View Full Version : Helping Sensory Issues


LindaLexington
05-26-06, 08:07 PM
I have some serious sensory issues and didn't know they had anything to do with ADD until I read it in this forum.
There are clothes I can wear so I don't feel uncomfortable, and I stand apart when I'm in large crowds and even try to do that when I'm waiting in line for something....in fact I've almost lost my spot before.

Does anything help sensory issues other than avoidance....has anyone found that any medication helped with sensory issues?

livinginchaos
05-26-06, 08:38 PM
Hi there Linda!

There aren't any meds for sensory issues (that I'm aware of).
However, if large crowds are difficult and bring anxiety, meds can help that.

I have issues w/ clothing too, I don't have any tags in my shirts. Which isn't good if they have special washing instructions!

If you find that a sensory issue is bothersome you can go through desensitization.
It's a gradual process, for instance going to the mall when you know it's going to be crowded, but just look through the door. Once you're comfortable with that, next time open the door and take a step inside. Once comfortable with that, take 5 steps inside, etc, until you're able to be comfortable in that situation.

A good book to read: The Out-Of-Sync Child: Recognizing and Coping with Sensory Dysfunction by Carol Stock Kranowitz
It refers to children, but is a good book for everyone.

You can also seek a referral to Occupational Therapy. Occupational Therapists can help you cope with sensory dysfunction.

speedo
05-26-06, 08:59 PM
Linda;

There are no meds for sensory issues. It is a neurological problem, and nobody knows much about it. :(

I did find neurontin to be helpful with reducing painful response to sound due to hyperacusous... but that was due to damaged hearing, and the neurontin does help some people in that situation.


Now, as far as being in a sensory overload situation goes, I found that risperdal helps reduce the tendency for me to have a really bad experience when overloaded sensorally... but it does nothing for the sensory issues. :(

I've had very good luck with habituation, and avoidance, but some meds do help me tolerate overload a lot better. I also have a weighted blanket for calming myself on those days when I am SO agitated. Sometimes seeking sensory stimulation seems to drown out the sensory "noise" that seems to bug me no end. :faint:

I have also found that a nice hot shower is very soothing when my skin seems to literally be crawling. My theory is that strong stimulation drowns out sensory "noise". Be careful with hot showers/baths , some people with sensory problems will have reduced or even totally blocked sense of touch when overloaded. Please don't scald yourself with a hot shower. :eek: :faint: :)


Basically, if I take risperdal, I still have sensory problems, but I'm a lot less likely to go ballistic or to become agitated when my senses are overloaded. :p

One high funcitoning autistic fellow tells me that lexapro helps reduce his tendency to meltdown, etc.

From what I've read , and experienced, it looks like atypical antipsychotics , and maybe some mood stabilizers do seem to help some people cope with severe sensory issues... even though it does nothing for the sensory problems to begin with... but the use is strictly off-label, and your results may be different. At present, I use risperdal as a "rescue drug" to compensate when I am in an overloaded condition. :D


Oh, and anxiety makes sensory issues worse, so if you have anxiety, you need to manage that too. :)

Talk to your doctor.


ME :D



I have some serious sensory issues and didn't know they had anything to do with ADD until I read it in this forum.
There are clothes I can wear so I don't feel uncomfortable, and I stand apart when I'm in large crowds and even try to do that when I'm waiting in line for something....in fact I've almost lost my spot before.

Does anything help sensory issues other than avoidance....has anyone found that any medication helped with sensory issues?

LindaLexington
05-27-06, 04:49 PM
Very interesting responses...thanks.
I'll try to get a copy of The Out-Of-Sync Child ...it sounds good. Actually I kinda think of myself as a big kid.

I had never heard of risperdal. I am very anxious much of the time and my senses are heightened when I am. I know if I calm down somewhat a lot of my issues would not be as bad.

Matt S.
05-28-06, 11:51 AM
my sensory issue is based on my brain's inability to filter out sounds... paying attention to the one's that people don't notice... ie breathing, humming of lights, clocks ticking etc... the only thing with tags is that they rub up on the back of my neck and drive me nuts... the sound of corderoy pants(i hope i spelled it right) is unbearable to me too especially when i walk

speedo
05-28-06, 12:16 PM
My filters have never been very good either. Hearing problems seem to just make it a lot worse.

I more or less went through life having minor sensory issues and gave it no thought until I damaged my hearing and then it really got my attention. I started reading all I could find on adhd and sensory issues and I started asking relatives and friends questions about my past behavior. The thing that really got my attention was when a woman I had lived with for two years (and known for many years) said to me: "I always thought you were a little autistic by the way you reacted to your environment".... Another old gf saidf I was always sensitive to sound and light... and my ex wife said I seemed especially sensitive to sound.... go figure. It turns out that I'm not autistic, and I'm not an aspie, but I sure have some aspie-like traits that gave me and my doctors pause to consider the possibility.

I went my entire life and thought I was "normal"... lol, well I was normal for someone with my neurologiucal makeup... I just wasnt like everybody else... which I knew, but I never quite understood the significance until I started reading about this stuff and I started connecting the facts. It was kind of an awakening for me.

ME :D


my sensory issue is based on my brain's inability to filter out sounds... paying attention to the one's that people don't notice... ie breathing, humming of lights, clocks ticking etc... the only thing with tags is that they rub up on the back of my neck and drive me nuts... the sound of corderoy pants(i hope i spelled it right) is unbearable to me too especially when i walk