View Full Version : Sugar linked with mental problems in Norway study


*~ §EEK ~*
09-29-06, 03:59 PM
Sugar linked with mental problems in Norway study
Thu Sep 28, 2006 4:45pm ET

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Oslo teens who drank the most sugary soft drinks also had more mental health problems such as hyperactivity and distress, Norwegian researchers reported on Thursday.

Their study of more than 5,000 Norwegian 15- and 16-year-olds showed a clear and direct association between soft drink intake and hyperactivity, and a more complex link with other mental and behavioral disorders.

They surveyed the students, asking them how many fizzy soft drinks with sugar they had a day, and then questions from a standard questionnaire used to assess mental health. The teens who reported skipping breakfast and lunch were among the heaviest soft drink consumers, Dr. Lars Lien and colleagues at the University of Oslo found.

"There was a strong association between soft drink consumption and mental health problems among Oslo 10th graders," they wrote in their report, published in the American Journal of Public Health.

"This association remained significant after adjustment for social, behavioral and food-related disorders."

Most of the students said they drank anywhere between one and six servings of soft drinks per week.

Those who drank no soft drinks at all were more likely than moderate drinkers to have mental health symptoms, the researchers said. But those who drank the most -- more than six servings a week - had the highest scores.

For hyperactivity, there was a direct linear relationship -- the more sodas a teen drank, the most symptoms of hyperactivity he or she had.

The worst problems were seen in boys and girls who drank four or more soft drinks a day. Ten percent of the boys and 2 percent of the girls drank this much.

The researchers said it was possible that other substances in the soft drinks, such as caffeine, were to blame for the symptoms, and they did not check other possible sources of refined sugar in the children's diets.

But they said many of the teens were clearly drinking too many sugary drinks. Norway's recommended intake is 10 percent of the day's total calories from sugar and the researchers said at least a quarter of the boys were getting this much from soft drinks alone.

"One simple and effective measure to reduce soft drink consumption in this age group would be to remove soft drink machines from schools and other public places where adolescents gather," they wrote.

From: http://today.reuters.com/news/articlenews.aspx?type=healthNews&storyID=2006-09-28T204517Z_01_N28374556_RTRUKOC_0_US-SUGAR.xml&pageNumber=1&imageid=&cap=&sz=13&WTModLoc=NewsArt-C1-ArticlePage1

Yeah
09-29-06, 04:04 PM
So the more hyperactiv norwegian kids are, the more they like soft drinks? :)

VisualImagery
09-29-06, 04:09 PM
Hey seek, in behavior disorder class they reward with soda and candy all the time! Hmmmmmm-I will remain off my soapbox on that one though! :D

However, the Norway study can only show corelation, not cause and effect. I didn't see any information about food intake, and whether they had well-balanced meals or what other extranneous variables might have affected the results. I do agree that all kids drink too much soda-and schools that have banned the sales of sodas and replaced them with healthy drink choices acturally earn as much if not more money from the sales of juices etc.

As a teacher, I get tired of seeing these kids drink soda all the time and eat such unhealthy food, I wonder how much if affects school performance!

Thanks for the article seek, Illinois is working on banning the sale of sodas in schools, at least k-8, we are the fattest state in the US and the only or one of the few that now require 4 years of PE-designed for personal fitness for a life-time, though I believe kids will always hate pe! :)

RADD

scuro
09-29-06, 04:11 PM
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For hyperactivity, there was a direct linear relationship -- the more sodas a teen drank, the most symptoms of hyperactivity he or she had.

I'm not going to say much about this study, except that the above correlation is a no-brainer. Many Soda drinks contain caffeine, which is a stimulant.....what type of drink do you think an unmedicated ADHD kid is going to choose? ...and which population will drink more Sodas?

Bet you would find the same correlation with coffee and unmedicated ADHD adults.

VisualImagery
09-29-06, 04:14 PM
They talk through both sides of the can in my opinion!

Groups Blast Proposed Junk Food Ban in Schools
By Susan Jones
CNSNews.com Morning Editor
February 12, 2004

(CNSNews.com) - Educators and soft drink industry representatives see nothing sweet in a proposal to ban soft drinks and candy in vending machines in Illinois schools -- all schools, public, private and parochial.

It's another unfunded mandate that will likely do nothing to solve the problem of obesity, said a press release issued by the National Soft Drink Association.

The soft drink industry is mobilizing opposition to the proposal floated by Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich in December.

"When kids can buy all the soda and all the junk food they want, whenever they want, even in school, the fact that we're seeing more and more health problems among children shouldn't come as a surprise to anyone," said Blagojevich in announcing the proposed ban.

"We need to stop sending mixed messages to our children, by teaching them about nutrition in the classroom, and then selling them soda, and candy, and all kinds of junk food only a few feet away."

Illinois House Bill 3974 would amend the School Code, so that as of Jan. 1, 2005, each school would have to prohibit soft drinks and candy from being dispensed to students from school vending machines.

But a number of education officials and education groups say state lawmakers should let school districts address the issue themselves.

According to the National Soft Drink Association, the education groups opposed to the soft drink ban include the Illinois Principals Association and the Illinois Coaches Association, among others. The objections in many cases boil down to local control -- and money.

"This is just another example of trying to fix a societal problem by laying it at the school house steps," the press release quoted Dave Turner, executive director of the Illinois Principals Association, as saying.

"We are spending a great deal of time, resources and political capital on this issue while, in the meantime, more than 75 percent of our schools are facing budget deficits and local principals are being forced to lay off teachers as they struggle to keep up with the requirements set forth by the No Child Left Behind Act."

Robin Miller, Executive Director of LUDA (Large Unit District Association) said local school districts should decide what food and beverages to offer students.

"The governor, in his state of the state address, said if you believe in your local schools, then you should show it by giving them more control. Why take away the decision making power of schools now on this issue? Especially when individual schools are already looking out for the best interests of their students by determining where vending machines are placed, the hours of operation, the variety of beverages and how the revenue is spent," Miller said.

According to the soft drink industry, more than half of the beverages in school vending machines are non-carbonated, including as water, juice and sports drinks. But critics, including the American Academy of Pediatrics, complain that many of the drinks are full of sugar and calories.

In a Jan. 6, 2004 policy statement, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommended that school districts across the country "restrict the sale of soft drinks to safeguard against health problems that result from overconsumption."

But, argues the soft drink industry, studies show that "demonizing" soft drinks can backfire, because it makes some students want them all the more -- the "forbidden fruit" theory.

"The focus should be on finding meaningful solutions to the problem of childhood obesity," said Susan Kundrat, a sports nutritionist who counsels student athletes at Northwestern University and the University of Illinois.

"It's important that we educate children about how to choose a balanced diet overall, and not simply promote a 'good food, bad food' mentality. Kids need to learn it is okay to consume all foods and beverages in moderation."

Moreover, she added, "We know that many high schools have open campuses for lunch, so students already have access to a variety of beverages at convenience stores and quick-serve restaurants, and they also bring them from home."

At a time when many school budgets are in the red, the revenue that comes in from vending sales is critical to the existence of many school programs, the press release noted.

"Illinois ranks near the bottom of the nation when it comes to per capita funding of education. How can the state ask schools to just give up an important source of revenue with no thought to how that funding will be replaced?" said Jim Rosborg, Superintendent of Belleville School District 118.

"What's ironic is that it will actually force many schools to cut back on sports and other physical activities -- in other words, the very programs that actually help reduce obesity."

Link: Copyright 1998-2006 Cybercast News Service (http://www.cnsnews.com/ViewNation.asp?Page=%5CNation%5Carchive%5C200402%5 CNAT20040212a.html)

VisualImagery
09-29-06, 04:22 PM
I am trying to stay away from political issues so won't say what is on my mind-but this is the outcome of the proposed ban on soft drink sales in Illinois. Remember, money talks. But, schools are free to ban sodas if they like! Many do! With no decrease in funding for sports. Oh, I won't get on that soapbox either! :)This is today's :soapbox: One question though-Why do we need a total approach before making necessary changes to improve children's health? Ah, big beverage companies have big bucks to fight for the right to profit from contributing to obesity, diabetes, poorly nourished school children, extra work for custodians......:soapbox:



No go for junk food ban in Illinois schools
http://img.novisgroup.com/img/imgFNU/blank.gif
By Lorraine Heller
4/14/2006- A proposal by the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) to ban schools from selling junk food and soda has been blocked by a legislative committee on the grounds that it does not provide a “total approach” to child nutrition.



The Joint Committee on Administrative Rules (JCAR), which reviews proposed changes in state regulations, voted 10-1 against the ban on Tuesday.

The proposed changes would have prevented the sale of junk food, such as sugary soft drinks, candy and chips, in elementary and middle schools during the entire school day. Foods and beverages allowed included fruit and vegetable drinks, nuts, seeds and cheese.

But members of JCAR prevented the filing of the new rule, as they claimed it set “nutrition standards that are substantively problematic as they do not provide a total approach to child nutrition through diet, nutrition education and exercise.”

Another concern was that the regulation preempted the purview of the State Task Force on Wellness that will consider the issue of school nutrition and report to the Governor and the General Assembly by January 2007.

JCAR also said the proposal “largely excluded local school district input and expertise” in its development.

However, the ISBE has no plans to back down.

“We’re ready to work with JCAR and address any concerns they may have in the new proposal we will submit,” said ISBE public information officer Meta Minton.

“We remain hopeful that we’ll have the new regulations in place for the coming school year. With the current obesity crisis, it just makes sense that children shouldn’t have access to junk foods with high sugar, fat and calorie content,” she told FoodNavigator-USA.com.

However, she was unable to say what kind of restrictions the new proposal is likely to contain, adding only that there are “plenty of options on the table.”

Illinois authorities are not the first to look at implementing restrictions on the sale of junk food in schools, in response to concerns over the growing incidence of childhood obesity.

Elementary schools in Arizona, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Nebraska, New Jersey, New York, and West Virginia have already banned the sale of junk food in schools until at least after lunch. And other states have gone even further. Hawaii bans junk food in all schools all day. Florida bans the sale of junk food in elementary schools all day, and in secondary schools until after lunch.

Indeed, despite the fact that the current proposal was blocked, the restriction of the types of foods sold in schools has attracted unprecedented interest in recent years, and is not an issue likely to disappear.

Just last week a bill was introduced in Congress proposing a radical overhaul of the nutritional standards for foods sold in schools.

Introduced by a group of senators and representatives, the new bill- the Child Nutrition Promotion and School Lunch Protection Act of 2006- aims to revise the current definition of ‘foods of minimal nutritional value' that are permitted for sale in schools. The current definition, which dates back to 1979 and which focuses on whether a food has at least minimal amounts of one of eight nutrients, has been accused of being obsolete.

The new definition is designed to conform to current nutrition science.

“Nutrition science has evolved and expanded,” states the bill, adding that the current definition of school nutritional standards is “inconsistent with current knowledge about nutrition and health.” “Disco-era nutrition standards don't make sense in 2006. When you have an obesity epidemic, schools shouldn't sell candy at recess, potato chips for lunch, and soda throughout the day,” said Margo Wootan, nutrition policy director of consumer watchdog Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI), which supports the legislation. Lead sponsor of the new measure is Senator Tom Harkin, a long time advocate of, and campaigner for, healthy school food standards.

Copyright - Unless otherwise stated all contents of this web site are © 2000/2006 – Decision News Media SAS – All Rights Reserved. For permission to reproduce any contents of this web site, please email our Syndication department: contact our Syndication department (http://www.foodnavigator-usa.com/feedback/index.asp?type=4&page=%2Fnews%2FprintNewsBis%2Easp%3Fid%3D67098). Full details for the use of materials on this site can be found in the Terms & Conditions (http://www.foodnavigator-usa.com/misc/misc.asp?idmisc=6).

*~ §EEK ~*
09-29-06, 04:28 PM
I figured this article would spark some interesting conversations! :)

Scattered
09-29-06, 06:18 PM
I'm not going to say much about this study, except that the above correlation is a no-brainer. Many Soda drinks contain caffeine, which is a stimulant.....what type of drink do you think an unmedicated ADHD kid is going to choose? ...and which population will drink more Sodas?

Bet you would find the same correlation with coffee and unmedicated ADHD adults.You may be totally right, Scuro. The thought occured to me too that caffeine seeking behavior may be the issues, however, when I quit eating sugar in eighth grade (I had never used caffeine), my grades skyrocketed. It may have been puberty or some other variable or a combination of things, but at the time I sure thought sugar was the big change. I'd love to see a better designed large study with effects of sugar over time.

It makes sense to me that if ADDers have less glucose utilization to start with and then have a sugar spike followed by a sugar low after the insulin kicks in that their brains might really end up a bit sugar deprived since the brain doesn't store sugar like other organs do.

Scattered

scuro
09-29-06, 06:56 PM
Repeat after me, correlation does not equal causation. That means that if A happens and then B happens, it doesn't mean that A caused B!! That was the first lesson I learned in Psych 101. For instance, there is a very strong relationship between the number of churches in any given area and the number of bars in that same given area. Does this mean that Christians are drunks?

I can see the newspaper title now;

:eek: :):)Greater alcohol consumption linked to Christianity, in multiple studies around the world! :):) :eek:

...and the thing is, that link would hold up because where ever there are churches in this world, there are also bars. You can find examples of this in your nearest population centre.

So Scattered, I'm not discounting your experience, but care must be taken to link the two in any sort of public discussion. Other less educated people may think the one caused the other. This may be true but then again it may not be. Sorry to harp on this but I think it is an important point and a common problem of media/ science literacy in society. In your particular case, it would be best to start any such statement with, "It's been my personal observation that....."

By the way, I drink a fair bit and....hmmm :D

VisualImagery
09-29-06, 07:13 PM
Hey, energy drinks make me feel better-but they work on regular people too. After a bottle or two of Bawls, no one knows who is ADD or not!

This is too vague a study to put much stock in-best purpose is to stimulate research, but a much better designed study needs to establish controls, random samples, compare ADD/ADHD kids to kids with ADD/ADHD/LD and kids without any of these disabilities. Each category would need a placebo soft drink group, a caffienated soft drink group, and then the results would have to be compared. A standard level of ingredients would have to be used in the two forms of soft drink using only one additive at a time-or you cannot get valid results. How will the reliabiltity of the test be determined? What would be the ideal number of test subjects? A baseline activity level would need to be established to determine what level would define "hyperactivity." How will it avoid researcher bias? The compound that needs to be researched appears to be caffiene. I would love to see studies done on this!
Extraneous variables that are controllable include:

Ethnicity
Comorbids
Age
Gender
General health and physical condition
Extraneous variables that are uncontrollable include:

Lack of control of what the kids actually drink unless they are kept in controlled living quarters!
Diet-healthy or junk food?
Compliance-do they drink the required # and finish all of it?
Unknown health problems
This is why research is peer reviewed-and even that is not fool-proof! Designing a valid study is difficult and time-consuming. Too much research is not well thought out, fluff, or influenced by the researchers bias.

But as scuro correctly and succintly stated, consuming caffiene would be the same for unmedicated add adults-although coffee contains much more caffiene than soda!

My researchers mind is going through all the steps of designing a study-Thanks Dr. Waugh-I really did learn and remember what you taught in Research Methods and Training Design and Evaluaton!

RADD

VisualImagery
09-29-06, 07:23 PM
Repeat after me, correlation does not equal causation. That means that if A happens and then B happens, it doesn't mean that A caused B!! That was the first lesson I learned in Psych 101. For instance, there is a very strong relationship between the number of churches in any given area and the number of bars in that same given area. Does this mean that Christians are drunks?
:eek: :):)Greater alcohol consumption linked to Christianity, in multiple studies around the world! :):) :eek:

By the way, I drink a fair bit and....hmmm :DScuro, the absurd headline makes a good point-as Mark Twain said, there are lies, dam lies, and statistics.

And, people use test scores as proof of things that are untrue-did you know that ACT and SAT scores do not predict college success? But they are still the foundation of designing curriculum for college prep courses. Gotta get a high score. Good for admission, but useless after that! Parents just don't realize, profs don't give a flying leap about test scores or GPA's-they want to know if you can and will do the work!

Scattered, where is the info on the sugar concentrations? in the ADD brain. I have low blood sugar always-would find this interesting to read. Perhaps we need complex carbs that breakdown into simple sugars, rather than consuming simple sugars that are immediatley utilized and then bottom out.

Great thoughts!

Hyperion
09-29-06, 09:14 PM
The researchers said it was possible that other substances in the soft drinks, such as caffeine, were to blame for the symptoms, and they did not check other possible sources of refined sugar in the children's diets.
Wow, so wait, lemme make sure I understand their reasoning here They checked he consumption of a particular foodstuff, one that sometimes, but not always, contains a known psychoactive drug in levels significant enough to cause cognitive and behavioral changes. They reported on correlations between consumption of said foodstuff and certain cognitive and behavioral problems, but didn't think that it might be important to control for the drug?

I'm not saying that the caffeine may be responsible, or that some ADDers may or may not have been more likely to drink caffeinated beverages...I'm just saying that for the researchers to not even take that into account implies that they might not exactly be the brightest bulbs on the porch.

VisualImagery
09-30-06, 12:40 AM
Hyperion, how can any researcher with at least half a brain forget about the extraneous variables and control for them? I think their filament isn't dim, it is broken. The thing that makes this kind of research a problem is that people jump to conclusions about this stuff, although drinking less soda is good, it does not make this study valid or reliable! If I had turned in a proposal for a study like that in grad school, I would have flunked research methods!

Dee dee dee, study!

*~ §EEK ~*
09-30-06, 10:17 AM
Sorry to harp on this but I think it is an important point and a common problem of media/ science literacy in society. I would be disappointed if you didn't harp!!!!!! LOL :D

BTW, unfortunately I couldn't find a better article with more technical information about the study. However, if you google "Sugar", "Mental problems", and "Norway" there is an enormous amount of websites posting information about this study all over the Internet.

1000's of parents will read this stuff and run with it and their kids will probably only get bagels, crackers, and bologna sandwiches for Halloween this year! LOL :D

This study reminds me of the 60's and 70's when they told parents that sugar was the cause of children's hyperactivity.

mrs A
09-30-06, 10:34 AM
I was wondering if anyone else has heard of the problems that dyes and additives as well as chemicals can have on people that are sensitive to them. Of course, most who are sensitive or allergic don't know it. So is it the dyes/chemicals or the sugar or caffeine?

Individual thing????

Scattered
09-30-06, 09:31 PM
:eek: :):)Greater alcohol consumption linked to Christianity, in multiple studies around the world! :):) :eek:





By the way, I drink a fair bit and....hmmm :DHmmmmm -- I don't drink? Do I need to start?:p



...and the thing is, that link would hold up because where ever there are churches in this world, there are also bars. You can find examples of this in your nearest population centre.Actually there is an actual relationship -- you're only allowed to have as many bars as there are churches in many towns by law!;)

Scattered

scuro
09-30-06, 10:32 PM
Everything, when you look at it, is a combination of chemicals. Water contains the chemicals H20. Of all the chemicals in pop, I believe red food dye has been "linked" in one study to some behaviour outcomes. Not that most pops have red food dye anyways. I don't know of any other chemical that has been clinically shown to negatively impact cognitive functions in the general population. Do you know of specific studies that show this?

Nova
10-01-06, 01:41 AM
And...there's always one site that takes it one step further...

Like this one:

http://www.mercola.com/2001/may/23/fruit_juice.htm

Which claims that:

Most of traditional medicine fails to recognize that the sugars in fruit juice contribute to major distortions of insulin balance which leads to hormone and neurotransmitter shifts which increase a child's risk for ear infections, ADHD and allergies.


I only posted this one...just to let y'all see another similar 'story', available on the net. (0;

Doesn't mean I've ever been a fan, of that 'theory', though.
Or any of them, that don't directly 'fit' with my subjective mindset, lol !


I don't do 'sugar', due to my family's diabetic history.
Got more than enough on my plate, to handle, in this lifetime, folks. (0:

And once you go 'diabetic', you can't 'go back', so that's one thing, I'd rather keep off my 'plate'...no matter how tantalizing, sugary products seem to be.

VisualImagery
10-01-06, 01:58 AM
But.... if it is on the internet it must be true........:rolleyes: :faint: At least a lot of kids will drink less soda-right?! :confused: And parents will not buy as much soda-right?! :confused: I for one will not hold my breath, I would turn blue! :D I can just hear the uproar in families across America now, as parents refuse to purchase soda for their kids. perhaps Europe too, but they don't consume soda like we do! Door, slams, "I hate you and won't talk to you anymore"! And parent grins. Continues to save money on soda while kid puts a dollar or more in the machine at school..........


RADD

scuro
10-01-06, 02:21 AM
Just for the record, I got nuttin positive to say about Soda. But it's that damn study that irks me more. ;)

VisualImagery
10-01-06, 02:29 AM
I allow myself 1 Dr. Pepper a week and usually do not drink all of it-I love this one soda, and if I crave it, will have 1 serving-and often go ore than a week. The thing with soda or any other food, like ICE CREAM Yummmy, is moderation, yes, the term seems cliched, but when I was a kid, we only drank soda at special times! It was not a grocery staple! A cosmo once in awhile, rather than binging or alcoholism! There is a big difference.

I agree with Scuro, the study sucks dirt like a vacuum. And soda really is a huge problem, PUN, sorry, and is over consumed in this country! Maybe they should urine test for this too! :D :rolleyes: Oh, don't get me going about "diet" sodas. :mad: :soapbox:

RADD

Scattered
10-01-06, 05:43 AM
Repeat after me, correlation does not equal causation. That means that if A happens and then B happens, it doesn't mean that A caused B!! That was the first lesson I learned in Psych 101. I understand the difference in correlation and causation. The two words I tend to harp on though in these discussions is the difference in causation (which twin studies, adoptions studies and such indicate to be genetic in the vast majority of cases) and exacerbation. The research I've read and my family tree back up very much the case for genetics. That said are there things an ADDer can do to make the situation worse or better? In my personal opinion, there are (although these things are merely mitigating symptoms not curing or removing them). Exercise would be a good example -- it doesn't cure ADHD but it can help an ADDer function more effectively. I believe diets low in sugar and refined carbohydrates may be of benefit also.



So Scattered, I'm not discounting your experience, but care must be taken to link the two in any sort of public discussion. Other less educated people may think the one caused the other. This may be true but then again it may not be. Sorry to harp on this but I think it is an important point and a common problem of media/ science literacy in society. In your particular case, it would be best to start any such statement with, "It's been my personal observation that....." How many qualifiers that this is just my opinion or observation not hard research do it need to use? :eyebrow:
You may be totally right, Scuro. The thought occurred to me too that caffeine seeking behavior may be the issues, however, when I quit eating sugar in eighth grade (I had never used caffeine), my grades skyrocketed. It may have been puberty or some other variable or a combination of things, but at the time I sure thought sugar was the big change. I'd love to see a better designed large study with effects of sugar over time.

I really try to differentiate when I'm sharing my opinion and or those of researched backed writings. But like others I also come here to clarify all this in my own mind as well and kicking it back and forth helps do that.;)

Along that vein of questioning, I was wondering, if it could be that there are some psychiatric conditions where there is more than just a correlation. Obviously you'd need a better study to determine that. It has been my personal observation that comorbid diagnosis tend to make ADD symtoms much worse (IE: when I'm very anxious my medication is generally much less effective). Perhaps this is part of the reason some of us have seen improvement with less sugar. Looking back, while my grades in high school took a big jump, my wandering around in a day dream didn't change at all. An ADDer who wasn't say depressed and feeling generally healthier and more clear headed might be more likely to keep at her homework even if it took a lot more time and energy than it took her friends to accomplish the same thing. Just trying to figure this out, because I've got a little ADDer an awful lot like me and I'd like to tease out every helpful thing I can to give her the best shot at success.


Anyway, have a nice weekend! :)


Scattered

garrykeane
10-01-06, 07:29 AM
Jolly good coversation folks. I only joined ADD today but alreaday getting the feedback for some of my questions. Been teaching in Thailand for 16 years now. I intend to run some reasearch of my own on this topic next term. Variables count for a great deal so I will bear in mind your comments. Any one interested in the scope of the project, or with possible considerations to contemplate, I would be interested in hearing from. regards to all.

*~ §EEK ~*
10-01-06, 08:52 AM
I think kids consume alot more sugar now days than we did when we were children. So, in that respect this study may have some redeeming value.

However, since we don't really know their study methods and they seem rather questionable, I would have to give this study a thumbs down.

As for drinking soda, I don't drink it much myself, and I don't drink diet drinks at all.

Thanks for posting everybody! :)

Scattered
10-01-06, 01:08 PM
Jolly good coversation folks. I only joined ADD today but alreaday getting the feedback for some of my questions. Been teaching in Thailand for 16 years now. I intend to run some reasearch of my own on this topic next term. Variables count for a great deal so I will bear in mind your comments. Any one interested in the scope of the project, or with possible considerations to contemplate, I would be interested in hearing from. regards to all.Welcome to the forums Garry!:) Glad you're finding it interesting!

Scattered

PS: If you're doing a study on sugar/refined carbohydrates -- one variable to attend to is when you measure the behavior. I don't believe it is necessarily the initial sugar shock that causes the most problems, but the subsequent drop in blood sugar in the brain after the extra insulin has kicked in. A good book that might give you some ideas on this topic is The A.D.D. Nutrition Solution by Marcia Zimmerman.