View Full Version : World’s Most Sophisticated Trojan Uncovered


Andrew
11-03-06, 09:25 PM
Oct 25, 2006

Security experts have discovered new spambot software that installs its own antivirus scanner to eliminate competition, alongside a number of other sophisticated features.

SecureWorks has described the Trojan, which it calls SpamThru, in detail. Other vendors have come up with different names for the software. One of the signs of its sophistication, though, is that few antivirus scanners are aware of it, SecureWorks said.

"SpamThru is a money-making operation, and the author takes great care to make sure that detection by the major vendors is avoided by frequently updating the code," said SecureWorks’ Joe Stewart in the company’s analysis.

SpamThru is a Trojan that turns a system into part of a network of bots designed to send out spam, a type of operation that’s been around for several years. While the Trojan’s network doesn’t seem especially large so far—at a couple of thousand bots—SpamThru shows that criminals are now able to treat spam software development just like any other commercial development endeavor, Stewart said.

"The complexity and scope of the project rivals some commercial software," he wrote. "Clearly the spammers have made quite an investment in infrastructure in order to maintain their level of income." The company has come across previous Trojans that attempt to switch off other malware, in order to maximize system resources, but SpamThru installs a pirated version of Kaspersky AntiVirus for WinGate, customized to skip files known to be part of SpamThru itself, naturally.

"It patches the license signature check in-memory in the Kaspersky DLL in order to avoid having Kaspersky refuse to run due to an invalid or expired license," Stewart wrote. It uses a custom peer-to-peer protocol to control communication with the network, which makes the bot network harder to kill. "Control is still maintained by a central server, but in case the control server is shut down, the spammer can update the rest of the peers with the location of a new control server, as long as he/she controls at least one peer," Stewart wrote.

Each client has its own spam engine, creating spam from a template that’s transmitted using AES encryption to avoid giving access to competing spammers, SecureWorks said.

By Matthew Broersma, Techworld.com

Fuse
02-09-08, 04:52 AM
Niiiice.

Well, it's bad, but I have to admire the sophistication.

meadd823
02-09-08, 05:01 AM
Annoying in a scary way really -

2puzzledparents
05-11-09, 12:02 PM
I have one better than that... Though I have yet to independtly verify. I participate in a few wireless (wifi) forums and one of the Senior members had gotten curious about MagicJack VoiP. He 'convinced' the device to dump its onboard memory into a file and discovered that the magicJack had within it copies of his cookies, histories and bookmark list. Apparantly MagicJack's parent company is making a small fortune in reselling this information. If I knew how to do a memorydump and a had access to a Magicjack.... or at least a copy of the EULA

2puzzledparents
05-11-09, 12:04 PM
As far as I know, could be a hoax