10 cause that's generally for people with normal intelligence (not that people with lower intelligence can't have dyslexia too).
The story http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/crime/article5619151.ece?token=null&offset=0&page=1

Learning disability in the UK
http://www.mencap.org.uk/page.asp?id=1684

Type learning disability on Google US, and you get results like dyslexia etc, on wikipedia, it says learning disability is not indicative of low intelligence etc.

Type learning disability on Google.co.uk and you get stuff like Down's syndrome etc. on the Mencap page, it says learning disability is not mental illness or dyslexia.

Confusing isn't it? And I haven't seen anyone on any websites actually highlighting the UK and US differences of the term. And it's A BIG DIFFERENCE.:confused: Surely I can't be the only one who's noticed.

Logic
09-19-09, 09:18 AM
I'll apologise in advance for being finicky ;)

Myth #6: Adults with learning disabilities cannot succeed in higher education.

Fact: More and more adults with learning disabilities are going to college or university and succeeding (Gerber and Reiff 1994). With the proper accommodations and support, adults with learning disabilities can be successful at higher education.

I know that this is an old thread, but the part of me that likes to correct other people's spelling and grammar just can't let that bit lie... sorry :rolleyes:

Shouldn't it read: Adults with learning disabilities can succeed in higher education?
That way, the fact statement makes sense and isn't a contradiction in terms.

I'm sure everybody read it like that anyway, but I want to do other stuff today, and if I didn't 'bring it up' by posting on it, then I'd never get anything else done, because I'd be thinking about it constantly! :o

Logic

Lunacie
09-19-09, 11:23 AM
I'll apologise in advance for being finicky ;)



I know that this is an old thread, but the part of me that likes to correct other people's spelling and grammar just can't let that bit lie... sorry :rolleyes:

Shouldn't it read: Adults with learning disabilities can succeed in higher education?
That way, the fact statement makes sense and isn't a contradiction in terms.

I'm sure everybody read it like that anyway, but I want to do other stuff today, and if I didn't 'bring it up' by posting on it, then I'd never get anything else done, because I'd be thinking about it constantly! :o

Logic

The fact statement is supposed to contradict the myth statement. Yes?

Kiddder
09-19-09, 11:50 AM
I'll apologise in advance for being finicky ;)



I know that this is an old thread, but the part of me that likes to correct other people's spelling and grammar just can't let that bit lie... sorry :rolleyes:

Shouldn't it read: Adults with learning disabilities can succeed in higher education?
That way, the fact statement makes sense and isn't a contradiction in terms.

I'm sure everybody read it like that anyway, but I want to do other stuff today, and if I didn't 'bring it up' by posting on it, then I'd never get anything else done, because I'd be thinking about it constantly! :o

Logic

The FACT is disputing the MYTH......the false statement that adults with LD cannot succeed. If they agreed there would be no contradiction....nothing to correct in the myth.

Logic
09-19-09, 12:13 PM
I see where you're coming from, I processed the syntax in the text differently (in my head) and decided that it read wrong.

I've gone back and re-read the text to discover a 50/50 discrepancy in how the 'fact' either disputes or supports the 'myth', so yes I was right in my assumption that the majority of people that read it, will read it as it was originally intended - to dispute the 'myth'.

I generaly like my facts to agree with statements, and not dispute them, but that's my personal preference. Like I said in my original post, I apologised in advance for being finicky (knowing that some one somewhere would disagree as we all process information differently). :)

Logic

Infinity
09-20-09, 09:16 PM
Great post Andi..I even managed to read half of it nearly :-)
I'll print it off

LOL!!!! me too.

Im jumping to the end of the line from here.

I have since joinign this forum come to see I have dyslexia. And it was two posters who mentioned it that got me to begin paying attention to my spelling errors and I see I flip letters constantly .
And when I write down telephone numbers I flip the numbers.

I thought I was just not remebering . not so . Im flipping them

I also have to have thigs repeated time and again on the phone. directions names and numbers.

I have not been tested.

And this may be why I have such poor grammer . the only way I have been able to write anything is creatively . where structure is more lenient.


Im trying to find out how to get tested ..
any body know how to get tested, whats involved?

I was not tested for dyslexia whne I took tests for ADHD.

Infinity~

Prusilusken
09-20-09, 11:04 PM
I've been wondering about LDs and me...like a lot of other things.

I can recognize all the feelings in Andi's post, but...I did great in school, at least in general. My math skills and "speed" were nothing to cheer for, but not much below average either. I could read and write pretty well before I started school, and during certain times in my life I pretty much plowed through literature. One or two fiction books a day wasn't rare for me. I just couldn't let them go. Everything else than the book I was "inside" were nuissances, sometimes still are, I still do it.
I now know it's called hyperfocussing and that that ability has "saved my life" every once in a while. Terrible random thing, that...

Still, I'm not really sure that ADD alone could have screwed me up so much all alone.
I just have no idea how to get checked out for LDs and other sidedishes, how they are seperated, and if anything else can be done if I turn out to have some problem areas apart from the ADD. If knowing would give me newfound knowledge that I could use to really chance the circumstances in my life, I'd like to know.
If it's "just another stamp on the butt" for the sake of collector's mania, I don't need it. Actually, there's no place left. I lost some weight over the past year. ;)

I'm done playing "Pick a card, any card" when people ask what's wrong with me, why I'm on disability..."You seem so normal to me!"

Yeah, I clean up pretty nice.
I look alright.
But I feel all wrong.

"...and the drugs don't work, they just make you worse..." (The Verve)
applies to me too...getting my potential LDs assessed and confirmed...is it possible it'll have a lifechanging effect if I find out, or are chances that it'll just be yet another dx for the long list of "gifts" I didn't wish for...?

It's a nice post, Andi, even if I am too tired right now to appreciate that it brought possible assessment for LDs and some other conditions up in my brain again.
I've been burying it a bit. Kind of scared of the: "Now you know...not that it matters one bit, you're still as ****ed as ever" direction things might take.

Does anyone by any chance have a link that explains the differential dx thingy for ADD vs. LDs...how to tell the difference, how to rule out one or the other...?

Infinity
09-21-09, 11:00 AM
sure that ADD alone could have screwed me up so much all alone.
I just have no idea how to get checked out for LDs and other sidedishes, how they are seperated, and if anything else can be done if I turn out to have some problem areas apart from the ADD. If knowing would give me newfound knowledge that I could use to really chance the circumstances in my life, I'd like to know.
;)



Does anyone by any chance have a link that explains the differential dx thingy for ADD vs. LDs...how to tell the difference, how to rule out one or the other...?

I don't know how they rule out adhd from dye slex ea .

I just googled adults and dyslexia and read there is more than just dyslexia . a neuro phychologist does the testing through inteligence tests and sequencing type testing.



i was not tested for dyslexia Im fairly certain .

I remember writing a parody about a woman writing in to about.com asking a question about left and right i wish i had a copy of it i felt pretty ackward doing it . had no clue at that time I may have both adhd and dyslexia . I just was not understood well told I was disocitive on line and was a poor speller .


I remenber using my pointer dog writing in as the woman
asking " why is it that when I hear or see a bird I end up with a ground hog in my muzzel ? "

I googled dyslexia baout.com

and found this..

http://www.moshe-szweizer.com/fun/miscellaneous1.htm

at least I do noy feel so all alone..

let your learning disability show.....:p

LD pride walk ... or is it pride talk...

Infinity

************************************************** ******

His idaes of first-aid stopped short of squirting soda water. -- P.G. Wodehouse


<HR>
Human cardiac catheterization was introduced by Werner Forssman in 1929. Ignoring ihs deptartment chief, anbd tying his assistent to an operating table to prevent ehr interference, hge placed a ureteral catheter into a vein in ihs arm, advanced it tothe right atrium [of his heart], and walked upstairs tothe x-ray deptartment wherre hge took tyhe confirmatory x-ray film. In 1956, Dr. Forssman was awarded tyhe Nobel Prize.


<HR>
I get myu excercise acting as pallbearer to my freinds woh exercise. -- Chauncey Depew


<HR>
I got tyhe bill for myu surgery. Now I nkow whta thsoe doctors were wearing masks for. -- James Boren


<HR>
"I keep seeing spots in front of myu eyes." "Did yuo ever see a doctor?" "No, jsut spots."


<HR>
If a person (a) is poorly, (b) receives treatment intended to mkae him better, and (c) gets better, thne no pwoer of reasoning konwn to medical science can convince him tyhat it may not havebeen tyhe treatment that restored ihs health. -- Sir Peter Medawar, "The Art ofthe Soluble"


<HR>
If I kiss you, tyhat is an psychological interaction. On tyhe otehr hand, if I hit yuo overthe head witha brick, that is also a psychological interaction. The differance is tyhat one is freindly andthe otehr is not so friendly. The crucial point is if yuo cxan tell wihch is which. -- Dolph Sharp, "I'm O.K., You're Not So Hot"


<HR>
If yuo look liuke yuor driver's lisense photo -- see a doctor. If yuo look liuke yuor passport photo -- it's too late fora doctor.


<HR>
It is vrey vulgar to talk liuke a dentist wehn one isn't a dentist. It produces a false impression. -- Oscar Wilde.


<HR>

ADHDKylee
11-14-09, 09:22 PM
Hm.. Interesting. I have a Specific Learning Disability of Mathematics and Social and Perceptual NVLD. That's all very true. I actually have above average verbal intelligence even though I'm "learning disabled" A lot of people think the wrong things about learning disabilities. It doesn't mean you are stupid or have below average intelligence (although in some learning disabilities it can mean that in a specific area), it just means you learn in a different way.

bhweller
01-25-10, 11:36 AM
just remember that Richard Branson and lots other people have had wild success. many successfull people are totally undiagnosed but they adapted. The only shame would be walking around telling people and expecting the average ******* to be nice about it. Accept it yourself, but don't be a martyr or expect good behavior from the average talking monkey that you will meet. Most ADHD people I meet have well above average intelligence, creativity, and emotional sensitivity, and that essentially makes them aliens in most cultures.

cbnj
02-21-10, 05:39 PM
Good points bhweller! Branson is definitely a character...wouldn't mind a trip to Necker Island!

supergirl79
02-21-10, 10:47 PM
[quote=ADHDKylee;806265]Hm.. Interesting. I have a Specific Learning Disability of Mathematics and Social and Perceptual NVLD. That's all very true. I actually have above average verbal intelligence even though I'm "learning disabled" A lot of people think the wrong things about learning disabilities. It doesn't mean you are stupid or have below average intelligence (although in some learning disabilities it can mean thatth

I would love to chat with you sometime. I am for sure that I have some kind of math disability that is keeping me from finishing college. I can ace it all but fail math over and over. I was wondering if there was a way I could get some testing done or help for college?

fracturedstory
05-01-10, 07:04 AM
In school I had a maths LD and a reading LD. I could not even write the way I write these days. My punctuation and comprehension was pretty low. Even in college I couldn't comprehend the large bodies of text I had to study, unless I re-read them again and again.

I still cannot do math above year 6 level. It's not that bad, seeing as I don't have to go to school or college anymore and my friends don't give me grief about it.

Funny how if you can't draw you don't have an art LD and I was an exceptional artist at such a young age. Of course they never graded me on it.

Werl
05-20-10, 11:06 PM
Don't have the attention span or the will to read all of the posts, another part is that we dyslexics have and abnormally high or low pain threshold.

aixelsyD out.

AmberMommyof2girls
06-06-10, 11:50 PM
Wish I could have taken this to school with me many years ago.

I agree. This for me was always hard to explain to people. Friends just didn't understand how i could be in AP classes for some subjects and be so far behind in other subjects. I have ADHD and a processing disorder. This would have made my life so much easier to just hand to them and say here read this.
Amber

Appel
08-09-10, 04:29 PM
For what it's worth, I can certainly read just fine and retain some of the subject, not as much as often required. I find discussing the subject matter, or doing hands-on experiments is how I really learn, then the subject is just plain more interesting and engaging more parts of your brain.

-Appel

AlexaN
11-05-10, 11:22 PM
Myth #2

Learning disabilities are just an excuse for irresponsible, unmotivated or lazy people.

Fact

Learning disabilities are caused by neurological impairments not character flaws. In fact, the National Information Centre for Adults and Youth with Disabilities makes a point of saying that people with learning disabilities are not lazy or unmotivated (NICHCY , 2002).

Gosh, this is how i spent high school:
"You are lazy! You are not trying hard enough".
"You can but you're too lazy to sit and learn for hours!"

I had problems with Math.
I was just not getting it!
It was like chinese for me.

and I am a daughter of a Ph.D Math Professor...

CrazyAndStrange
11-06-10, 05:39 AM
Hello

I know this myths quite good because of my own experiences....
Often I thought about myself that I might be lazy because often it feels like lazyness.
But it is more a kind of helplessness and being stuck in my own world with a few intense interests.And I often can`t stop it so easily.

I also got problems with maths when I was a teenager,I had a chaotic lifestyle, always forgetting my things and being inattentive when it was too much boring theory.

When I was in primary school I hadn`t got many problems because I was a good pupil, but teachers often said that I am very chaotic and hyperactive and once my teacher tipped out my schoolbag...

zannie
12-13-10, 11:26 AM
Don't have the attention span or the will to read all of the posts, another part is that we dyslexics have and abnormally high or low pain threshold.

aixelsyD out.
That is very interesting. Where could i find more info about that.

zannie
12-13-10, 11:34 AM
In school I had a maths LD and a reading LD. I could not even write the way I write these days. My punctuation and comprehension was pretty low. Even in college I couldn't comprehend the large bodies of text I had to study, unless I re-read them again and again.

I still cannot do math above year 6 level. It's not that bad, seeing as I don't have to go to school or college anymore and my friends don't give me grief about it.


Funny how if you can't draw you don't have an art LD and I was an exceptional artist at such a young age. Of course they never graded me on it.


That is an excellent point!!!

I have met a few people with LD that are fantastic artists although I am not one of them. :(

mimi'sdreaming
12-29-10, 05:07 PM
Hm.. Interesting. I have a Specific Learning Disability of Mathematics and Social and Perceptual NVLD. That's all very true. I actually have above average verbal intelligence even though I'm "learning disabled" A lot of people think the wrong things about learning disabilities. It doesn't mean you are stupid or have below average intelligence (although in some learning disabilities it can mean that in a specific area), it just means you learn in a different way.

I've always been told that to have an actual learning disability, you have to have average to above average intelligence (on an IQ test).

You are so right that many people think the wrong thing about learning disabilities. I just had this conversation with a friend whose very bright son most likely has dysgraphia, but she just can't grasp it.

Update: I just read the full orignal post and saw that it is a fact!

Derek_
01-02-11, 07:55 AM
If it wasnt for the fact that the public school system had me in LD classes part time, mind you I was yanked out of my regular classes "TIME FOR LD" and I asked "what does LD mean"? and the fellow student replied "Learning Disabled"

Reading this post has just made me realize how perhaps I'm more emotionally scarred than before and now being just reminded of the mental torment I lived through growing up has just brought this "hard ***" adult to tears.

Its a VERY lonely feeling to where even others whom may be Bi Polar or Manic Depressive fail to understand.

I'm only 29yrs old and the thought of being alive for another several decades scares me knowing that this torment is going to be with me as everyone tries to convince me how ******* funny my torment is to them.

aystro
07-25-11, 05:21 PM
since this is the only thread on LD here I expected some tips on management or the 'subtypes" ( if that exists? ). This is a fairly useful Q& A though.

deannalynne
08-19-11, 01:20 AM
"I've always been told that to have an actual learning disability, you have to have average to above average intelligence (on an IQ test)."

When I was diagnosed with ADD, I also explained to my doctor how frustrating it is for me that I can excel at every subject except math (and math-related sciences) and he said that was a good indication that I have a learning disability.

"since this is the only thread on LD here I expected some tips on management or the 'subtypes" ( if that exists? )."

Dyslexia (confusing words and letters) is most common, but there are others such as the math one. Apparently, there are different types of the math one as well (too lazy to look up the spelling). Some are bad at chronology, others sequencing, and others at spatial reasoning. And then there is math anxiety and test anxiety, but I am not sure if those are LD's or something else. :)

Celeste
04-23-12, 09:56 AM
Since there's only one thread about this I figured I'd post it here. Hope that's all right. :)

I'd never considered that I might have a learning disability, but I've always had problems studying for school and reading books, so I did a search on Google to see if there were any tools that could help me read. And I found the Eye Level Reading Ruler that is supposed to help people with ADHD, dyslexia and the Irlen Syndrome.

I'd never heard of Irlen so I looked it up and recognised its symptoms. So then I found this page and some of the examples on that page are exactly what I see when I read: http://irlen.com/distortioneffects.php

Later, I read about the symptoms of dyslexia. I didn't think I had it because I don't have any trouble with spelling. And that's when I read about the different types of dyslexia. I've always had problems with maths, but my family didn't think I could have dyscalculia. Anyway, I read about how you can have trouble reading when you have dyslexia (and that not all people with dyslexia mix up letters, etc) and that's when I realised I might have it. I also have trouble writing my thoughts down on paper and describing what I mean (not sure if this could be a symptom of dyslexia?).

But my question is: if you have dyslexia, how do you know what problems are caused by your ADHD and what problems are caused by the dyslexia?

Are the examples shown on that Irlen page part of dyslexia, or could they be ADHD symptoms as well?

Lillianmay
04-24-12, 01:53 AM
To pull up threads on the LD site, go down the page to the part marked “Display Options”. Change the box that says “From the” to a setting that shows a longer time – you get to pick from the options. For example, set it to “Last 75 Days” and then hit “Show Threads” and several threads will appear.

You can also hit “New Thread” to start a new thread.

To try to answer your question – it sort of depends. Different countries use different criteria. In the US dyslexia is called “Reading Disorder” and from what I can tell on my own report, it is specific to the reading, spelling and comprehension problems and also the visual distortion like on the website you gave. I am pretty sure visual distortions are not part of ADHD.

My disorganization, poor working memory poor auditory memory, time blindness are more attributed to my ADHD-PI. But, I have seen dyslexia web sites out of the UK which put the disorganization, time problems, and memory problems as part of dyslexia.

Comprehension problems and getting thoughts down can be either due to ADHD or dyslexia.

I saw the BBC documentary “Kara Tointon: Don’t Call Me Stupid” (it is on YouTube) and my problems were so much like Kara’s that I had an educational evaluation done. That diagnosed the dyslexia but they also picked up on some possible attention problems and I have a diagnosis of reading disorder (dyslexia) and ADHD-PI.

Enigma2712
06-10-12, 02:49 PM
Thats me in a hand basket.

johngalt
09-09-12, 03:57 AM
Yes Andi good article ,thanks for sharing it?

Gadfly
09-16-12, 04:28 PM
Good post and thanks; it made me weep reading it because I identified so much with it.

emmaclair94
11-30-12, 12:38 PM
i'm glad you touched on the whole "learning disabilities only affect children" thing. i have dyscalculia that i got tested for as an adult. i've always had an issue with maths but it wasn't something the teachers at my school picked up on ever, even though i never got above a 40% in a maths exam (and never will) and it took getting a 3% in the exam for my compulsory stats class at uni before i actually had something to work with.

dresser
12-17-12, 10:55 AM
come out from behind the curtain Andy and recive a well deserved curtain call's. knowledge like this is a key to unlock some shackles that have crippled me all life I feel better about me just reading it will go back and high light some points thank you

lalapin
02-17-13, 04:07 PM
Yeah, there is. It's called Dyscalculia.
from: http://www.dyscalculia.org/symptoms.html

I can relate to all of it. I was somehow able to get through most of my math classes with barely passing grades with lots of hard work, lots of tutoring.

But I remember crying with arithmetic stuff back in elementary school. Even in a marketing class where we had to use numbers I passed, I was able to apply formulas etc but I had a hard time when it came to isolating variables, I never knew when to divide, multiply etc so I lost points in solving equations. I don't picture anything in my mind while using numbers, I always tried to learn by heart when to use divisions etc, I'm not using logic when I calculate things. I really cannot do mental arithmetic, calculating tips at the restaurant I feel ashamed when I'm with friends and I try to hide the fact i'm trying to calculate it with my phone. I sometimes am late from my breaks at work if I take my 15 min break at let's say 11:03 instead of 11:00. If I go at 11, I know by heart I have to be back at 11:15, but if I go at 11:03 I might miscalculate and think it's 11:19 instead of 11:18, if I don't take the time to really think.

I find the IQ exercises about shape sequences and number sequences painful and exasperating.

If I know I won't have anymore math classes ever, is it worth it to look into diagnosis or I just can assume I have this disorder, since there are no treatments for it? Like, once you know you have dyscalculia, what can you do about it?

I'm pretty sure it's not problems caused by my ADHD because even on optimal dosage I still find mental arithmetics super hard... should I get tested or should I just not care?

Lunacie
02-17-13, 04:46 PM
I generally passed math classes (sometimes barely passing), but I ran into
a major wall when I had to learn algebra as a freshman. I could not do it.
I've always transcribed numbers, whether I'm writing them down or dialing
them on a phone.

I didn't know I likely have discalculia until I was in my late 50's. I don't see
much point in my trying to change things now. If you're younger than me,
there are things that may be helpful.

Software has been developed to help with this issue.
Neuro-sensory educational therapy has been effective treatment for some.
Transcranial direct current stimulation (TDCS) to the parietal lobe during
numerical learning has shown improvement.

finallyfound10
03-09-13, 04:36 PM
This article really spoke to me!! WOW! Thanks for posting!!!

Wedgie
06-13-13, 06:44 AM
OMG.. I feel as if I have read my whole life story within 5 minutes... I relate to every single word. I do hope that a cure is found for this awful and debilitating syndrome! And for a very long long time I honestly thought I was the only one! This awful syndrome has stolen too many years from my me that I will never get back!

Thank you for a great article!!

jonhale
06-25-13, 09:40 PM
Thank you so much for sharing this Andi, I was tearing up reading it. I can relate so much with it because one of my best friends was diagnosed with it and I witnessed how very frustrating it can be.

- J.H.

Delboy31
07-08-13, 01:50 PM
I found this today and I think it truly helps many of us understand and appreciate what the LD student/adult goes through emotionally. It's something that many of us need to remember from time to time...WE are not alone!!! Looking through the list I believe all of us can identify with many points in our own disorders. As forum members we need to remember this when addressing/communicating with others.





1. Shame

People growing up with a learning disability often feel a sense of shame. For some, it is a great relief to receive the diagnosis while for others the label only serves to further stigmatize them. For many adults, especially older adults, an accurate diagnosis was unavailable. These individuals were frequently labeled as mentally retarded, written off as being unable to learn, and most passed through the school system without acquiring basic academic skills.

Sadly, these feelings of shame often cause the individual to hide their difficulties. Rather than risk being labeled as stupid or accused of being lazy, some adults deny their learning disability as a defense mechanism. Internalized negative labels of stupidity and incompetence usually result in a poor self concept and lack of confidence (Gerber, Ginsberg, & Reiff, 1992)

Some adults feel ashamed of the type of difficulties they are struggling to cope with such as basic literacy skills, slow processing, attention difficulties, chronic forgetfulness, organizational difficulties, etc.

The following myths about learning disabilities have perpetuated the general public’s negative perception about learning disabilities:

Myth #1

People with learning disabilities have below average intelligence and cannot learn.

Fact

People with learning disabilities have average to above average intelligence (Gerber. 1998). In fact, studies indicate that as many as 33% of students with LD are gifted (Baum, 1985; Brody & Mills, 1997; Jones, 1986). With proper recognition, intervention and lots of hard work, children and adults with learning disabilities can learn and succeed!

Myth #2

Learning disabilities are just an excuse for irresponsible, unmotivated or lazy people.

Fact

Learning disabilities are caused by neurological impairments not character flaws. In fact, the National Information Centre for Adults and Youth with Disabilities makes a point of saying that people with learning disabilities are not lazy or unmotivated (NICHCY , 2002).

Myth #3

Learning disabilities only affect children. Adults grow out of learning disabilities.

Fact

It is now known that LD continues throughout the individual’s lifespan and “may even intensify in adulthood as tasks and environmental demands change” (Michaels, 1994a). Sadly, many adults, especially older adults, have never been formally diagnosed with a learning disability. In fact, the majority of people with learning disabilities are not diagnosed until they reach adulthood (LDA, 1996)

Myth #4

Dyslexia and learning disability are the same thing.

Fact

Dyslexia is a type of learning disability. It is not a another term for learning disability. It is a specific language based disorder affecting a person’s ability to read, write and verbally express themselves. Unfortunately, careless use of the term has expanded it so that it has become, for some, an equivalent for "learning disability".

Myth #5

Learning disabilities are only academic in nature. They do not affect other areas of a person’s life.

Fact

Some people with learning disabilities have isolated difficulties in reading, writing or mathematics. However, most people with learning disabilities have more than one area of difficulty. Dr. Larry Silver asserts that "learning disabilities are life disabilities". He writes, “The same disabilities that interfere with reading, writing, and arithmetic also will interfere with sports and other activities, family life, and getting along with friends." (Silver, 1998)

Typically, students with LD have other major difficulties in one or more of the following areas:

* motor coordination
* time management
* attention
* organizational skills
* processing speed


* Social skills needed to make friends and maintaining relationships
* emotional maturation
* verbal expression
* memory



Many adults with learning disabilities have difficulty in performing basic everyday living tasks such as shopping, budgeting, filling out a job application form or reading a recipe. They may also have difficulty with making friends and maintaining relationships. Vocational and job demands create additional challenges for young people with learning disabilities.

Myth #6

Adults with learning disabilities cannot succeed in higher education.

Fact

More and more adults with learning disabilities are going to college or university and succeeding (Gerber and Reiff 1994). With the proper accommodations and support, adults with learning disabilities can be successful at higher education.

2. Fear

Another emotional difficulty for adults with learning disabilities is fear. This emotion is often masked by anger or anxiety. Tapping into the fear behind the anger and/or the anxiety response is often the key for adults to cope with the emotional fallout of learning disabilities.

Feelings of fear may be related one or more of the following issues:

* fear of being found out
* fear of failure
* fear of judgment or criticism
* fear of rejection

Fear of Being Found Out

Many adults with learning disabilities live with fear of being found out. They develop coping strategies to hide their disability. For example, an adult who can hardly read might pretend to read a newspaper. Other adults may develop gregarious personalities to hide their difficulties or focus on other abilities that do not present learning barriers. Unfortunately some adults will have developed negative strategies such as quitting their job rather than risking the humiliation of being terminated because their learning disability makes it difficult for them to keep up with work demands.

The fear of being found out is particularly troublesome for many older adults who have never been diagnosed with a learning disability or those who received inappropriate support. Such adults were frequently misdiagnosed with mental retardation, inappropriately placed in programs for the mentally disabled, and/or stigmatized by teachers and classmates. In later life, these adults often return to learning through adult literacy programs in order make up for lost educational opportunities. Seeking help is a difficult step forward for these adults because it requires them to stop hiding their disability. The simple act of entering a classroom can be an anxiety producing experience for adults who have been wrongly labeled and/or mistreated by the educational system. For these adults, returning to a learning environment is truly an act of courage!

Low literacy skills and academic difficulties are not the only type of learning disabilities adults try to hide. Adults with social skill difficulties may live in constant fear of revealing social inadequacies. For example, an adult who has trouble understanding humour, may pretend to laugh at a joke even through they don’t understand it. They may also hide their social difficulties by appearing to be shy and withdrawn. On the other hand, hyperactive adults may cover up their attention difficulties by using a gregarious personality to entertain people.

Fear of Failure

The National Adult Literacy Survey, 1992, found that 58% of adult with self-reported learning disabilities lacked the basic functional reading and writing skills needed to experience job and academic success (Kirsch, 1993). Most of these adults have not graduated high school due to the failure of the school system to recognize and/or accommodate their learning disability. Needless to say, adult literacy programs are a second chance to learn the basic academic skills missed out in public school. As mentioned above, going back into an educational environment is often a fearful experience for adults with learning disabilities. One of the main reasons for this is the fear of failure. Many adults reason that, if they have failed before, what is to stop them failing again and, if they do fail again, then this failure must mean they, themselves, are failures.. The tendency for adults with learning disabilities to personalize failure (i.e. failure makes ME a failure) is perhaps the biggest self-esteem buster for adult learners. Educators need to be aware of these fears to help learner’s understand that failure does not make them a failure and making mistakes is a part of the learning process.

For most people, anxiety about failing is what motivates them to succeed, but for people with learning disabilities this anxiety can be paralyzing. Fear of failure may prevent adults with learning disabilities from taking on new learning opportunities. It might prevent them from participating in social activities, taking on a new job opportunity or enrolling in an adult education course.

One positive characteristic that often helps adults overcome their fear of failure is their ability to come up with innovative strategies to learn and solve problems. These strategies are often attributed to the “learned creativity” that many adults with learning disabilities develop in order to cope with the vocational , social and educational demands in their everyday lives. (Gerber, Ginsberg,& Reiff, 1992).

Fear of Ridicule

Adults with learning disabilities frequently fear the ridicule of others. Sadly, these fears often develop after the individual has been routinely ridiculed by teachers, classmates or even family members. The most crushing of these criticisms usually relates to a perceived lack of intelligence or unfair judgments about the person’s degree of motivation or ability to succeed. For example, comments such as “you’ll never amount to anything”, “you could do it if you only tried harder”, or the taunting of classmates about being “in the mental retard class” have enormous emotional effects on individuals with learning disabilities. For many of these adults, especially those with unidentified learning disabilities, these and other negative criticisms, continue to affect their emotional well-being into their adult years. It is not uncommon for adults to internalize the negative criticisms and view themselves as dumb, stupid, lazy, and/or incompetent. Such negative criticisms often fuel the fear adults with learning disabilities have about being found out.

Fear of Rejection

Adults with learning disabilities frequently fear rejection if they are not seen to be as capable as others. If they come from a middle to upper class family where academic achievement is a basic expectation for its members, fear of rejection may be a very real concern. They may also fear that their social skill deficits will preclude them from building meaningful relationships with others and may lead to social rejection. Prior experiences of rejection will likely intensify this sense of fear.

3. Environmental and Emotional Sensitivity

Environmental Sensitivities

Adults are often overwhelmed by too much environmental stimuli (e.g. background noise, more than one person talking at a time, side conversations, reading and listening at the same time). Many people with LD and ADD have specific sensitivities to their environment such as certain fabrics they cannot wear, foods they cannot tolerate, etc.

Emotional Sensitivity

Many adults with learning disabilities see themselves as more emotionally sensitive than other people In its most extreme form, high levels of emotional sensitivity are both a blessing and a weakness. The positive features of this trait helps adults with learning disabilities build meaningful relationships with others. For example, they are often very intuitive and in-tune with both their own and other people's emotions. Sometimes they are actually able to perceive other's thoughts and feelings. However, this strength also serves as weakness due to its propensity to overwhelm the individuals. Emotional difficulties occur when they are unable to cope with the onslaught of emotions they are feeling. Highly sensitive adults with LD may be moved to tears more easily or feel their own and other people’s pain more deeply. For example, Thomas West, writer of "The Minds Eye", not only gives a thorough explanation of Winston Churchill's learning disability, but also describes his sensitive nature. West details Churchill's tendency to break into tears quite easily" (West, 1997) even out in the public eye. He notes one incident in which Churchill was moved to tears after witnessing the devastating effects of a bomb.

This description of Churchill also serves to highlight the strong sense of justice that many adults with learning disabilities possess. Unfortunately, this sense of justice often serves as a double edged sword. On one hand, it is refreshing to behold the passion of many of these individuals in their fight to overcome injustice. While on the other hand, this very passion, when it crosses the line into aggression, can cause social rejection and/or emotional overload. Often the individual may be unaware that their behavior has turned aggressive. They only wish make their point known and have others understand it. This type of over reaction is not a purposeful attempt to hurt anybody. It is more likely to be caused by a difficulty with monitoring their emotions and consequent behavior.

4. Emotional Regulation

Difficulties with regulating emotions are common for highly sensitive adults with learning disabilities. Dr. Kay Walker, describes the connection between learning disabilities and self-regulation problems in her paper “Self Regulation and Sensory Processing for Learning, Attention and Attachment”. She asserts that self-regulation problems frequently occur in those with learning disabilities (Walker, 2000) In its most extreme form, individual may easily shift from one emotion to the next. Others may experience difficulty regulating impulsive thoughts or actions.

Fortunately, most adults have learned to handle their emotional sensitivity to avoid becoming overwhelmed or engaging in negative social interactions. Nevertheless, some adults may be so deeply affected that they become depressed or suffer from anxiety. A lack of school, job and/or social success will likely add to this emotional burden. Some adults with LD, especially those who have been ridiculed by their family members, teachers and/or peers, may be more apt to take criticism to heart because of their experiences and/or their ultra-sensitive nature. Emotional wounds from childhood and youth may cause heightened emotional responses to rejection. In turn, social anxiety and social phobia may result

5. Difficulty Adjusting to Change

Change is scary for everyone, but for people with learning disabilities and other neurological disabilities, change may be particularly difficult. Children with learning disabilities may prefer procedures to stay the same and have a hard time moving from one activity to another. Usually this difficulty becomes less of an issue as the child matures. However, adults with learning disabilities may still experience difficulty adjusting to change in more subtle ways . For example, some adults will have trouble moving from one work task to another without completely finishing the first task before moving on to the next one. Adults with learning disabilities are frequently described as inflexible when it comes to considering another person’s view point or a different way of doing something.

Adjustment to change is difficult for adults with LD because change brings the unexpected. In general, people with learning disabilities are less prepared for the unexpected. The unexpected may bring new learning hurdles, new job demands or new social challenges. Since all these areas can be affected by learning disabilities, it is no wonder why change can produce so much anxiety for adults with learning disabilities.

To avoid the tendency to blame the person for their lack of flexibility, it is important to understand the neurological basis for this difficulty with adjusting to change. With this said, through social skills practice, adults with learning disabilities can improve their ability to tolerate change. In addition, parents, instructors, and other professionals can help adults with learning disabilities by making transition processes easier through understanding and accommodating the adults’ needs.



http://www.ldpride.net/emotions.htm

:goodpost:


If I may, you can also have what I call "verbal dyslexia", which my Dr. told me is very real...I can't remember the technical term for it, but I know that it is so pervasive when under stress ex. work, and the knowledge of what I may say wrong makes it even worse. I sound like I'm clueless, when in actuality, I am well informed.

Diony
12-29-13, 10:23 PM
Thanks for posting this!
I was diagnosed with a learning disability but im not sure if thats all i have because it really has paralyzed me in a way, my life has been at a stand still since i graduated high school, which i wasnt even supposed to graduate. I was diagnosed it a year or so ago so i, not sure if thats the whole problem.

4ever4
01-05-14, 04:23 AM
So grateful to read this. Kudos to Andi....Important info for teachers and parents!

This brought tears to my eyes. Many decades too late for me now...but would like to send it to my siblings, parents and former teachers. Sadly...bullying starts at home.

Sincerely; 4ever4

Thelema93
07-26-14, 04:40 PM
Thank you for that post it was like taking the trip down memory lane, it's such a two-edged sword for me when I read that information, because you don't want to admit it you want to forget it, but every time you turn around there is! I thought it was absolutely amazing that at the age of 53 I found out why I can't do math because of dyslexia! Someone finally took the time to sit down with me and she was a professional and she immediately recognized it. And it's amazing how it does intensify and get worse with age.

Aloha:confused:

add_me
08-01-14, 11:48 AM
My new pet peeve is not being able to quickly read the twitter comments on the bottom of the TV screen, during a show. I'll read halfway through a sentence, and the blurb has already disappeared from the screen. Also while trying to read the twitter comments, I get anxiety knowing I'm not reading at a quick enough speed. Has any one else had this happen to them?

Dysexlia
09-15-14, 08:09 PM
Wow, Andi thank you for posting this.

I'm diagnosed ADD with a mild LD (visual-spatial). This whole article resonates with me so much. I wish someone could have told me all of these things when I was diagnosed in 5th grade.

ADD-Man
11-05-14, 02:48 AM
Thank you for posting this. It came to me just at the right time.

ngnassar
05-26-17, 07:34 AM
Thank you, very interesting article. What percent of people with ADHD have learning disabilities and how is it impeding their studies and professional life? Is there any methods to help them improve their focus on reading/listening?