View Full Version : Story on People with Disabilities in the Workplace


Hyperion
10-29-06, 09:14 PM
While this story focuses on Down's Syndrome primarily, the larger point that it makes about people with cognitive disabilities might be of interest to some people here.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/10/27/AR2006102700970.html?nav=lsc1aj


"We really have found that people with significant disabilities are capable of doing incredibly complex work as long as it's systematic," said Erin Riehle, director of the project. Most people with developmental disabilities work in stereotypical jobs, she said, like cleaning and horticulture. "Our objective was to look beyond that. We found that we could put people with Down syndrome, Williams syndrome and many other disabilities into roles that had never been considered before."

meadd823
11-02-06, 04:48 AM
Hmmmm not too sure of your exact connection here, these individuals are mentally retarded. The thing is we ADDers aren't necessarily intellectually challenged, our disabilities are not the same as those featured in the article.

With ADD our “problem behaviors” are seen as behavior that we could change because we are intelligent. Apples and oranges I believe however apples and oranges are both fruit.

Seeing some one work with ADD individuals and help find jobs and careers that better accented their abilities while downplaying the individuals ADD problem areas ( and didn't cost an arm and a leg) would be nice.

Hyperion
11-02-06, 06:44 PM
No, the connection was more the issues related to people's attitudes towards disabilities in general ("you mean they can actually be productive, normal members of society?"), as well as the observation that people with disabilities who have to work harder than anyone else just to get by are very highly motivated employees when given a chance.

However, your idea of a reasonably-priced ADHD employment agency would be a good idea. With ~5% of the population to serve, it might be possible to make a decent profit while charging a reasonable price.

meadd823
11-03-06, 10:27 AM
No, the connection was more the issues related to people's attitudes towards disabilities in general

Thanks Hyperion for your clarification. You do have a most excellent point as usual. Some times those of us who have disabilities are so use to failing or being under estimated therefore we often do not even bother trying because we do not feel capable.

I tooo believe people with disabilities should be given the chance to reach their full potential. This is good as long as the job is reasonable. Some thing I fail to see when discussing ADD as in the disorder that a lot of the reason I functioned as well as I did was I “fell” into a type of profession that meshed with my ADHD. Had I choose to do some thing like data entry that required I sit for long periods and focus on a computer screen with little or no interaction with other people would have been a lot different. Most data entry bosses do not want employees that can’t sit down and shut up, but a large majority of nursing supervisors actually prefer nurses who like to get up and move around even if they are a bit chatty. The nursing profession played into my natural need to move about and out going personality style which decreased the impairment of my ADHD (until it came to keeping a tidy med cart and charting)

Often people with ADD have been matched poorly with their jobs or careers which increases the disability effect. The misnomers don’t help us any more than they do people with Downs, or autism.