View Full Version : Science brain required


Crazy~Feet
06-20-06, 01:07 AM
Ok who knows the difference between "controlled release" and "extended release" methylphenidate?

This stuff ain't right for me ok?

~boots~
06-20-06, 01:11 AM
I'll do a google for you :-) see what I can find

Crazy~Feet
06-20-06, 01:15 AM
Thanks Trace! Seems my ability to Google has gone kerflooey tonight! And all day too :faint:.

~boots~
06-20-06, 01:20 AM
I found some info here http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=38583, but not sure if it will help
CONCERTA® uses an advanced OROS® extended-release delivery system to deliver a controlled rate of medication throughout the day. Because of its unique OROS® system, CONCERTA® minimizes the ups and downs in blood levels experienced with stimulant medications taken several times a day.

Using positron emission tomography (PET), which measures dopamine transporter blockade, the investigators observed that a 90-mg capsule of controlled-release methylphenidate produces the same dopamine blockade in the brain as a 40-mg capsule of immediate-release methylphenidate, albeit at a much slower rate.

Study participants were asked about their subjective reactions to the two different capsules; those taking controlled-release methylphenidate reported significantly less detection of an effect and less liking of the effect. Detecting and liking a drug's effects signal future abuse potential. Therefore, the controlled-release preparation offers the benefit of once-a-day dosing for patients with ADHD with less likelihood of future abuse.

Crazy~Feet
06-20-06, 01:22 AM
Heh, yup, knew that, that's why I want my Concerta back in the first place. :D

~boots~
06-20-06, 01:24 AM
still more :-) from here http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/medmaster/a682188.html

Methylphenidate comes as an immediate-release tablet, chewable tablet, and solution (liquid); an intermediate-acting (extended-release) tablet; and a long-acting (extended-release) capsule and tablet. The long-acting tablet and capsules supply some medication right away and release the remaining amount as a steady dose of medication over a long time.All of these forms of methylphenidate are taken by mouth. The regular tablets (Ritalin, Methylin), chewable tablets (Methylin), and solution (Methylin) are usually taken 2–3 times a day, preferably 35–40 minutes before meals.The last dose should be taken at least several hours before bedtime. The intermediate-acting extended release tablets (Ritalin SR, Metadate ER, Methylin ER) are usually taken once a day in the morning with or without food. The long-acting extended release capsule (Metadate CD) is usually taken once a day before breakfast; the long-acting extended-release tablet (Concerta) and capsule (Ritalin LA) are usually taken once a day in the morning with or without food.

that is more sensible :-)

Crazy~Feet
06-20-06, 01:27 AM
Yes now I know for sure i have not lost it! There IS a difference~!

OK Now I am really mad LOL...somebody is getting nasty phone call tomorrow!

~boots~
06-20-06, 01:29 AM
Yes now I know for sure i have not lost it! There IS a difference~!

OK Now I am really mad LOL...somebody is getting nasty phone call tomorrow!
good luck I hope it helped...breathe, breathe.. :p

Crazy~Feet
06-20-06, 01:30 AM
**checks** yep still breathing, blowing FIRE out my ears? But breathing yes!

nzkiwi
12-05-06, 03:19 AM
I believe concerta delivers 22% of i.r methylphenidate immediately, compared to 30% for metadate cd. You are getting a smaller amount of mph initially with concerta, but more mph towards the end of the 12 hrs.

Below is a small segment of a medscape article occuring in 2002. The article is called 'A postmarketing clinical experience study of metadate cd'

A recent pharmacokinetic study comparing the bioavailability of MPH from Concerta<SUP>®</SUP> Tablets and Metadate<SUP>®</SUP> CD Capsules demonstrated that these two products are not bioequivalent.<SUP>[11]</SUP> Thus, whereas total MPH exposure was equivalent for both products (as determined by AUC<SUB>0-last</SUB> and AUC<SUB>0-http://images.medscape.com/pi/global/dingbats/alpha.GIF</SUB>), the early plasma concentrations (at 1.5, 3 and 4 hours) and early exposure (AUC<SUB>0-4</SUB> and AUC<SUB>0-6</SUB>) were greater for Metadate<SUP>®</SUP> CD, while later plasma MPH concentrations (at 8, 10 and 12 hours) were greater for Concerta<SUP>®</SUP>. Whether these pharmacokinetic differences, as well as the differences in the two products' respective drug delivery mechanisms and composition (i.e. the relative proportions of IR to ER MPH), may correlate with clinical response, tolerability, and/or patient preference.:confused:

jeaniebug
12-05-06, 01:12 PM
Yes now I know for sure i have not lost it! There IS a difference~!

OK Now I am really mad LOL...somebody is getting nasty phone call tomorrow!

Hey CF,

I'm afraid you lost me here. You switched meds from Concerta to ?? or from ?? to Concerta? Can you explain? Sorry to be so slow, just wondering! PJ

Crazy~Feet
12-05-06, 03:13 PM
Oh Jeaniebug that was such an old thread LOL...I was losing it back then, please see all the gory details here--> DIE GNOMES DIE! (http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=29706)

Do you take Metadate with any degree of success? I am just wondering now that this thread got bumped if anybody at all has success with that stuff.