View Full Version : ADHD causing depression?


Jett
07-15-06, 02:49 PM
I am beginning to wonder if it is ADHD causing me to be depressed.

For example, I have poor impulse control without medicine. I also heard that people with ADHD are prone to addictions and have trouble quitting an activity even though it is destructive.

Due to having to take a sleeping pill, I tried switching from adderall-xr to concerta. The concerta didn't really help but the adderall does. I switched back to adderall today and am feeling much better. Concerta did not help me with my impulse control or hardly any of my symptoms.

I have been feeling depressed every day I am on concerta. I don't know if it is the medicine itself, though. With adderall, I have the control not to give into my impulses about eating fattening food. I am not hungry all the time and I was eating healthy most of the time, exercising, and actually caring about myself. I even was taking vitamins and drinking filtered water!!

This past week been sleeping a lot and eating junk food. I could care less about myself. Now today the feelings of wanting to take care of myself and feeling better are back. My sense of humor is back and I don't feel like a zombie. I enjoy having feelings and having emotions as long as they aren't too overpowering and I can control them. I enjoy feeling like a human being.

I am sure that concerta works really great for some people but my body just doesn't accept it and doesn't tolerate it well.

Oh yea my adderall helps me keep my temper. I used to have a horrible time controlling my temper.. I could be so verbally abusive when angry. Occasionally I had destroyed property( like break a window, throw something) or physically lash out on people. I have not completely lost my temper in over 4 months.

I can now stop and think before doing something I will later regret. I no longer hurt people I love. I don't hurt anybody and the feeling is great.

Ok, maybe I am getting a little off topic but the whole time I was off adderall, I was taking my anti depressant but it didn't seem to work, either. I am beginning to wonder if I watch my diet, exercise, and take my adderall everyday if I can just stop my anti depressant.

My pdoc thinks I am also bipolar but I am doubting that, too.

What do you all think?

geckogirl
10-30-06, 07:52 AM
I have done a lot of research into depression (I'm a research psychologist) and I also have ADD and have a history of episodes of depression. I have a theory that the reason that people with AD/HD get depressed more often is because they have more trouble controlling their thoughts. I reckon it is because of rumination. A lot of research says that people who ruminate are more likely to get depressed, have worse depression and to have it for longer. Being on meds I don't ruminate. I was on an antidepressant before I was prescribed dex. I had to come off my antidep in order to take the dex because the interaction between the two was dangerous so I couldn't take them together. Anyway, my antidepressant worked really well for me, but I reckon the dex is better. I am able to control my thoughts so that I don't ruminate and I experience much less anxiety on my dex! I should do a survey about the rumination thing.

peridot
10-30-06, 03:40 PM
geckogirl,

Your reply to this thread interested me a great deal. Rumination was indeed a factor in the MDD I had until I was 36, when I started impramine (tofranil) -- not a much used drug anymore, but that was 18 years ago and it's been very good to me.

My depression was characterized by fear, panic, inability to eat etc. rather than the sterotypical apathy, immobility etc. And I don't think my ADD caused my depression (I wasn't dxed ADD until 3 years ago), but I notice now that some of the drug info sheets ( I can't remember the technical term) and some other sources have suggested that TCA's may also help with ADD.

So I don't ruminate as much anymore (partially because I'm now somewhat aware of it starting and have more ability to stop it), but I'm still forgetful, unfocused, impulsive etc.

And when I tried Strattera it worked very well to begin with, but then it seemed to make me apathetic, sad etc. -- and ruminative. I seemed to keep thinking about the emptiness of life (cheery, yes?) which is why I tried Strattera twice and gave it up twice.

I apologize for subjecting you to this self-absorbed babbling, but, as I said, after reading your message, I thought "well, I'll be damned" or "eureka!" or some similar thought (By the way, I know the "damned" will be deleted, and I'm perfectly fine with that, but what in the world is going on at the thread about "this community should be a democracy and the moderators are depriving me of my rights"?)

Matt S.
10-30-06, 03:49 PM
I was depressed and I guess it had to do with denial. Impulse Control at the core of the onion of my complex issues and Overcompensating by exact opposite extremes fuel that problem... i.e. High IQ etc. My method to continuing the pattern of overcompensate in that area created denial in the sense that I am in the toddler stage of my development there on top of that combine not knowing how to relate time and planning to my 'normalcy' ideal with wanting the immediate results the fastest... it hurts your pride to know that excessive learning and the "positive aspects" of adhd are often overcompensation for lacking in one area especially when the concept of common sense doesn't have any meaning to me and the concept comes to me from complex analysis... Denial is terrible when knowledge can't substitute for experience

piglet
03-11-07, 04:41 PM
I ruminate too much, fersure. I need to have a voice in my head that kicks in at those times, like maybe James Earl Jones, saying "Put the thought down and step away!" My depression was fueled by that rumination; I do find the Adderall helping. Also, self-hypnosis, just training my brain to go elsewhere, to happy and empowering places instead of chewing on old dark stuff. I had a great talent for burying my feelings and self-medicating with legal substances like food, and losing myself in books and other flights of fancy so I wouldn't have to tackle real life.

I had a tendency to put dark feelings so far under that I didnn't recognize them until much, much later, after I'd ruminated; and then bringing the issue out long after it was over for everyone else. Like, years later, I'd realize, "Hey, I'm really angry about this", and I'd let 'em have it; of course, that's not the way I want to treat my nearest and dearest, really. I am training myself to stop ducking things and feel them a little closer to an appropriate time; feeling them when they happen would be nice, and maybe someday I'll be able to do that.

QueensU_girl
03-11-07, 06:23 PM
Considering that ADD makes us be underacheivers in usually more than one area of life (TM), ofcourse we would likely have secondary depression and/or anxiety.

Makes sense.

This is why giving meds for 2ndary depression so often fails...

Antidepressants dont' fix ADD, and they don't fix Skills Deficits.

Similarly, I see this with adjustment disorders and treatment resistant depression. Pills cannot fix other social factors (e.g. serious family problems; losses; trauma; personality or developmental issues).

piglet
03-11-07, 06:34 PM
Queens U Girl, I admire you. I'm glad I get to benefit from your wisdom.

AsmodeanForsakn
05-28-07, 02:18 PM
I certainly agree with the thoughts in this thread, I was apparently diagnosed with depression at age 7 but I always have had trouble keeping my emotions & impulses in check, getting frustrated & breaking things etc etc. I remember how shattered I was when I crashed out of uni 1st time around and I thought it was what was always going to happen, just like the rest of my life. Since my diagnosis, and starting on the dex, I feel like a different life is starting

Halcyon Days
06-02-07, 03:49 AM
Considering that ADD makes us be underacheivers in usually more than one area of life (TM), ofcourse we would likely have secondary depression and/or anxiety.

Makes sense.

This is why giving meds for 2ndary depression so often fails...

Antidepressants dont' fix ADD, and they don't fix Skills Deficits.

Similarly, I see this with adjustment disorders and treatment resistant depression. Pills cannot fix other social factors (e.g. serious family problems; losses; trauma; personality or developmental issues). I agree with this. I have always felt like I haven't lived up to my potential and that I haven't been at the level of my peers. I have a Degree and a two year diploma but my marks weren't good enough to do a masters so the degree was useless and the diploma was in computers and I've spent the last 3 years and three different jobs that lasted a total of 1.3 years over 3 years. My last job made me completely lose all confidence in myself as a programmer and I've pretty much given up on ever being happy in any way shape or form...

So yeah, I would say that it isn't ADD itself but the results of having ADD that cause the depression. It would cause depression in anyone.