View Full Version : Therapy/Hynotherapy


Bangedup
05-21-06, 02:00 PM
Hey, I was wondering if any of you guys have had therapy sessions or even hypnotherapy sessions and if they were helpful at all.

As of right now I'm not taking any meds and I would love to keep it that way, but I've been considering therapy for quite some time.

Oh, and how do I go about getting these sessions; do I just approach my doctor and get a referral or is there some other way?

Thanks, in advance, any help will be wonderful.

ChaoticOrder
05-21-06, 03:32 PM
Hey Banged Up!

I was actually diagnosed through therapy sessions with my psychologist. I see him bi-weekly and it is nice to get full hour seesions. Although hour long sessions on a one-to-one basis were a bit overwhleming at first (escape!), it actually did an awful lot in helping me to understand myself.

I learned from an early age that I tend to ramble and try to take ownership of conversations, and I usually said dumb/immature things that I would get riducled about. Therefore, I learned to not speak very much and keep my thoughts bottled up inside. My psychologist finally got me talking again. Now, once again, I tend to control the conversation with my psychologist for the full hour. But at least I am getting it off my chest, and when I do give him a chance to speak, he gives me a lot of insight to my problems. He was the one that first diagnosed me.

Now the hours fly by, and I wish I had more opportunities and time to undergo therapy and talk about my situation. I, too, would like feed back from others on other methods of therapy (but for some reason I don't think I'd be able to talk myself into hypnotherapy... I'm probably just scared of not being in control).

Please, if anyone has any other ideas or successfully therapy (with or without meds... I just started Adderall), I would also like to here what alternatives there are. Any experiences, successful or not, I think would be beneficial to both of us.

I hope someone can give you some good ideas, insights or experiences.

ChaoticOrder

Bangedup
05-21-06, 04:02 PM
Thanks Chaotic... I totally agree with you about hypnotherapy but an aquaintance of mine was able to stop smoking because of it, and totally endorses it. So I checked out some sites and many claim they can help with ADHD, depression, anxiety, etc. I'm still very skeptical and intimidated (you know the whole control issue), but it's opened my mind up a little bit to other possibilities. But you know how the saying goes, "If something sounds to good to be true..."

ChaoticOrder
05-21-06, 04:41 PM
Thanks Chaotic... I totally agree with you about hypnotherapy but an aquaintance of mine was able to stop smoking because of it, and totally endorses it. So I checked out some sites and many claim they can help with ADHD, depression, anxiety, etc. I'm still very skeptical and intimidated (you know the whole control issue), but it's opened my mind up a little bit to other possibilities. But you know how the saying goes, "If something sounds to good to be true..."
Yeah, I wouldn't even care if the hypnotherapy had a placebo effect on me. I am a big fan of placebo effects (the brain can react and release checmicals if you/it thinks you should be experiencing some sort of effect... kinda weird). The only thing I don't like about placebo effects is that they usually diminish after the additional "expectations". But I think hypnotherapy may offer a lot more to me than a placebo effect. It may have therapeutic effects and also may have some overlap with meditiation effects.

Have you ever researched medititation possibilities? I have been thinking about it for a while. It may be hard for use to feel the "calm" state I usually associate with meditiation, but maybe it would help us "train our brain" eventually. I just wouldn't know where to start with that one... I don't like group classes, so it would have to be a DYI effort or one coordinated/monitered by my psychologist.

Anyone else?

Bob1951
05-22-06, 06:51 AM
My experience is "brain training" is a big part of learning to live with ADHD.

How to train one's brain?

Fact: Habits (both good and bad) are the result of brain training. Scientists think that our brains physically change as we learn. Practice and repetition tend to burn things in.

It is a real catch22 thing with ADHD. Focus, concentration, "shooting for a singular bullseye" are the tools of practice. Wouldn't you know it?

I have been doing a type of mediation recommended by sport's psychologists I learned some years ago, that is, to visualize myself performing acceptably. I write down the goal in a notepad and then visualize all the steps I need to take to reach it.

I've made good progress controlling procrastination with visualization. I need to see the path from get-go to task completion to even get started.

I apply this to work by writing out in a notepad what I intend to do, how I intend to do it, and how it relates to completed sections of a project in progress. I do it every work morning and my productivity has skyrocketed.

I must say that I was not able to implement this "visualization mediation" without Adderall but the learned skill seems to be holding up without the drug.

At any rate, I can say with confidence that "brain training" of one form or another is essentially on getting a handle on ADHD.

Bob

Ren Höek
05-03-07, 07:51 AM
Does any kind of brain training work? Or do I specifically need to do a training focussed on my 'features' that need updating?

zmarie
01-03-08, 12:36 PM
Hypnotherapists... My second therapist was a psychodynamic therapist and a hypnotherapist. The hypnotherapy he tried to practise on me consisted of him getting me to relax, rather deeply, by counting down and all that, and then immediately getting me to tense up worse than ever by trying to make me visualize nature scenarios and stuff (I'm not good at visualizing) and asking me annoying symbolic questions (who do you see coming towards you on the meadow? Is it your mother?). Then we'd argue about if I was tense because I didn't want to deal with my issues or because I didn't really find myself hypnotized and didn't respond well to the exercises. Then we'd deal with my issues, with my eyes open, which worked better.

As much as that experience was frustrating, I still believe in his form of work much more than I would ever believe anyone who says they can help ADHD by hypnotizing them. Anyone who claims they can "cure" ADHD, anyone who makes claims about rapid improvement, etc... will not make a good therapist because that is just not how people change, it's just not that simple. If it was you'd know about it already, trust me.

kilted_scotsman
01-09-08, 09:41 AM
There are many types of hypnotherapists and it's important to check out the training and accreditation they have as well as keeping ones critical guard up during early sessions.

My wife has recently gone through a well respected and accredited training program to become a Clinical Hypnotherapist and is now taking a second more advanced course with the same organisation. However any assessments have to be graded and this is where the issues lie for it is apparent that the organisation cannot weed out those who are good at exams and yet have not really understood the concepts fully enough to make good therapists in practise.

This is true of any medical qualification and it is a reason why we should no more blindly trust a doctor than a car mechanic.

In my opinion the combination of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and Clinical Hypnotherapy works well for ADD since CBT focusses on removing the mental blocks and Hypnotherapy aims at boosting self esteem and making small do-able steps towards a specific outcome easier to acheive.

However it is entirely dependant on finding the right therapist who can tease out the issues and formulate solutions specific to your unique situation rather than going through a more prescribed set of procedures "because thats the way this therapy works".

kilt

Iluvpoptarts
02-08-08, 06:48 PM
You can go to a private psyc so it doesnt go on your medical record - jobs check it sometimes and may not hire you..
Or just approach your family doc and let health insurance take care of it - but then its on your file.