View Full Version : need help with memorizing multiplication table


~muddled~
01-13-07, 02:08 AM
i suspect my 3rd grade cousin has ADHD. he's smart but grapples when asked to explain what he has read about. but that's a different problem altogether.

right now he is struggling with the multiplication table... suggestions anyone??? i tried helping him memorize but it's not working. his math exam is in a week's time and i really want him to do well.

waiting for suggestions!

Imnapl
01-13-07, 03:41 AM
A Google for multiplication tables +tricks for learning brought up several hits. Kids in grade 3 aren't expected to know all of the multiplication table. What does his teacher expect from him?

speedo
01-13-07, 09:21 AM
you might try getting a piece of graph paper and teach him to draw a multiplication table.

Sometimes it helps to be able to visualize a problem.

Me :D

Paws13
01-13-07, 01:23 PM
A Google for multiplication tables +tricks for learning brought up several hits. Kids in grade 3 aren't expected to know all of the multiplication table. What does his teacher expect from him?
You'd be suprised... our second grade teacher wanted us to know it by heart (pure torture for me, although quite a few kids had it known x_x)

I agree with speedo; visuals are definitly a help. If you know it, the nines trick sometimes help, although I could never get it down.

Scattered
01-13-07, 01:47 PM
Music, music, music -- I have ADHD and was terrible at memorizing basic fact kind of stuff. Records (back then) or tape/CD's today with the tables to music can really help. Then just tons of repetition. It takes a lot more drill for it to stick for an ADDer. Also video games utilzing multiplication tables to shoot aliens and such can help a distractible ADDer stick with their drill longer.

Good luck!
Scattered

peridot
01-13-07, 04:50 PM
Repetition, repetition, repetition. Hard, I know. Repetition of a small chunk at a time, take break (which can vary in length based on what works for your cousin,) go to another chunk and review last chunk. Try to keep each individual sessions short. Reward success. Working one-on-one with him will probably help -- you'll have to be willing to devote some time.

Strategy varies depending on whether he's just going to be asked to recite the tables or if he's going to be asked to solve problems. If latter, you need to mix the tables for the different numbers up.

Is he only going to get one shot at this test or is it something he'll repeat until he gets it perfect? Does he have to know tables for numbers 1-12 or just some of them? That also affects your approach.

steviefranchise
01-13-07, 05:06 PM
I still remember when I was in fourth grade the teacher made us hand write the multiplication table to 9 every day for homework. We had to turn it in first thing in the morning and place it in a box on her desk.

If you didn't turn it in you knew that you would not be in her favor for the day and that was not a good thing. She just knew if someone did not do it.

I have not forgotten it ever since.

It went like this, start with 2 and go until 9.

2x2=4 3x2=6 4x2=8
2x3=6 3x3=9 4x3=12 and so forth and so on......
2x4=8 3x4=12
2x5=10
2x6=12
2x7=14
2x8=16
2x9=18
2x10=20

Hand write these until you get to 9x9 each day. You can also do 11 and 12 if you like.
It worked for me.

loserinamailbox
01-14-07, 05:33 PM
Yes, as others have said, repetition is the key, along with connecting the information to other pieces of memory in the brain. Show patterns, use colors, whatever he connect with. The more connections, the more likely he will understand and remember what it is he needs to remember, whether it be multiplication tables or vocabulary words.

~muddled~
01-15-07, 01:40 AM
thanks everyone for your suggestions

im a bit of an ADD'er myself so i know he is trying his best. i've never been fond of math but i did okay in grade school. i taught him and his older sister ways to make memorization easier and the sister picked it up, he however is struggling. i still hadn't found him a convenient trick.

peridot: as a 3rd grader, they are asked to do both now. the test he is taking is their quarterly exam so it's a one shot deal to do good. they are into numerical problems right now 5 digits X 2-3 digits ... like 34,976 x 95. he's good but really slow.

steviefranchise: he is asked to do it in school and i asked him to write one for me too. he does okay. just slow with the retrieval i guess.

sometimes, we both get frustrated. i bought a multiplication flash cards to ready him for recital class. he gets the smaller number really swift but with higher numbers he'd just tell me (as with reading) --- it's in my mind. frustrated i'd say to him -- okay, continue doing it that way. you might know it but your report card will have a zero grade on it. is that what you want? it gets to him sometimes, but i guess ADD'ers are wired differently. feeling imposed upon will never get anything done.

again, thanks for all your suggestions! pleasant day to all!

Imnapl
01-19-07, 11:56 PM
You'd be suprised... our second grade teacher wanted us to know it by heart (pure torture for me, although quite a few kids had it known x_x)

I agree with speedo; visuals are definitly a help. If you know it, the nines trick sometimes help, although I could never get it down.Sorry, I missed this thread in my subscriptions. I was asking for specific expectations for grade three curriculcum. I've just checked my provincial ministry of education and found that third graders are expected to add / subtract numbers to 1000 and multiply / divide numbers to 50. Skills are built on, not learned all at once.

mcovey
01-20-07, 11:03 PM
Learning how to multiply and then understanding why each number is in its place in the multiplication table would probably work better than simply memorizing the numbers, which is difficult without some clue as to why theyre there.

You can use tricks like all numbers that are multiples of 9 add up to 9. And anything times 11 would be easy... 10 not hard, 5 not hard, though I forget where I was in math in the 3rd grade.

Swede63
01-21-07, 12:16 AM
Flash cards work best for my son. It's just repetition, you can make up all the games you want but it's really just a matter of memorization.

We have triangular shaped flash cards. They are more fun to use. You cover up the answer and try and guess the factors and vise versa


Another study tool is to: read them to youself, write them down and read them outloud