View Full Version : OT for kids with sensory issues/stims


krisp
12-22-03, 11:45 AM
My 5-y.o. has a lot of sensory issues, and he does a lot of "stimming". He'll run in place, shaking his head rapidly, spin himself around, repetitively babble nonsense words and sounds, etc. Anyone had success with OT for problems like these? I've been trying to find alternate ways for him to get his stimulation, but lately his brother has been sick, he's gotten less excercise, and he's getting increasingly freaky. ;)

We're taking him to an OT after the first of the year to talk about all this, but I was hoping to get some feedback from people who have already BTDT.

speedo
09-28-05, 08:32 PM
Have you considered a puppy ?


Me :D

Jaycee
09-28-05, 10:22 PM
We use Ot therapy and Wilbarger brushing protocal that she set up and Yes, I see a difference in my child when he's been brushed. You need to make sure the OT you are going to has a sensory background. One who does mainly pediatrics will have some base knowledge. One who is Sensory Certified or CIPT certified definitely will. Make sure you child has acess to swings, Merry-go rounds, Sit and Spins and bean bags.

I'd also suggest Carol Kranowitz bool The Out-of Sync Child. It's easy to read and has suggestion for things you can do that don't need a lot of equipment. She also has a second book The Out-of=Sync Child Has Fun whichis devoted to sensory play activites that can help.

My sister is a specialist in this field and I resisted the therapy for my son until he got pretty severe. Now I wonder why I waited to do it. He now sleeps for 5 hrs uninterrupted and generally will go back to sleep within several minutes and sleep another 2-3 hrs. Caleb loves going to therapy because they do fun neat stuff. He's also learned how to calm himself down.
yes I'd advise you to go to an OT, but make sure you are dealing with someone who has a sensory background. If you're unsure...ask them.

Crazygirl79
09-29-05, 07:48 PM
Can you tell me what people with SID do when they stim or tic????

Jaycee
09-29-05, 09:35 PM
well it really depends on the child... it can be anything from pen tapping, leg bouncing and foot shaking when sitting (I see this a lot with my high school students) to repetative rocking, touching or rubbing things, running and jumping, turning in circles, to things that are associated more with Pervasive Developmental Delays like hand flapping, walking flat footed or tiptoe, or rocking back and forth.
Tics can be involuntary muscle twitches, double eye blinks, vocal tics (sounds like small groans and /or throat clearing) tapping, coughing..the list goes on and on and may be unique to a particular person.
My son has a full jaw tremble that comes out if he doesn't take meds.
Both tics and stims are the bodies way of coping with too much stress. The sounds/movements calm the nervous system.
Here is a link to a post here that gives a better example of what it looks like:
http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=21314

Crazygirl79
09-29-05, 11:13 PM
Thanks for that.....do these stims/tics actually annoy the SID sufferer like it does me?? and is Sensory Processing Disorder include the difficulty in processing information through the senses properly???

Crazygirl79
09-29-05, 11:16 PM
Would rocking from side to side to favourite songs and only to favourite songs be SID too??....when I do this it feels like I'm re-organising my ability to process information through my senses again.....I feel like a car thats constantly conking out due to lack of fuel...is that how SID would feel to someone...if so then I must have it.

Jaycee
09-30-05, 01:51 AM
You can have specific processing problems like auditory processing defitics that have their own lables, but yes...It's basically a problem sorting and filtering the information you get from the environment and your own body.
Rocking from side to side can be a calming stim even if you only do it occasionally. Basically if you do it to refocus or releave stress it may be a stim. However, don't get too freaked about that one...it sounds fairly appropriate socially. But knowing how to calm your system can be a huge help for your self control and stress levels.