View Full Version : Teaching REading Methods that work:


fuzzybrain
05-03-06, 11:08 AM
I just found out a very interesting method of teaching Reading to kids who are global learners-not analytical-so phonics doesn't work too well with them-it is called Language Experience, has anyone used it or heard of it? It is where you read to them a small story-cut up the words, clip them together in sentences and they learn the words one at a time until they connect them to each other in the sentence, and then eventually they learn the sentences together, and they are reading the story, just curious if anyone knew anything about how this ACTUALLY works for slower learners. thanks Lori

Ian
05-03-06, 12:06 PM
We can hardly have too many tools at our disposal to help kids learn to read. Thanks for the ideas. I hope you'll keep us up to date on any observations you have about this method along your travels.

I speak here as a parent with the luxury of bombarding my kids with stories to capture their imagination. My youngest found reading tough, but eventually could not wait until I was free to read to her and began to slog through sentence after sentence squeezing out meaning in my absence. Now it's a slam dunk and she's off to the races, reading up a storm. Confidence is so important.

The method I love most is to grow a hunger in them that can't be stopped. Reading aloud is good. I wonder how many kids on the fringes got hooked into reading through the Harry Potter series.

There are so many good books. Once the fire is lit the child usually will lead the way to which method is reaping the best benefits.
Ian

chloe516
05-03-06, 12:41 PM
Sounds like whole language to me, but I haven't heard of it. I will look into it!

ADDitives
05-04-06, 05:43 AM
you need a balance between whole language and phonics, it's all good though. anything you do helps.

fuzzybrain
05-04-06, 09:33 AM
Thanks,
You know with all the different kinds of intelligences, you hope to spark something in someone. With me, I learned to read by Dr. Seuss, just reading and rhyming, and it was really fun when they came through the mail. So I think it is tapping into what works, I am just scouting to see what is out there-Actually-I got it wrong, as I do in my hurry sometimes-You have THEM tell you a story and you write it down- word for word, even if it uses wrong sentence structure or whatever-then you cut them up, mix it up-I think you turn them upside down, and as they get the words, you add them to the sentence. Some teacher said she makes them each a file with words they know and can be added to as you go. Just some cool ideas. thanks again. L.

dormammau2008
05-04-06, 09:55 AM
different kinds of intelligences tell me more fuzzzy id love to know more dorm

fuzzybrain
05-04-06, 01:41 PM
Actually dorm, another post-I will do Yoda I am not. Lori

ADDitives
11-07-06, 08:24 AM
actually a 'language experience' can be many things not just that - one way i've heard of it is that you write a story as a whole class and then use it as reading material

buffalopc7
11-07-06, 10:53 AM
I just found out a very interesting method of teaching Reading to kids who are global learners-not analytical-so phonics doesn't work too well with them-it is called Language Experience, has anyone used it or heard of it? It is where you read to them a small story-cut up the words, clip them together in sentences and they learn the words one at a time until they connect them to each other in the sentence, and then eventually they learn the sentences together, and they are reading the story, just curious if anyone knew anything about how this ACTUALLY works for slower learners. thanks Lori
The concept makes sense, although I don't know if it would have been effective for me as a child, maybe so. As far as my ability to retain via reading, its always been darn near impossible, unless i'm hyperfocused on something or I divide it into small areas to digest, kinda like what Language Experience seems to do. In all honesty, i've never read a nonfiction book or story in my life. I can't create that visual to go with what i'm reading, and I believe that ability is the mind's way of creating something that enables one to retain unfamiliar material. Now, when you take a work of nonfiction and make it into a movie, it ALL goes in, effortlessley. Visual learner, to be sure, but it would be nice to sit and read a story and "see" it. Wonder if that can be taught.

ADDitives
11-08-06, 01:24 AM
To add to this, I have to say that all children do need a strong phonics background to reading (but it's not the only thing you use). From my experiences teaching, and the two children I tutor, children need strategies to decode (read) unfamiliar words - having a bank of 'sight words' is not enough ... but both are essential. I think part of the problem is that in the early years of school (e.g. K - 3) children are only taught phonics, and not taught to get meaning out of it - or are given boring things to read. As someone said - use interesting books to get a love of reading. As the years go on, children should definately be exposed to a more meaning based method of reading, but still, need integration of phonics and sound-symbol recognition.

Another idea is to 'integrate' the different areas of English - use reading, writing, listening, speaking, and viewing (if viewing is part of your curriculum) together... I would rarely have a pure 'reading' lesson for an hour in the upper grades (year/ grade 5 and above), though some things do lend themselves to it. Have you heard of the literacy hour? The idea is that every child will be involved in literacy experiences for one hour every day - it can be upto an hour and a half. Different schools and programs run it different ways, but the general idea is to have writing (including spelling and grammar) reading, listening and speaking, and viewing all covered (not necessarily in every lesson!!) - and this can be done by small group rotations if you want, using independent and teaccher-directed activities. Take advantage of parent helpers and student-teachers for this too!

Yet another idea is to integrate English into other areas of the curriculum such as science or society and environment - moreso, you're integrating science or s/e into english... as you use your topic materials as reading materials (of course not every lesson....), and also teach reading skills in those other subject areas, and take spelling words from topic words in science and s/e.

I think you need a structured program underneath, but you just have to throw everything at them, and teach the same thing in 100 different ways twice, and hope that they will get something from it!

As someone once said, if you run them through the mud enough times, some of it will stick.

Has anyone heard of THE FOUR ROLES OF THE READER, which is also called the Four Resources Model, and has been extended into writing aswell?

I'll get some info on that for later - it's relevant to what i've said, and to what everyone is saying.

dormammau2008
11-10-06, 09:48 PM
phonics with letters work best for me an a good techer who must be femlame for resons i wont go into.....be good to do a poll to see what meds here that we use to leren with form others to comper dorm