View Full Version : For those of you who went to college: Expectations vs Reality?


Djiril
06-19-06, 05:08 PM
For everyone here who's been to college, what did you expect college life to be like before you went? How did it measure up?

Did your opinions change at all in relation to stress, work, and partying?

(I am writing a paper on this in case you are wondering.)

Andrew
06-19-06, 08:18 PM
If you're collecting research for a paper, please comply with the Research Guidelines of the ADD Forums. I"m moving this thread there as well.

Johnnny
04-25-07, 11:21 AM
For everyone here who's been to college, what did you expect college life to be like before you went? How did it measure up?

Did your opinions change at all in relation to stress, work, and partying?

(I am writing a paper on this in case you are wondering.)
for anyone with ADHD, quit procrastinating lol, your smarter then all of them just do your homework

ben72227
05-31-07, 02:04 AM
for anyone with ADHD, quit procrastinating lol, your smarter then all of them just do your homeworkSimilar to my experience;). I found that most of the material wasn't beyond my level of comprehension at all. The main thing was thing I needed to study and do homework. Of course, you know how difficult that can be with ADHD, and having the allure of parties and being "free" for the first time (i.e. no parents there to tell me what to do - (i.e. "Do your homework! Study!")) can be a very difficult combination to overcome.

My advice to any people about to go to college (especially teenagers that are going for the first time) would be to take easy classes (stuff on the core curriculum - like english, communications, etc.) your first semester or two and to take about 12 hours at first (maybe more if you think you can handle it).

yolanda
06-20-07, 08:32 AM
My college experiences were good at times and fun, but then at other times, it was very difficult.Unaware of my diagnosis of ADHD/Dyslexia at the time though.

It took me way longer to study for tests than others and then I would only get a "C" for instance on a test after studying for about two weeks before it. But then someone else would get an "A" after only studying 2 days before a test.
This made me so mad, I wasn't necessarily mad at the student or the professors but just at the fact that I had to work 10 times harder than everyone else and still at times didn't get the grade I thought I deserved for all the work I put into it.

I expected college to be challenging, but some of the frustrations I encountered made me think college professors(at least most of them) were out to break your self-esteem,keep you from succeeding, or just only cared about receiving a check and no thought of making sure students understood the material. I honestly was shocked at the way some professors treated me. Don't get me wrong, their are the ones who do care.

Another reality about college that I think really bothered me the most, was the fact that alot of students were out for themselves and were so competitive against one-another. It was as if they couldn't stand the thought of someone getting a better grade than them instead of being happy for the person. Whenever someone wanted my help, I never hesitated to help. But when I needed help, I couldn't always get it. I guess as long as they succeeded it didn't matter if anyone else could. I think this way of thinking is so selfish.

The good realities of college I experienced was that you get to understamd how other's think and how you can incorporate your learning style with their's to make things work. For most jobs in the real world, you have to work with others and I think college helps to prepare you for this.

Another good reality of college is that it teaches time-management skills for most people and teaches you to do something correctly instead of just doing it.

Well, that's what I got from it.
Good luck to anyone else preparing to go to college, and for those currently attending.

GiftedMenace
07-18-07, 01:04 PM
Interesting...I had very high expectations when I started school...after a while I found that some of the courses that were mandatory were boring or I was easily distracted by what was going on around me...daydreaming...doodling...

If it was a course I enjoyed, (i.e. psychology, sociology, philosophy, etc.) I would practically follow the professor around the room...

When I return to school this fall, I think I will sit in the first row...lol...

Justin_SoCal
07-22-07, 02:02 PM
Similar to my experiencefile:///C:/DOCUME%7E1/JUSTIN%7E1/LOCALS%7E1/Temp/msohtmlclip1/01/clip_image001.gif. I found that most of the material wasn't beyond my level of comprehension at all. The main thing was thing I needed to study and do homework. Of course, you know how difficult that can be with ADHD, and having the allure of parties and being "free" for the first time (i.e. no parents there to tell me what to do - (i.e. "Do your homework! Study!")) can be a very difficult combination to overcome.
I feel the same way as both you and Johnnny. I'm very lucky that I'm intelligent and I'm able to understand all the material, and participate in extensive lectures in class about the subject. I was able to get away with not reading / hardly doing homework in high school somehow, but that doesn't work in college! I would end up doing terribly on tests due to not reading, and ended up failing out in Spring '07. I've known I have ADD, but recently decided to do something about it after my terrible year at school. I went to the disabled student services center at school which diagnosed me. They then send you to the school psyc department to be evaluated, and then to a psychiatrist. This long and tedious procedure was discouraging, and took me forever after missing appointments from being late (Definitely not an ADD friendly process). The doc tor ended up starting me off on Ritalin 5mg and let me take up to 20 over time to find my proper dosage. I didnít really notice any effect besides that first day, and once again became discouraged if Iíll ever make it back to school. He then switched me to adderall, and wow, what a difference! Itís day 3 on it, and Iím able to read / concentrate on something for more than 20 min at a time, like before. Iím a little concerned with only sleeping 5 hours a night, but thatís another topic. I look forward to returning to school now!

MaNaeSWolf
08-07-07, 06:45 PM
After school I started to study Accounting to achive my dream of becoming a CA. But after the first few months I just got too bored with the couse, similar to when I was at school I found that I understood the work immediately in class, but in tests I did badly cause of my lack of ability to study. One of the reasons I chose to study Accounting was to break the family tradition to study something arty, as my Dad, sister and Aunt are architects, and my mom an Artist. So after 9 Months at varsity i decided to change at the end of the year to the family thing. Many of my friends said I shouldnt cause Architecture is very hard and with the marks I was getting I should not aim to high (fools called me an idiot).

Well when I started studying Architecture in the second year of my varsity career I excelled in all the practical subects like design and building science. I actually the highest marks and from the start of the course. I still struggled with the academic subjects, but the success in the practical subjects motivated me. I am taking a break year now because I failed 2 academic subjects (typically) but am also pleased to know that I seem to do very well in the "real world" because here I dont need to recall facts and figures like a parrot, its mostly practical experiance that gets you places. In a way I am excited to get going next year because I am motivated again, but I am also hopeing to get my ADHD sorted from now on.

My oppinion for someone going into varsity, stay away from the highly accademic courses unless its your passion. You need to concentrate for days on end to study some of those courses, I can only manage minutes.
Another pointer, sit in front of the classes and sk as many questions as you need to, to stay interested. I ask about 3 questions ever hour in lectures, it keeps the classes more interactive and interesting. Ask a question even if it is not that important, I have had people thanking me for asking questions later, most people are too shy.
Oh, last pointer, varsity is the ideal place for a person to get over any social fears, shyness or whatever other problems you face. Face them there, if you make a fool of yourself, everyone will forget by next week, if they dont, youll probably just have a funny memory.

dede4004
08-07-07, 07:03 PM
I've wondered about my husband's choice when he went to college because of changing what he excelled in, to something he knew almost nothing about.

He was in the top ten of his class and excelled in Math and Physics. In his freshman year in college he got "bored" with senior physics and calculus, which he "aced" and couldn't understand why others saw them as difficult subjects.(weird kid)

He then transfered to another college and went into music. He played the drums in a high school band, but had no formal training or private lessons. He basically knew NOTHING about music, and was now attempting to get a degree in it.
But, he studied like mad, and having been a math major, learned music because of its correlation to mathematics. He took a lot of private lessons in percussion, and DID graduate suma cum laude and continued on until he got his master's degree in composition. Two years ago, he completed his PhD in music education.

Now, we know his decision to do this was probably the add/adhd. At times he regrets not staying with what he really excelled at, which was mathematics. It came so easy for him that he could have been an engineer or had some other career that would have been challenging and paid MUCH BETTER than education.
But, at the time he got no support or guidance to help him focus on a clear direction. He chose something that was challenging (something he knew nothing about), but was attention getting at the same time. Performing is a great way to get attention, which is what he loved and still does. But, again does't pay like other professions.

jeremynd
08-10-07, 12:24 PM
I went to college last year and started failing terribly in my second semester. I could not focus and comprehend anything the teacher taught me. I dropped out while my student loans were only at 6k.

I plan to return to college once I actually get help and get my mental problems taken care of.