View Full Version : Is this still prescribed?


netsavy006
01-27-07, 10:10 PM
Is Cylert still prescribed at all anymore? I don't plan to take it but I see very few topics on this med here...

nzkiwi
01-27-07, 10:14 PM
Not prescribed anymore due to cylert potential causing liver problems.

netsavy006
01-27-07, 10:25 PM
oh ok. I thought that was the case but I forgot. Thanks for the answer.

netsavy006
01-29-07, 08:50 AM
Though it does stand for reason, there are other medications that can cause serious liver problems like cylert and they are still on the market? What gives? any opinions as to why they stay and this one goes?...

TyPe-Zero
03-01-07, 07:04 PM
Cylert's original marketer, Abbott Labratories had stopped supporting it and quit formulating it.

Reason because it has been linked to hepatoxicity and although the medication works best for a handful of people compared to other medications, generally it is not profitable to make a drug that has been made obsolete by 'safer' drugs.

Although basically what most of what I said could be found under the wikipedia entry of Pemoline (the active ingredient in Cylert), from first hand experience I did NOT have a good time with pemoline.

Visual disturbances (mini-hallucinations)

Ugh! But i'm sure for others it works way better than anything else.

Bipolarruledout
09-09-07, 11:13 PM
It's very toxic compared to other drugs. The amphetamine class are some of the safest and well studied drugs on the market. Few people are not helped by an amphetamine or methlyphenidate based stimulant.... including dex which is lesser used but still popular. For others the non-stimulant treatments including stratera or off labels drugs may work. Dysoxyn is also said to be great but good luck getting it perscribed.

Bouncingoffwall
11-23-11, 08:32 PM
Maybe an organic chemist will come along and slightly alter that pemoline molecule to make it safer while retaining its efficacy?

Unfortunately, I have no such skills in organic chemistry and no resources to do research. Any takers? :p

bradd
04-01-12, 01:33 PM
Cylert (pemoline) was dropped from the market because a certain well established "consumer-safety" activist group, armed with lawyers, professional lobbyists, media savvy movers and shakers, etc. woke up one morning to determine (in their view) that pemoline is an "evil" drug. ** They believed this to be the case because over the years some patients had experienced liver toxicity in association with taking it; a few of these resulting in death due to liver failure. Just to put this into perspective however, the OTC drug Tylenol (acetaminophen) can be associated with many-times-over the incidence of liver injury and death than pemoline ever had been. However, taking on Tylenol would be not be the weakest of pickings for such a group. Cylert, on the other hand, was an infrequently prescribed treatment for AD/HD, generally not as effective a medication as other stimulants [though there were individual exceptions], not a big money maker for it's manufacturer, had been around long enough for the infrequent negative physician reports to have accumulated somewhat, all making targeting pemoline for elimination a convenientwork project.


** See it's really very simple. In medicine there are two kinds of drugs: 1) perfect drugs and 2) evil drugs. Perfect drugs never have serious side effects, no matter how many thousands or millions of people may have exposed themselves to them. Evil drugs on the other hand, are evil because they can have serious side effects, even if only rarely. By this definition of course, all drugs -except fictional ones - are evil. But the consumer group behind the scrutiny selectively applied to pemoline was not about to attack all drugs at once. That's just not how they go about changing the world, for the better; "a better world" meaning "one that fits our preconceptions of how all things in life ought to be dealt with, or perhaps rather, <!--><xml> <w:WordDocument> <w:View>Normal</w:View> <w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom> <w:Compatibility> <w:BreakWrappedTables/> <w:SnapToGridInCell/> <w:WrapTextWithPunct/> <w:UseAsianBreakRules/> </w:Compatibility> <w:BrowserLevel>MicrosoftInternetExplorer4</w:BrowserLevel> </w:WordDocument> </xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 10]> <style> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman";} </style> <![endif]--> [I]notdealt with - as in better to leave neuro-atypicals the way they are than to interfere with nature..."





Cylert's original marketer, Abbott Labratories had stopped supporting it and quit formulating it.

Reason because it has been linked to hepatoxicity and although the medication works best for a handful of people compared to other medications, generally it is not profitable to make a drug that has been made obsolete by 'safer' drugs.

Although basically what most of what I said could be found under the wikipedia entry of Pemoline (the active ingredient in Cylert), from first hand experience I did NOT have a good time with pemoline.

Visual disturbances (mini-hallucinations)

Ugh! But i'm sure for others it works way better than anything else.

PriscillaR
08-26-12, 11:56 AM
Any drug can/will affect the liver. The only problem(?) I could ever see was that it was prescribed to children. Children get sick and 'good' moms try to help by giving combinations of acetaminophen (pills, cough syrup etc.)
Pemoline was an innocent victim. The real problem is acetaminophen not being used properly.