View Full Version : does this sound right?


lunaslobo
08-31-06, 08:34 AM
when i was diagnosed about a year ago now, my doctor put me on meds but nothing else. No therapy, no coaching nothing. At first i thought well mabe this goes on a lot, but sinced I have been coming here I really am doubting her. I belong to a hmo so i dont have a lot of choices in drs but how am i going to get better if i dont do all I can for this?:eyebrow:

boone1
08-31-06, 08:40 AM
Ive never received any therapy or anything like that either, im not on medication either so im completely on my own.


Ive got another appoinment with my doctor and I'm going to ask him about therapy or possible medication but he is one of the only pediatricians in my area so my appointments in 2 months! :eek:

Proscrire
09-05-06, 05:39 PM
Hmm, opposite happened with me. It was highly suggested that I also seek counseling when I got my diagnosis, but my doc focused in ADHD as well as being an ADDer herself. In my opinion one cannot rely on one's gp for this, and should seek out counseling or support groups or coaching on one's own if it is not otherwise provided. My doc was to busy being a doc to do coaching or therapy bue she did point me in the right directions when I asked.

Faylen
09-06-06, 07:04 AM
You need two separate docs for this. The one who prescribes isn't a therapist, and a therapist can't prescribe meds. My feeling is that meds without therapy isn't going to help much - you need to learn how to do things better and understand yourself or all the meds do is make you feel better. You're not going to learn how to organize, adapt, socialize, or like yourself because you're taking a pill. Don't wait for your psychiatrist to tell you to get therapy, although he/she might be able to recommend a therapist.

buffalopc7
09-21-06, 05:21 PM
Well, literally you don't need two separate doctors, however the HMO's aren't yet willing to pay for you to see a psychiatrist; the only mental health professional who can prescribe medication. I will add that its, in a way, to your advantage. Psychiatrists are medical doctors and their training reflects that, with a handful of courses actually in mental health among the physiology, etc.. They have excellent medical training, however their mental health training isn't as comprehensive as that of a psychologist or even a social worker or mental health counselor. Given all that, and because you are in an HMO, you will likely have to request a referral for counseling/therapy from your promary care physician. You will have a certain number of appointments that the HMO will prescribe (and will compensate for, excluding your copay). After that, should you and your therapist believe that you require more appointments, you will have to have an appeal sent (likely by your physician and therapist) for further treatment. Its a pain, but worth it for you to get both pharmaceutical and therapeutic interventions, which indeed (as Faylen mentioned) have much more long term effectiveness than medication alone (for further info on that fact, specific to ADD/ADHD, read Dr. William Pelham's articles (google)). I'm glad you questioned what didn't make sense, you are absolutely right!!!!!

~boots~
09-21-06, 05:38 PM
My doc didn't suggest therapy...I get all the therapy I need right here :-)
This is the best therapy going (for me anyway) , and it's FREE

buffalopc7
09-21-06, 06:26 PM
Physicians often don't suggest anything further than medications and i've heard several different reasons why. BY nature, HMO's "encourage" (for want of a better word and to remain within the confines of political correctness) physicians that it is to their advantage to be cost effective. Providing medication, but not suggesting anything further (unless medically necessary as defined by the HMO) is cost effective. There are a few physicians who have reservations about the viability of therapy/counseling, and there are some who simply don't realize that its a more enduring solution than medication alone. Its really to your advantage as a client of medical services to understand what is available to you and to request the services you feel you need.