View Full Version : Pressured speech versus excessive talking


rascal777
10-07-06, 11:04 AM
I thought I'd ask you guys what's the difference?

I have been asked a few times during my evaluations and switching of docs if I have "pressured speech." (I have been diagnosed with bipolar as well, but I really don't think I fit the bill). I am and have always been a talker. I just have so much to say and so many opinions and thoughts that I like to share. Sometimes I go on and on, forgetting that there are two people in the conversation and my communicating becomes one-sided. I've learned through life to monitor myself and catch it if it starts happening and to force myself to shut up and listen to the other person. Anyway, can anyone give examples or explain what it is exactly?

Andi
10-07-06, 12:33 PM
Pressure of speech is a tendency to speak rapidly and frenziedly, as if motivated by an urgency not apparent to the listener. The speech produced, sometimes called pressured speech, is difficult to interrupt and may be too fast or too tangential for the listener to understand. It is a hallmark of mania and is often seen in bipolar patients during manic periods. People with schizophrenia, as well as anyone experiencing extreme anxiety, may also exhibit pressure of speech.

Pressure of speech is also variously referred to as agitolalia, agitophasia, tachylalia, tachyphasia, and verbomania.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pressure_of_speech

Pressure of speech is a subjective sign where the examiner feels that ideas are occurring to the patient faster than the patient can properly verbalise them - i.e. there is too much to say and not enough time to say it. It is a feature of hypomanic and manic illness, and may be thought of as a prelude to flight of ideas.

http://www.gpnotebook.co.uk/cache/-483065844.htm

QueensU_girl
12-25-06, 03:08 AM
Pressured Speech can happen with other disorders, too. I've seen it written in medical charts for people with nothing resembling ADHD.

My own thoughts on the possibilities:

-I think the problem with ADHD is that our brains go 100 miles/hr and our mouths cannot keep up.

-Our short term memory problems may make us fear that we will lose our important ideas, so we talk FAST to not lose the info. (ADHD is also a working memory disorder for many of us.)

-The impaired attentional filter some of us might have can make us unable to judge what is vitally important (now), and what is sidebar. Or, we also tend to verbalize our thoughts ('verbal impulsivity'), rather than filter out stuff as best being left 'unsaid'. (When our mouths can spurt out what we are REALLY thinking, and get us into trouble! <G>)

Cannot comment on how bipolar factors in; or where bipolar/ADHD begins/ends. Other features such as ANXIETY may also increase pressured speech.

I think it can also come from not listening to the body. e.g. 'Am i breathing when i talk? How am I feeling in my body? Is the message just bursting out of me?'

Trying to slow things down, and "sit with the feeling or thought" for a few moments might help, when conversing.

And, attending to the other Speaker/Listener.

Crazy~Feet
12-25-06, 04:00 AM
I say there is a difference between hyperspeaking due to ADHD and pressured speech due to bipolar. My child and I are both capable of hyperspeech and we can engage in it anytime we are unmedicated. That is to say, our minds move fast and our speech patterns echo that speed. However, we can understand each other perfectly and we make total sense the entire time. It just so happens that other people cannot understand us because of the rapidity of our speech. When asked to stop, we are able to stop.

My child and I also have pressured speech due to bipolar disorder. Pressured speech due to mania/hypomania has a drive, a "push" behind it, almost as though if you do not speak you will blow up. The ideas move too fast to make coherent sense a lot of the time, like a series of loosely connected thoughts chained together. When asked to stop, we often can NOT stop talking, because to do so would be stopping a flow that has pressure behind it. I will also type very fast and continuously when hypomanic, and I make a lot of run-on sentences then. My typing at those times mirrors my speech patterns. Pressured speech is a lot like a huge run-on senstence that grows into a paragraph...and continues.

LittleD1981
02-04-07, 05:01 AM
The impaired attentional filter some of us might have can make us unable to judge what is vitally important (now), and what is sidebar. Or, we also tend to verbalize our thoughts ('verbal impulsivity'), rather than filter out stuff as best being left 'unsaid'. (When our mouths can spurt out what we are REALLY thinking, and get us into trouble! <G>) Wow, "verbal impulsivity." That makes so much sense! I tend to talk way too much sometimes, and upon reading that, I look back and notice that during those times, a lot of what I say is probably better left unsaid, or else is completely unimportant and thus should be spared the energy of being said. :o

Matt S.
02-05-07, 10:44 AM
I have noticed that the impending doom sense with the "hyperarousal" state with PTSD can come accross as pressured speech to others as well, but that is situational. My mood episode is always mixed so if I am just complaining to complain and it's fast or if I take prozac etc. and the light shines on me per say, then I tend to go on for no reason.