View Full Version : High Startle Reflex Anyone?


Effie
07-10-06, 03:32 PM
Hello everyone, newbie here. While reading the article AD/HD and Hypersensitivities: The Princess and the Pea Syndrome, the author says that before she was diagnosed with ADD she thought she was the only one who had an exaggerated startle response to the slightest noise, her example "a sneeze from the back of a restaurant could cause me to jump a foot straight up from my chair." I read that and thought "that is me!" I was wondering if anyone else has this problem, I tried to find more information on the internet but was unsuccessful. It is soo embarrassing and I would love to know if anyone else has this problem and what they do to control it, if they do anything at all.

SB_UK
07-10-06, 04:05 PM
Hi -this may help --- ADDers and sensitivity to sound (http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=12155) --- Andrew points at the existence of other threads ... answer - 'yes' ... by the way ... one of the first things I wanted to know too ... relating to ADD ... when I first found out about the condition ... myself, personally ... I have been hypersensitized, hyoersensitive to any form of loud bang --- firework, balloon bursting ... been like this since three years old ... terrible apprehension when it comes to sudden loud noises ... and the noise itself makes my head explode --- true pain ... feels like the mind cramping ... !

SB.

lovemytiel
07-10-06, 04:51 PM
I have the same problem...it is kind of embarassing actually.

Boots
07-10-06, 05:10 PM
yeah me too.

happycat
07-10-06, 05:15 PM
Same here--not just to sound, but also to someone innocently coming from behind a tapping my shoulder--I've "attacked" more people than I care to count. I have no idea how to curb this responce, because frankly, it looks bizarre, or even like I'm trying to seek attention (becaue the best way to get people to notice you is to look like an idiot, right?;))

I've just learned to have a sense of humor about it, let those you work with know that you can be a bit more reflexive, and appologize for any attacks in advance.

FrazzleDazzle
07-10-06, 05:15 PM
This reflex is also known as the Moro reflex, and is usually developed in the infancy. Occasionally, it can be retained or left immature into adulthood. It is one of the cluster of baby reflexes. In the reading and research I've done on the STNR reflex, which is also a baby reflex, I have not found much on how to correct this. I would bet there is some kind of neurological therapy that can be done to help this, with getting in the right direction with searching for information. It's mighty uncomfortable!

Scattered
07-10-06, 06:26 PM
I definately have a very heightened startle response. I'll literally leave the ground if there is a sudden loud noise. I don't know how much is my ADHD and how much is my anxiety disorder -- since I have both they're a bit hard to tease apart.

I haven't found anything that helps me control it -- terribly helpful response, I know!:rolleyes:

Scattered

HighFunctioning
07-10-06, 10:40 PM
Noise sensitive here as well. I nearly jump every time I am interrupted at work. It's quite annoying. I'm really sensitive to everything in the environment though, including movement (shadows, light changes in general).

tinkerbelle
07-10-06, 10:40 PM
Strangely, when a loud noise startles me I jump and stomp my right foot. Can't control it, so its kinda embarassing! I had a friend who used to sneak up on me and say "boo" just to watch me jump and stomp my foot. Silly girl! :p

boardtabitz
07-11-06, 12:01 AM
Strangely, when a loud noise startles me I jump and stomp my right foot. Can't control it, so its kinda embarassing! I had a friend who used to sneak up on me and say "boo" just to watch me jump and stomp my foot. Silly girl! :pbetter than peeing your pants:p

Crazy~Feet
07-11-06, 01:09 AM
Noise sensitive here as well. I nearly jump every time I am interrupted at work. It's quite annoying. I'm really sensitive to everything in the environment though, including movement (shadows, light changes in general).Ditto, but add odd smells to the list too. Sometimes nobody smells these things but me and my DD, but trust me...they reek and distract us to no end! :faint: Curse you, Mystery Stench!

fasttalkingmom
07-11-06, 03:31 AM
"a sneeze from the back of a restaurant could cause me to jump a foot straight up from my chair." I read that and thought "that is me!" I was wondering if anyone else has this problem

I'm just like this, I also scream when startled.

A few weeks back my daughter and I were in a store ( my husband was outside in the car) my husband decides to sneak up behind me. I was startled and let out a scream. That'll teach him..... :D Everyone stopped to look.

SB_UK
07-11-06, 05:14 AM
Regardless of ADD - most will jump out of their skin when played 'extreme noise terror' too loud ... unexpectedly ... from right behind ... ... ... but the ADDer often has a much lower threshold ... for 'stomping'

Almost as if the perceptual stream has a higher bandwidth in ADDer ... the ADDer is more sensitive ... is taking in more of the spectrum of information which is flowing from without {through our senses} to within ...
A larger volume of data streaming in through our senses would have to be handled.

Cramp occurs when the muscle loses its capacity to operate physiologically. Hyperfunctioning - non-regulated - useless - incapable of standard aerobic functionality.
To function under aerobic conditions.
The nerve has a lag phase - following firing - during which it may not fire.

Cramp for the nerve would be kinda' like a shutdown in normal physiological functioning (think your leg falling asleep) ... loss of neural functioning --- the ability to hear - by overloading the system [think a power surge which blows out circuitry} - is bad --- prevents the nerve from doing what the nerve does --- transduce outside RRReality into a perceptual stream, which'll be filtered by the sensorium and used to form our internal models of rrreality.

The ADDer would be expected to react to loud noises in this way - if the ADDer is pulling in more information from the environment and structuring this information into a form - the mind ... which is of more complex nature than the basic nonADDer model of mind. A form capable of storing a richer map of rrreality. The ADDer would also have the experiential perspective of an individual who is hyperaware - to the environment ... yes ... but perhaps --- to the environment which soaks around the afferent signals leading to mind ... from outside --- if it 's cold (external environment) ... but from the inside too ... if you're hungry (internal environment) - internal homeostatic mechanisms which reach conscious awareness ...

Darn --- all ...IMHO... :-)

SB.

Effie
07-11-06, 07:52 AM
Thank you soo much everyone. You dont know how much better I feel about this, now I know that I am not crazy.

Lunacie
07-11-06, 11:49 AM
I'm pretty sure I get the AD/HD from my dad, but I get the startle-reflex from my mom. Dad loved to sneak up behind Mom and touch her or speak to her and make her jump. He thought it was hilarious. I don't know why she put up with it.

Yesterday I was in the grocery store and some impatient guy behind me reached past me to get a bag of frozen veggies out of the cooler. I was aware he was there and didn't flinch when he reached past me, but when he began tossing the crackly noisy bag of veggies from one hand to the other... EEEP ! I almost sat down on the floor and cried.

Myomancy
07-12-06, 10:35 AM
This reflex is also known as the Moro reflex, and is usually developed in the infancy. Occasionally, it can be retained or left immature into adulthood. It is one of the cluster of baby reflexes. In the reading and research I've done on the STNR reflex, which is also a baby reflex, I have not found much on how to correct this. I would bet there is some kind of neurological therapy that can be done to help this, with getting in the right direction with searching for information. It's mighty uncomfortable!There is a decent body of evidence to say that these reflexes, often known as primitive reflexes, are connected to and possibly cause ADHD and dyslexia.

An example of one these reflexes is the grasp reflex. This is what triggers a babies hand to grasp a object placed into its palm. Imagine if you kept this reflex and tried to write with a pen. The sensation of the pen will cause the hand to grasp the pen rather than gripping it normally. Such a handicap is going to make writing neatly very difficult.

There are several treatment programmes that are based on removing primitive reflexes.

INPP have been researching this area for 30 years and wrote the book on the subject.

Stopping ADHD is a book by O'Dell and Cook, based on their experiences running a clinic for ADHD sufferers.

The Infinity Walk. A book but I've not read it.

You can find more about this on my website (see my sig). I would post the direct links but the moderators have warned me that I'm not allowed to do that.

Chris

(http://www.Myomancy.com)

FrazzleDazzle
07-12-06, 02:37 PM
Chris, does "The Infinity Walk" go into therpies for these reflexes? Or do you know of other places that mention them? My son and I are currently doing the Bender Program, in the book you mentioned "Stopping ADHD" for the STNR.

I have been on your site numerous times, and it is very informative! Thank you very much for the time and energy you put into it!

Myomancy
07-13-06, 04:41 AM
Chris, does "The Infinity Walk" go into therpies for these reflexes? Or do you know of other places that mention them? My son and I are currently doing the Bender Program, in the book you mentioned "Stopping ADHD" for the STNR.
Checking there website, the Infinitiy Walk (http://www.infinitywalk.org/) doesn't specifically target primitive reflexes. However I believe that it will help with the neck based reflexes.

How are you getting on with the Bender Program? I really liked the book but I was concerned that the exercises were a bit complicated to learn from the book.

Thanks for the kind words about Myomancy.

Bean Delphiki
07-13-06, 05:28 AM
Yup, I have a wicked bad startle reflex. People have been commenting on it my entire life. For several years now (since I learned what it was), I've been explaining exaggerated startle, because people always seem to think they can spook me out of it somehow.

It's a neurological soft sign (NSS), by the way.

meadd823
07-13-06, 06:24 AM
Yup, I have a wicked bad startle reflex.

Thanks for getting us back on topic Bean!



I've "attacked" more people than I care to count.

Although I have never attacked any one I have been known to spin around with my fist raised.

I am especially prone to pro-active action if this ”sneaking up on me” is done when I am outside after dark, action potential increases with unfamiliar surroundings. Approaching without me being aware is a rarity I have sensitive hearing. To walk up behind me in a way that sounds like sneaking then attempt to make any sort of physical contact with out first speaking (in an attempt to startle) has landed more than one person on the ground.

I am odd if I am walking in a dark area I am not familiar with and I hear “two footed” steps approaching I do not necessarily act like I have heard the approach . . .but I do. Weird as I am people usually do not startle me more than once. :o



Ditto, but add odd smells to the list too.


I do the sound thing but Gary can smell. His nose is soo sensitive I think he can smell the neighbors flatus. Makes him really good at taking out the trash before it gets too full. ;)




There is a decent body of evidence to say that these reflexes, often known as primitive reflexes, are connected to and possibly cause ADHD and dyslexia.

The cerebellum is the area of the brain that controls coordination and balance. It also plays a role in memory, another problem area for dyslexics


I am sorry to disagree here but I have dyslexia I have neither problems with coordination nor long memory(which is execellent-btw). As a matter of fact, many dyslexics depend on their long term memory to cover up for the struggle reading.

I do not know haw many posters here have dyslexia besides me (this discussion would need it's own thread) however I do believe almost every one here has ADD!

I think I agree more with SB's explanation for us ADDers being easily startled, it seems to fit my experience and knowledge better.

barbyma
07-13-06, 12:14 PM
This reflex is also known as the Moro reflex, and is usually developed in the infancy. Occasionally, it can be retained or left immature into adulthood. The startle reflex discussed here is not actually the "Moro reflex". The Moro reflex is present at birth, not developed after, and diappears at about 4 months of age unless there is a severe delay of normal brain development.

The term doesn't refer to being startled; it refers to the specific behavior a newborn child engages in when they are startled (throwing arms and legs wide, etc.).

For ADHDers, the reason we startle more easily than "normals" (and, believe me, OP, you're not alone!!!) is we maintain a level of alertness that is slightly greater than normal.

Alertness is a form/state of attention.

barbyma
07-13-06, 12:16 PM
Ditto, but add odd smells to the list too. Sometimes nobody smells these things but me and my DD, but trust me...they reek and distract us to no end! :faint: Curse you, Mystery Stench!AT LAST! I KNEW I wasn't alone in this!

When a neurologist does an examination, one of the first things they do is test smell sense.

I occasionally have "supernose" - my term for that enhanced sense of smell one gets with certain hormone levels (like during pregnancy).

I occasionally can't smell what others can.

But, the most interesting thing is the occasional strong and strange smell that comes from nowhere and nobody else smells!

barbyma
07-13-06, 12:21 PM
There is a decent body of evidence to say that these reflexes, often known as primitive reflexes, are connected to and possibly cause ADHD and dyslexia. Please provide citations.

Several members, include myself, have done reviews of the literature on this subject and have found absolutely nothing that supports these statements or the effectiveness of these so-called treatment programs.



You can find more about this on my website (see my sig). I would post the direct links but the moderators have warned me that I'm not allowed to do that.

Hmmmm.... there's a direct link in your signature, isn't there?

There are some good reasons for this restriction. One is that it is difficult to understand one's motives when there's an obvious dollar to be made.

Paws13
07-13-06, 04:44 PM
I do have those reflexes sometimes... but usually I just have regular reflexes, like when I caught someone's book in midair before hitting the ground.

Instead of good hearing, my ADD gave me impecable eyesight... I can actually read in the dark :D

tinkerbelle
07-13-06, 05:54 PM
better than peeing your pants:p
Too true !! Now THAT would be embarassing! :eek:

FrazzleDazzle
07-14-06, 12:48 AM
Here is some more information on the moro reflex, that when believed to be retained, is speculated to cause us to react the way we do! Me included. :-) I hate thunder, it's embarrasing. This interests me a lot.

http://www.dyslexiamovement.com.au/reflexesadvanced.htm


"This is the alert reflex and causes the release of adrenaline in the body. The arms can move and there may be a sharp intake of breath. Function: This reflex warns the baby of a change in its environment. The change may be in sound, e.g. a loud noise, or sight, e.g. a bright light. Also a change in position such as dropping the baby will stimulate this reflex. The baby does not filter these stimuli and so the Moro reflex is automatically activated. Interference:
The retained Moro Reflex is another very disruptive influence on the life of the child and, unless addressed, will continue to disrupt the adult’s life. It has more social consequences. Because the child is unable to filter the various stimuli in its daily life, it is on alert far too often. Therefore its sense of security is underdeveloped. The child may be clingy and shy. Sometimes the feeling of insecurity creates a more aggressive reaction, the need for self-defense is irrationally overused. The child will over react to small changes, perhaps a substitute teacher or change of plans- situations that should be easily coped with. A child may hate loud noises or be easily distracted. The reason for the reaction is the inability to rationally deal with the unexpected. The Moro reflex over rides the rational thought processes. The panic mode is activated before the reason can be absorbed. Student’s ability to concentrate is obviously affected. Consequently, sequencing and memory skills are poor.

When the Moro reflex is activated, the body produces adrenaline. If this continues to be produced unnecessarily the presence of this hormone in the body can inhibit the immune system, leaving the person more vulnerable than others to sickness."

This site has more information on all of the primitive reflexes and what it can mean in the learning environment when believed to be retained.

Here is a trial that was conducted on a program instituted to help children with retained reflexes. For what it's worth, it's interesting food for thought anyways.
http://www.dyslexiamovement.com.au/Lancet/Lancet.htm

Myomancy
07-14-06, 05:19 AM
Please provide citations.
Several members, include myself, have done reviews of the literature on this subject and have found absolutely nothing that supports these statements or the effectiveness of these so-called treatment programs.

Hmmmm.... there's a direct link in your signature, isn't there?

There are some good reasons for this restriction. One is that it is difficult to understand one's motives when there's an obvious dollar to be made.I would be very interested in reading those reviews. Is there a thread you can point me at?

The moderators said its OK to have a link in Sig but not to link to specific articles and I understand and respect the restriction. Though it makes it hard to point out evidence that supports my point of view.

My motives is to spread information so that people can make informed choices. I appreciate that the same could be said for spammers but spammers don't normally hang around to discuss the issues.

barbyma
07-14-06, 03:08 PM
I don't have them organized and on stickies like some of the members do, so I'd just do a search.


The moderators said its OK to have a link in Sig but not to link to specific articles and I understand and respect the restriction. Though it makes it hard to point out evidence that supports my point of view.Well, links to articles should be all you need. For those of us that conduct research, failing to cite a peer-reviewed source would result in not getting published, so it's the appropriate source IMO.



My motives is to spread information so that people can make informed choices. I appreciate that the same could be said for spammers but spammers don't normally hang around to discuss the issues.Spoken by an obvious newbie! :D :p

We actually get a lot of "trolls" in here that join, post on or start a bunch of threads endorsing this treatment or that treatment, then defend their statements for several days before finally abandoning the forum.

Hang around; you'll see them! They tend to pop up in groups of 2-3.

Crazy~Feet
07-14-06, 05:29 PM
Hang around; you'll see them! They tend to pop up in groups of 2-3.Heh...they tend to get spotted quickly by people like me :D old moderator habits die hard.

I do not care much for SPAM in a can or otherwise.

Crazy

*~ §EEK ~*
07-15-06, 12:21 AM
I am sorry to disagree here but I have dyslexia I have neither problems with coordination nor long memory(which is excellent-btw). As a matter of fact, many dyslexics depend on their long term memory to cover up for the struggle reading.
I agree in some respects meadd! :)

I have dyslexia and have never had a problem with coordination or long term memory.

However, a friend of mine who has ADD is a klutz. He drops and breaks stuff all the time, and seems to regularly injure himself too.

As for long term memory, I would say that my ADD not my Dyslexia effects my short term memory more than my long term memory.

For example, when someone calls and leaves a telephone number on my answering machine. I can't just listen to the number on the answering machine and immediately recall the number. I have to write the number down or I'll immediately forget the number.

And since things have to get into short term memory before it can make it into long term memory, I guess I would have to concede that long term memory would/could be effected by this short term memory issue that I have.

However, once I have gotten it into my long term memory, I would challenge anyone to a long term memory match. In fact, my long term memory regularly amazes my instructors and fellow classmates. It often amazes me too! But if you ask me how I can remember these facts, I honestly have no idea how I can remember them. Heck, I can even recall stuff clear back to when I was only two years old, which my mother confirms are true, and it amazes her that I can remember that far back.

But tell me your telephone number, or even if I am reading the number out of a telephone book, I can't remember the number 2 seconds after reading it (Or hearing it). It drives me nuts that I have such a problem with my short term memory. I don't know, maybe it's because the numbers are just to insignificant to remember or something.

As for the startle thing. I don't startle easily. In fact, I don't even jump during a scary movie or thunderstorms. But lately I have noticed that at work (I work the night shift alone) whenever the security guard walks into my department and I am busy doing paper work, the security guard startles me every time! I think he thinks it's funny by the way that he chuckles about it! Which makes me think that he does it on purpose sometimes. Perhaps a punch in the nose the next time he does it will solve the problem! LOL :D JK.... :)

Peace,

barbyma
07-15-06, 12:41 AM
However, a friend of mine who has ADD is a klutz. He drops and breaks stuff all the time, and seems to regularly injure himself too.
Lack of "grace" and problems with coordination are common among ADDers, but they are not universal (few characteristics of ADD are, though).



As for long term memory, I would say that my ADD not my Dyslexia effects my short term memory more than my long term memory. Working memory is a PRIMARY deficit in ADD, as you've noted. It's not exactly the same thing as the concept of "short-term memory".

Information can and does enter long-term memory without being maintained in working memory, so many times ADDers learn much more than they are aware. Accessing that information, though, is sometimes as difficult as maintaining it. You can't process (in OR out) what you cannot hold attention to.

If you can use strategies like elaboration, memorizing will be easier. Rote memorization seems nearly impossible for most ADDers, but elaboration seems to LOCK it in, like you describe.

Simply try to connect the information you want to remember to something memorable that you already know.

*~ §EEK ~*
07-15-06, 02:00 AM
Working memory is a PRIMARY deficit in ADD, as you've noted. It's not exactly the same thing as the concept of "short-term memory".

Information can and does enter long-term memory without being maintained in working memory, so many times ADDers learn much more than they are aware. Accessing that information, though, is sometimes as difficult as maintaining it. You can't process (in OR out) what you cannot hold attention to.

If you can use strategies like elaboration, memorizing will be easier. Rote memorization seems nearly impossible for most ADDers, but elaboration seems to LOCK it in, like you describe.

Simply try to connect the information you want to remember to something memorable that you already know.Barb you're an absolutely wonderful resource! Have I told you that yet? :)

I know exactly what you mean here.

For example, I use to have a terrible time with peoples names. Well, I still do unless I immediately think of someone else who also has the same name. For some reason thinking of someone who also has the same name seems to lock the people's names into my memory and I can then recall their name.

Now that you brought it up, I never really thought about it until now, but I also use this sort of a "Free Association" method in my college courses! Which I'm absolutely sure has a lot to do with how well I do in college now! Well, I must admit that being properly medicated for my ADD makes a world of difference too! Before I was medicated I would associate whatever I was learning with something else and would find myself completely lost down that thought process (Association) and I would find myself somewhere in Bermuda or somewhere!! LOL :D And by the time my mind got back from Bermuda the instructor was on a completely different topic!!! LOL :D Now that I'm on medication for my ADD I will still think "Bermuda", but like a flash I am back with the instructor and on to the next topic/association!

However, how can one associate a sequence of numbers with anything?? This seems nearly impossible for me to do! For example, my PIN number for my debit card! I've had the same number for years now, and I use my debit card a minimum of at least once every 2 weeks to check my balance and to get out cash! One would think that I would be able to remember this 4 digit number, but every time I try to remember it, I can't!!

Therefore I have the 4 digit PIN number written down in my billfold so that it looks like a telephone number. I even have a fictitious name written down next to this number just in case I loose my wallet! Every time I go to the bank I still have to pull that piece of paper out so I can look at what my PIN number is, and every time I see it, I think to myself, "Oh, geez I knew that!" but by the next time, I have forgotten it again! It drives me crazy that I can't remember this number.

The fact that todays phones all have telephone numbers in memory at first seemed like a wonderful function to me! However, now I can't remember anybodies telephone number since I don't have to remember them and all my telephones remember the numbers for me! I'm afraid that someday I am going to find myself in the Emergency room after an accident or something, and they are going to ask me for an emergency contact number and I'm not going to be able to remember even my own stinking telephone number!! LOL :D I feel a little anxiety just thinking about it! LOL :D Which is why I have most of my important numbers typed up, laminated, and stored in my billfold! Otherwise it might be days before anyone would even know I was injured and in the hospital! LOL :D

happycat
07-15-06, 02:47 AM
Therefore I have the 4 digit PIN number written down in my billfold so that it looks like a telephone number. I even have a fictitious name written down next to this number just in case I loose my wallet! Every time I go to the bank I still have to pull that piece of paper out so I can look at what my PIN number is, and every time I see it, I think to myself, "Oh, geez I knew that!" but by the next time, I have forgotten it again! It drives me crazy that I can't remember this number.

Seek--I can't remember pin/phone numbers either....my solution is that I just find a short pattern (for some reason, I've always been able to remember phone numbers by the pattern they create on the phone/key pad) So, for example, if your pin number is 1397, you could envision just punching in a large sqaure on the keypad.

Myomancy
07-15-06, 06:16 AM
Well, links to articles should be all you need. For those of us that conduct research, failing to cite a peer-reviewed source would result in not getting published, so it's the appropriate source IMO.
I agree with you 100% but apparently that isn't allowed because I would be driving traffic to my own web site.

Myomancy
07-15-06, 06:41 AM
I am sorry to disagree here but I have dyslexia I have neither problems with coordination nor long memory(which is execellent-btw). As a matter of fact, many dyslexics depend on their long term memory to cover up for the struggle reading.
I'm glad your physical coordination is good but this isn't common in dyslexics. For example:

Comparison of deficits in cognitive and motor skills among children with dyslexia [ pdf (http://scholar.google.com/url?sa=U&q=ftp://ftp.shef.ac.uk/pub/uni/projects/scp/lrgdocs/lrg946.ps) ] (Not sure the link is working, check the study via Google Schoolar)

The children with dyslexia performed significantly worse than the same-age controls on most tasks, and significantly worse even than the reading age controls on phoneme segmentation, picture naming speed, word flash, bead threading and both blindfold and dual task balance. Overall, the performance of the 16 year, old children with dyslexia was no better than that of the 8 year old normally-achieving children, with some skills being significantly worse, and some better.

There are several other studies on motor skills and dyslexia or ADHD, all find a significant number of dyslexic have poor coordination skills.

With regards memory, I was referring to short term rather than long term memory and yes, being dyslexic doesn't mean you cannot have a good short or long-term memory. However dyslexics tend to have poor short-term memories.

meadd823
07-15-06, 07:15 AM
I would like to remind every one that the subject of this thread is about being easily startled,

Please keep this in mind out of respect for the member who began this thread with a specific question.

Any one is welcome to begin discussion about another topic by beginning a new thread or doing a search on that topic and adding to an already existing thread.

Those interested in the discussion of sensitive “sniffers” is invited to the thread hyper linked below.

Sensative to smells discussion already in progress (http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=30718)

Sorry for the interruption, please carry on!


***Note: any comment regarding this moderator note or any staff action is invited to private message me or one of the other moderators. Please do not post questions to staff on the thread I would like to avoid any further disruption of this discussion Thanks***

janet1969
07-16-06, 01:06 AM
I am the same way, and I don't know what to do about it.

Janet

sosninity
07-16-06, 02:49 AM
I always smile at this topic because my kids used to refer to me as "What's that noise?" since I was always saying that phrase in an anxious tone.

My high school boyfriend nicknamed me Miss Muffet after the character in the nursery rhyme: "Along came a spider, and sat down beside her, and frightened Miss Muffet away."

I take Risperdal for anxiety and OCD, and it usually keeps the jumping and gasping to a minimum.

*~ §EEK ~*
07-16-06, 04:30 AM
Seek--I can't remember pin/phone numbers either....my solution is that I just find a short pattern (for some reason, I've always been able to remember phone numbers by the pattern they create on the phone/key pad) So, for example, if your pin number is 1397, you could envision just punching in a large sqaure on the keypad.
That's a wonderful idea! :) I'm going to try that!

Thank you Happycat! :)

barbyma
07-19-06, 01:55 AM
I agree with you 100% but apparently that isn't allowed because I would be driving traffic to my own web site.:confused: Links to articles would be driving traffic to your website???

Is your website a peer-reviewed, online academic journal? Those are the kinds of articles you would need to support a claim made about ADHD.

Myomancy
07-20-06, 09:25 AM
Is your website a peer-reviewed, online academic journal? Those are the kinds of articles you would need to support a claim made about ADHD.On all the relevent articles on Myomancy I link to the scientific study I'm talking about. Often, such as recent article I did on the size of the cerebellum, I link to several different studies.

There are times in disucssion such as this one when it would be easier to say "if you want more information on topic X, you can find links to several studies here... and some commentry on why I think they are interesting".

There are also times when people are seeking information on a subject not covered by scientific journals. Such as "has anyone tried teatment X?" If I've written 2000 words on my expereinces with treatment X then giving them a link to the appropriate article on Myomancy is the sensible approach.

barbyma
07-20-06, 06:26 PM
On all the relevent articles on Myomancy I link to the scientific study I'm talking about. ...
How difficult would it be, then, to cite or link those same articles here?


There are also times when people are seeking information on a subject not covered by scientific journals. Such as "has anyone tried teatment X?" If I've written 2000 words on my expereinces with treatment X then giving them a link to the appropriate article on Myomancy is the sensible approach.It may seem sensible, but what would that provide that you couldn't cut and paste? And how is this not "covered by scientific journals"??

I have found absolutely NO subject that is not addressed by someone in the scientific community. Sure, there are many areas that need more research before conclusions may be drawn, but that's hardly the same thing.

I can't imagine that anyone asking for experiences about a treatment isn't at all interested in whether or not the treatment works. That's a question that cannot be answered with any amount of words about a person's experience.

Crazy~Feet
07-20-06, 07:16 PM
Brief OT moment (sorry Tamm) real quick ok?

Barb, I try out there, I really do and then I find stuff like this:

http://forums.families.com/add-adhd-facts-amp-schedule-ii-substances,t3479


...last post is mine and of course the OP has never replied :rolleyes:
and I think of you fondly, then go tracking down the source of this madness:

http://www.mansprincesswomansknight.com/Mans_Princess_Womans_Knight_Chapter_One_Page_5.htm

:eyebrow: and that activates my high startle reflex (hah! I worked it in!) because it never fails to startle me how truly ridiculous some people are...and I remember you again and regroup for another go at fighting the madness.

Crazy (currently cogitating a way to get this nut [from the links] into a polite debate forum and tear into him nicely)

barbyma
07-21-06, 07:43 PM
http://forums.families.com/add-adhd-facts-amp-schedule-ii-substances,t3479


...last post is mine and of course the OP has never replied :rolleyes:
and I think of you fondly, then go tracking down the source of this madness:

http://www.mansprincesswomansknight.com/Mans_Princess_Womans_Knight_Chapter_One_Page_5.htm

... because it never fails to startle me how truly ridiculous some people are...and I remember you again and regroup for another go at fighting the madness.
May I say NICE JOB?

It's a frustrating and time-consuming pursuit that seems to sum up to spinning wheels, but I still think that every post that counters the bunk chips away at ignorance.

I hope you continue! I get so tired and jaded sometimes....

Crazy~Feet
07-21-06, 08:00 PM
May I say NICE JOB?You may, and I thank you. May I also say that I needed to hear that too? As perky and upbeat as I tend to come off sometimes, I remain human in the end and it helps to know someone notices I am trying...not to mention correct!

It's a frustrating and time-consuming pursuit that seems to sum up to spinning wheels, but I still think that every post that counters the bunk chips away at ignorance.Indeed it is, but it appears this is hard-wired into me. As far as I can tell, I was born with that driving need to get to the facts of the matter and an utter lack of tolerance for ignorance. I have to admit I have gotten much better at expressing myself without pushing away my target audience as I have gotten older? But yes, I feel like I am fighting that proverbial elephant in the living room that nobody else seems to see some days.

I hope you continue! I get so tired and jaded sometimes....No doubt I will continue :soapbox: I have inspirations to look to now...and I had to let you know you were one of them. Its the same battle and the same cause after all.

That stupid forum is having PM issues now :faint: and its driving me up a wall! I am finally getting some feedback from staff over there, and cannot get through to them by PM. I will continue to try, because what I really want to see is that post deleted entirely and replaced with my correct information.

That guy is such a *******, I cannot and will NOT respect what he posted as "facts" on some kind of "differing opinions" concept. Its not about his opinions, its about facts!

And I remember you again. Thanks Barb!

Crazy *still cogitating and still fighting the good fight*

VisualImagery
07-21-06, 08:40 PM
It is very interesting to see so many ADD people who are hypersensitive. I too have a super sniffer, sensitive hearing, and startle easily.

I took my son and friends to see Independence Day for his birthday. In the scene where they are starting to dissect the "dead" creature, you see its appendages move, you know something is going to happen, you can feel it, you are ready for it... Then, BAM, it hits the window. I jumped out of my seat screaming. Everyone else in the theater was just sitting there calmly watching the movie. :o

My son and his friends still laugh about it.

One question about hearing. I can hear all sorts of little noises and far off things but I have a hard time figuring out lyrics to songs and often miss or don't hear dialogue on TV programs. Any input?

Crazy~Feet
07-21-06, 08:50 PM
One question about hearing. I can hear all sorts of little noises and far off things but I have a hard time figuring out lyrics to songs and often miss or don't hear dialogue on TV programs. Any input?My memory might be failing me (it often does) but for some reason HighFunctioning came to mind when I read that?

Forum search engine search lyrics maybe?

Worth a shot anyway.

Crazy (heeeeeelp gimme a bucket!)

HighFunctioning
07-21-06, 10:22 PM
One question about hearing. I can hear all sorts of little noises and far off things but I have a hard time figuring out lyrics to songs and often miss or don't hear dialogue on TV programs. Any input?My memory might be failing me (it often does) but for some reason HighFunctioning came to mind when I read that?



I'm sure your memory isn't failing you this time. I've mentioned this before, relating to APD (auditory processing disorders). Those with APD/CAPD (whatever you want to call it) have difficulty with decoding spoken words, have hypersensitive hearing (overamplitude), slow processing speed, etc. Auditory processing run along a continuum, and one would have to have a significant impairment in order to get a diagnosis, but that is the heart of the matter. Auditory processing issues seem to be somewhat common around here, but we haven't had a poll in quite a while.

VisualImagery
07-21-06, 10:28 PM
Thanks Highfunctioning-I will check that out. There seems to be a name for everything.

There is one for the very uncoordinated and clumsy-forgot what it is called. Someone here will know though.

Crazy~Feet
07-21-06, 10:41 PM
I'm sure your memory isn't failing you this time. I've mentioned this before, relating to APD (auditory processing disorders). Those with APD/CAPD (whatever you want to call it) have difficulty with decoding spoken words, have hypersensitive hearing (overamplitude), slow processing speed, etc. Auditory processing run along a continuum, and one would have to have a significant impairment in order to get a diagnosis, but that is the heart of the matter. Auditory processing issues seem to be somewhat common around here, but we haven't had a poll in quite a while.Thanks HF :) I really am doubting my memory tonight. I am having a bADD day and that helped me. I also remember why I was foggy about this in the first place :rolleyes: ugh! Hard to know when I am making sense or not!

Crazy

Who Me ?
08-29-07, 11:44 AM
Although I have never attacked any one I have been known to spin around with my fist raised.Wow !
Same here.
A fairly timid, but pleasant Indian colleague snuck up and dug me in the ribs from behind while I was standing watching something on a wall-TV.
I too, spun around with a raised fist - which must have been a bit intimidating, 'cos I'm a big guy.
I didn't hit him either - but he went running off to his superior and I was told I "needed to calm down".
Well, I'm a reasonably calm person (considering) - so that particular criticism didn't go down too well, lemmetellya.

My mum had a terrible apprehension of bursting balloons.
I don't have that - but a do JUMP pretty far if startled.

A weird and I feel, related upside to this attentional state is that when I'm tired to the point of unconsciousness while driving - no matter how many times I nod off, I ALWAYS wake myself within a split second ... always.
Indeed, I can even hear my consciousness switching on and off - I'm aware of all sound momentarily ceasing and then starting again.
Very strange to retain an awareness that continues to feed back to your thinking mind RIGHT TO the point of unconsciousness.
But that's only occurred when I've been sleep deprived on a daily basis for a number of weeks.
Funny thing consciousness.

Crazygirl79
08-29-07, 08:08 PM
The simple answer to this is YES!! and it's highly annoying!

Selena:)

higgledy
09-09-07, 11:09 PM
Could it be that everyone in this thread has Auditory Processing Disorder along with ADHD? I just read that up to 80% of people with ADHD also suffer from APD. My son was just diagnosed with APD, before this I never knew APD even existed. But one symptom of APD is intollerant of loud noises.

Foxie
10-17-07, 10:34 PM
I've always been very jumpy ... you can be talking to me and jump or scream and I'll damn near **** my pants.

kilted_scotsman
10-20-07, 06:52 AM
I didn't really become aware of my startle reflex and issues with noise etc until kids came along. Random crashes, thuds etc and its like my brain rings like a bell, I can almost feel the reverberations in my skull. And as for wailing kids.....I have to leave the room.

kilt

Matt S.
10-20-07, 11:35 AM
I jump like a little chihuahua sometimes when I am over sensitive

speedo
10-20-07, 05:14 PM
yah, a sudden noise will make me jump.

When my hyperacusis was acting up a sudden noise would completely disorient me.

ME :D

Skully
10-22-07, 10:02 PM
I do not startle easily to noise but do to touch. I am very sensitive to touch and it makes me jump a mile when someone touches me and I did not expect it.

kk115
02-08-09, 08:45 AM
If there was one thing I could change in my life, it would be this!

The most annoying thing about it is how it affects watching movies. Sometimes i can't take it and fast forward to see if there is anything to make me jump.

The actual startling sucks, but the anxiety that lingers while preparing for it is even worse.

pADDyjay
02-08-09, 11:05 AM
not all the time...but sometimes Ive come close to hitting my head on the ceiling .....

Wintermute
02-08-09, 12:07 PM
Haha, It's good to know that it's common with ADD'ers to be hypersensitive :)

I've always had a way too strong sense of smell, which drives me nuts. Any sort of snoring, lip smacking, or repetitive noises (dripping faucets) will make me absolutely murderous within seconds.

BUT, to go along with thread's title, I AM EXTREMELY easily startled. In fact it's become quite the past time for my coworkers to startle me when they walk by my department. I'm so damn bored all day that most of the time I'm back there I'm in my own little la la land, and the tiniest things will jerk me out of my daydreaming very violently. Just someone calming saying "Hi" will make me jump. It must make people think I'm up to no good....to be so jumpy all the time....

dormammau2008
02-08-09, 02:56 PM
hummm i reatc less myself soooo i look for that kind buzz so to speak but i do understand! from other things i suffferrrr argophbira issss much likewhat your tlking about and faer hights and needls soooooo theres no easy way around it i take mints i do when iam feeling like this to defr my attaion eles were dorm

stef
02-08-09, 03:11 PM
I'm easily startled, even at home; I usually jump & say aah! (but not really yell out) if I don't hear my husband coming (he still thinks this is hilarious - I mean, we live in an apartment...).
my friend's Dad once startled me (on purpose), when my friend & I were young. We were making a snack in the kitchen - I was buttering an English muffin and threw a knife full of butter right into her hair!

INaBOX
02-08-09, 04:13 PM
I've never noticed this thread. This is totally me!! I get so irritable when I hear loud unexpected noises .. my kiddo is notorious for doing this too. I get easily startled (and squeal). I get the "you're so jumpy" comment all the time.

ladyditz
09-24-09, 12:48 AM
Yaaaay--
I am soooo thankful to Google for making the link to this thread high enough to find before my getting sidetracked to something else. I decided to "research" extreme startle reflex after DH's claiming, "That violent a reaction is not normal" (I screamed and jumped at hearing his voice less than a foot behind me.)

Hah! I printed out no less than 3 pages of the comments from this thread for his "reading pleasure," and dang it if I don't test it on him later, too! (Old teaching habits die hard.) I know 3 pages might have been overkill, but as usual I couldn't help myself. At least I didn't give him the whole 9 pages I'd collected from various places. (I've only been Dx'd ADHD, but he swears I'm OCD also . . . )

It's not like the extreme reaction was the first time it has happened, either, but he just doesn't "get it" despite going to the neuropsych with me several times to have the way I am explained to him and how to cope with me. I'm thankful he loves me in spite of my ADHD.

OK--thanks for letting me babble a bit. :D

madelefant
12-03-09, 08:29 PM
I have an extremely high startle response. Just about anything new or sudden puts me in overload. I think it is a great problem when doing almost anything because startle response puts you into fight or flight which is run or fight. When you at work and someone says something obnoxious to you and this puts you into it (yes, mental panic can trigger it) you can't think straight. It also means that any amount of teasing or agitating by persons can knock you completely off your game.

loverainbow
12-30-15, 04:41 PM
This is me! I startle easily. I jumped. Squealed. I hate that people thinks I am just faking it. Stop scaring me for God sake.

FinallyDxed!
11-05-16, 09:42 PM
It seems like some find noise physically painful while some are startled and or/feel anger/agitation. I am definitely the latter. I think the noise sensitivity is more anxiety and past trauma-related while the other sensory sensitivities were with me since I was a child and likely related to ADHD. Nothing is "painful" but definitely VERY uncomfortable and irritating...and distracting.

Little Missy
11-05-16, 09:59 PM
I'm a screamer. In a store, down the road, someone saying "hello" you'd think I've never been in public, if my name gets called waiting somewhere I just plant myself and scream.

So far it has been fairly receptive and not too out of hand. Loud, but quickly subdued. Then I smile.

Tetrahedra
11-07-16, 03:03 AM
This is a THING? Hell, I'm so easy to startle. I'm terrified that someone will think it's awesome to scare me, as some people in my office had a habit of scaring each other for awhile. (Fortunately not anymore.) Sometimes people just say my name loudly and I jump.

Wuvmy3kitties
11-12-16, 01:51 PM
I am the same way at work! But that's usually because it's so quiet. Ppl laugh about it and I've come to the place where I can, too.

DJ Bill
11-12-16, 07:28 PM
I definitely have a high startle reflex for noises, or sudden movements. I can't stand the sound of a slammed door, dropped large item, or loud radios.
Smells don't seem to affect me as I don't have much of a smeller left. A sudden flash of light, someone interrupting me when I don't know they are there are other triggers. If I expect the noise to happen it is no big deal. It's the unexpected noises I jump at.

Sneaking up on me and surprising me might tend to be bad for a person. My bro did this once and got hit with a bowling ball. (Never sneak up behind someone about to drop their ball. )

If I unlock a supposedly empty room and walk in on someone there, my heart jumps a mile.

Old topic but good!

aeon
11-12-16, 08:21 PM
The combination of GAD, ADHD, Dexedrine, and a history of chronic trauma means I often jump like a bunny rabbit. Sometimes that comes with vocalization, and is potentiated by caffeine.

One particularly spectacular response at work in a group setting led to some gentle teasing, with someone asking "whoa, are you in federal witness protection, or something?" :p

Funny now, but I felt a bit embarrassed at the time because my startle response is well and truly far from what might be reasonably considered normative for a person, and I may know why, but I'm not keen on explaining the reasons to just anyone, so I remain a curious source of spectacular expression, and I only want to be that for those things I can choose and control, not for the things I cannot, and so remain at the mercy of.


Whaaa!,
Ian

stef
11-12-16, 08:53 PM
most people at work now know to say something when they.re near the door of my office or I.ll jump and give a slight shriek. very embarrassing