View Full Version : Seeking information on inattentive ADD


D.B. Cooper
07-22-06, 12:54 AM
I've googled and looked in the usual places but have pretty much come up dry. What im looking for specifically is scientific and study related papers. Something i can give to my GP/Shrink that will at the very least prove the existance of this strange cousin of ADHD. I realize this is a rather obscure subject so i dont expect very much.

Crazy~Feet
07-22-06, 03:10 AM
I've googled and looked in the usual places but have pretty much come up dry. What im looking for specifically is scientific and study related papers. Something i can give to my GP/Shrink that will at the very least prove the existance of this strange cousin of ADHD. I realize this is a rather obscure subject so i dont expect very much.Hello D.B and welcome. I would presume a licensed pyschiatrist would have a copy of the DSM-IV (wouldn't they? :confused: If not, I dunno what the world is coming to!).

First of all, the latest version of the DSM has labeles the disorder as ADHD and assigns 3 types:

DSM-IV Criteria for ADHD
I. Either A or B:



Six or more of the following symptoms of inattention have been present for at least 6 months to a point that is disruptive and inappropriate for developmental level:


Inattention



Often does not give close attention to details or makes careless mistakes in schoolwork, work, or other activities.

Often has trouble keeping attention on tasks or play activities.

Often does not seem to listen when spoken to directly.

Often does not follow instructions and fails to finish schoolwork, chores, or duties in the workplace (not due to oppositional behavior or failure to understand instructions).

Often has trouble organizing activities.

Often avoids, dislikes, or doesn't want to do things that take a lot of mental effort for a long period of time (such as schoolwork or homework).

Often loses things needed for tasks and activities (e.g. toys, school assignments, pencils, books, or tools).

Is often easily distracted.

Is often forgetful in daily activities.




Six or more of the following symptoms of hyperactivity-impulsivity have been present for at least 6 months to an extent that is disruptive and inappropriate for developmental level:


Hyperactivity



Often fidgets with hands or feet or squirms in seat.

Often gets up from seat when remaining in seat is expected.

Often runs about or climbs when and where it is not appropriate (adolescents or adults may feel very restless).

Often has trouble playing or enjoying leisure activities quietly.

Is often "on the go" or often acts as if "driven by a motor".

Often talks excessively.


Impulsivity



Often blurts out answers before questions have been finished.

Often has trouble waiting one's turn.

Often interrupts or intrudes on others (e.g., butts into conversations or games).




Some symptoms that cause impairment were present before age 7 years.

Some impairment from the symptoms is present in two or more settings (e.g. at school/work and at home).

There must be clear evidence of significant impairment in social, school, or work functioning.

The symptoms do not happen only during the course of a Pervasive Developmental Disorder, Schizophrenia, or other Psychotic Disorder. The symptoms are not better accounted for by another mental disorder (e.g. Mood Disorder, Anxiety Disorder, Dissociative Disorder, or a Personality Disorder).


Based on these criteria, three types of ADHD are identified:



ADHD, Combined Type: if both criteria 1A and 1B are met for the past 6 months

ADHD, Predominantly Inattentive Type: if criterion 1A is met but criterion 1B is not met for the past six months

ADHD, Predominantly Hyperactive-Impulsive Type: if Criterion 1B is met but Criterion 1A is not met for the past six months.


American Psychiatric Association: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision. Washington, DC, American Psychiatric Association, 2000.




So its all ADHD but we all kind of use the term interchangably around here, since the understanding of the existence of hyperfocus in ADDers means that the term "Attention Deficit" is a bit inaccurate with regards to the experience of the people who have it. Its more like "Attention Inconsistency" since most of us can focus quite well on something that holds our complete interest.

HTH! Please keep us posted as to how it goes with your doctor.


Crazy :)

~boots~
07-22-06, 03:30 AM
well done Crazy :-) How quick are you on the mark today!!!:D

Crazy~Feet
07-22-06, 03:34 AM
well done Crazy :-) How quick are you on the mark today!!!:DMy post count is almost to Custom Title status...yipeeeee!

Now I was going to go with Dances with Hunters (ties in nicely with Crazy~Feet I think) but the respose I got over Finder of Lost Posts has me reconsidering...nuts!

Maybe I will have to ruun a poll a few hundred more posts down the line. Whattya think?

Crazy (.........up for debate at this time...........)

SnappyCloud
07-22-06, 03:42 AM
Welcome Cooper (I hope you are not using your real name).

I can understand that your GP might be clueless about ADHD, but if your shrink needs this information, RUN and find a qualified one.

This board will provide you information to have an informed talk with your shrink and possibly to assess h/her level of knowledge. I told mine I had ADD eight years before he diagnosed me by an inocent comment I made to him- I had never brought up the subject since he had ruled it out

Today there is no excuse to be uninformed about adult ADD.

D.B. Cooper
07-22-06, 06:42 AM
Welcome Cooper (I hope you are not using your real name).

I can understand that your GP might be clueless about ADHD, but if your shrink needs this information, RUN and find a qualified one.

This board will provide you information to have an informed talk with your shrink and possibly to assess h/her level of knowledge. I told mine I had ADD eight years before he diagnosed me by an inocent comment I made to him- I had never brought up the subject since he had ruled it out
.
(if im using my real name the fbi would like to have a chat im sure http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D.b._cooper )

My p-doc knows what it is as he's familiar with the numerous other more obscure disorders i've been diagnosed with (SAD, Dythymia) im just looking for a little ammunition for when i finally do drop this on the good doctors.

~boots~
07-22-06, 08:32 AM
(if im using my real name the fbi would like to have a chat im sure http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D.b._cooper )

My p-doc knows what it is as he's familiar with the numerous other more obscure disorders i've been diagnosed with (SAD, Dythymia) im just looking for a little ammunition for when i finally do drop this on the good doctors.LOL....we have to ask :D

jeaniebug
10-01-06, 11:44 AM
Hey Coop, where is the money? I get a kick out of your name. Perhaps people younger than me (us?) don't know who D.B. Cooper is . . . . .

Like you I am looking for information to support diagnosis of ADD. Good thread topic!

Rock on! :cool:

scuro
10-01-06, 11:49 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sluggish_cognitive_tempo

Are you looking for this? which came from the Barkley link at the bottom of the entry.
He also talks about here. ->http://www.schwablearning.org/Articles.asp?r=54

inquisitive
11-07-06, 11:44 PM
hi all ... there are quite a few research papers on the existence of ADHD-I (predominantly inattentive type) online, however the majority require subscriptions or payments to obtain the whole paper.

none-the-less, here are some citations + links, if youre still interested

Mililich, R., Balentine, A., and Lynam, D. (2001) ADHD Combined Type and ADHD Predominantly Inattentive Type Are Distinct and Unrelated Disorders. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice. 8(4) : 463 (http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1093/clipsy.8.4.463)

Carlson, C. (2002) Sluggish Cognitive Tempo Predicts a Different Pattern of Impairment in the Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Predominantly Inattentive Type. Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology. 31(1) : 123-129 (http://www.leaonline.com/doi/abs/10.1207/S15374424JCCP3101_14)

Hinshaw, S. (2001) Is the Inattentive Type of ADHD a Separate Disorder? Clinical Psychology : Science and Practice. 8(4) : 498 (http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1093/clipsy.8.4.498)

Barkley, R. (2001) The Inattentive Type of ADHD As a Distinct Disorder: What Remains To Be Done. Clinical Psychology : Science and Practice. 8(4) : 489 (http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1093/clipsy.8.4.489)

hope it wasnt too late ... hope it helps :)

-inquisitive-