View Full Version : "Everybody has those problems!"


Buttercup
02-13-07, 02:10 PM
Just a few moments ago I was speaking with a coworker. She knows of my ADD & my struggles of getting it treated. She has made comments about not knowing what it was, so I brought in "Delivered from Distraction" & asked her to read the self assessment quiz to understand what I go through on a daily basis.

She read it for about 30 seconds & gave it back telling me that she didn't need to read anymore, that everyone she knows experiences those things. It is LIFE. Those Drs will tell you that you have anything & everything, she says.

I tried to tell her that "those things" were chronic & debilitating & that I have experienced the fall out since childhood.

She said that EVERYONE goes through that!! Her parents told her that she was stupid too. (My teachers & classmates told me that I was stupid. My parents NEVER did.)

I've just recently been diagnosed & have been on the verge of crying for a few days now. She pushed me over the edge!!!

I can't take this anymore. Between my job being in jeopardy, my wonderful mother thinking that she is responsible, my Dr not wanting to give me other treatment options than Wellbutrin & now coworkers denying the existance of ADD at all, I've about had it! I want to curl up & die.

I don't want to wallow in my disfunction world anymore.

Waaaa! ***** ***** *****

bc

jeaniebug
02-13-07, 05:46 PM
Just a few moments ago I was speaking with a coworker. She knows of my ADD & my struggles of getting it treated. She has made comments about not knowing what it was, so I brought in "Delivered from Distraction" & asked her to read the self assessment quiz to understand what I go through on a daily basis.

She read it for about 30 seconds & gave it back telling me that she didn't need to read anymore, that everyone she knows experiences those things. It is LIFE. Those Drs will tell you that you have anything & everything, she says.

I tried to tell her that "those things" were chronic & debilitating & that I have experienced the fall out since childhood.

She said that EVERYONE goes through that!! Her parents told her that she was stupid too. (My teachers & classmates told me that I was stupid. My parents NEVER did.)

I've just recently been diagnosed & have been on the verge of crying for a few days now. She pushed me over the edge!!!

I can't take this anymore. Between my job being in jeopardy, my wonderful mother thinking that she is responsible, my Dr not wanting to give me other treatment options than Wellbutrin & now coworkers denying the existance of ADD at all, I've about had it! I want to curl up & die.
Buttercup,

It is true, everyone does have these problems. However, the degree of impairment, and more importantly, how much it affects your ability to function in a variety of environments -- school, home, work, parenting etc. is what makes it a disability.

People do not understand very much about ADHD. And you can't expect them to. I didn't understand the first thing about it until I joined this forum and spend many hours daily for several months looking for answers.

I don't share the diagnosis, because people just don't know much about it. They have no reason to until they are dealing with problems of their own or their kids, or work with kids who have it. (That's how I got here, I work with hyperactive ADHD boys). Only then did I even discover that there was an inattentive type that remains largely undiagnosed especially in woman. Which I have and has been undiagnosed for 52 years in spite of a search for answers from more than a dozen therapists, doctors and psychiatrists. Even the medical professional doesn't really know much about it.

So come here and learn, rant and read. But don't try to convince people who really aren't interested in knowledge or who feel they "know" what ADHD is about.

Give yourself a break sweetie! Give your Mom a hug and leave your coworkers out of it.

I've been sharing this link a lot lately, watch Dr. Thomas Brown describe ADHD in these short videos:

http://www.drthomasebrown.com/resources/index.html (http://www.drthomasebrown.com/resources/index.html)

I also found an old post from Nova yesterday that I liked: "What It's like to have ADD" by Hallowell (who wrote Driven to Distraction and Delivered from Distraction)

Oops, don't have the link, I only copied the article, shoot. I'll try to put in another post, because it's kind of long. BTW, thanks Nova

Remember to breathe. Cry as much as you need to. Go through the stages of grief. All that is OK and normal. Here's a few pats on the back from me and a BIG HUG.

;) :D :o :( :) :eek:

jeaniebug
02-13-07, 05:53 PM
I loved this!

What's It Like To Have Add?

By Edward M. Hallowell, M.D.


What is it like to have ADD? What is the feel of the syndrome?

I have a short talk that I often give to groups as an introduction to the subjective experience of ADD and what it is like to live with it:

Attention Deficit Disorder. First of all I resent the term. As far as I'm concerned most people have Attention Surplus Disorder. I mean, life being what it is, who can pay attention to anything for very long?

Is it really a sign of mental health to be able to balance your checkbook, sit still in your chair, and never speak out of turn? As far as I can see, many people who don't have ADD are charter members of the Congenitally Boring.

But anyway, be that as it may, there is this syndrome called ADD or ADHD, depending on what book you read. So what's it like to have ADD? Some people say the so-called syndrome doesn't even exist, but believe me, it does.

Many metaphors come to mind to describe it. It's like driving in the rain with bad windshield wipers. Everything is smudged and blurred and you're speeding along, and it's reeeeally frustrating not being able to see very well.

Or it's like listening to a radio station with a lot of static and you have to strain to hear what's going on. Or, it's like trying to build a house of cards in a dust storm. You have to build a structure to protect yourself from the wind before you can even start on the cards.

In other ways it's like being super-charged all the time. You get one idea and you have to act on it, and then, what do you know, but you've got another idea before you've finished up with the first one, and so you go for that one, but of course a third idea intercepts the second, and you just have to follow that one, and pretty soon people are calling you disorganized and impulsive and all sorts of impolite words that miss the point completely. Because you're trying really hard.

It's just that you have all these invisible vectors pulling you this way and that which makes it really hard to stay on task.

Plus which, you're spilling over all the time. You're drumming your fingers, tapping your feet, humming a song, whistling, looking here, looking there, scratching, stretching, doodling, and people think you're not paying attention or that you're not interested, but all you're doing is spilling over so that you can pay attention.

I can pay a lot better attention when I'm taking a walk or listening to music or even when I'm in a crowded, noisy room than when I'm still and surrounded by silence. God save me from the reading rooms. Have you ever been into the one in Widener Library? The only thing that saves it is that so many of the people who use it have ADD that there's a constant soothing bustle.

What is it like to have ADD? Buzzing. Being here and there and everywhere.

Someone once said, "Time is the thing that keeps everything from happening all at once." Time parcels moments out into separate bits so that we can do one thing at a time. In ADD, this does not happen. In ADD, time collapses. Time becomes a black hole.

To the person with ADD it feels as if everything is happening all at once. This creates a sense of inner turmoil or even panic. The individual loses perspective and the ability to prioritize. He or she is always on the go, trying to keep the world from caving in on top.

Museums. (Have you noticed how I skip around? That's part of the deal. I change channels a lot. And radio stations. Drives my wife nuts. "Can't we listen to just one song all the way through?")

Anyway, museums. The way I go through a museum is the way some people go through Filene's basement. Some of this, some of that, oh, this one looks nice, but what about that rack over there? Gotta hurry, gotta run.

It's not that I don't like art. I love art. But my way of loving it makes most people think I'm a real Philistine. On the other hand, sometimes I can sit and look at one painting for a long while. I'll get into the world of the painting and buzz around in there until I forget about everything else.

In these moments I, like most people with ADD, can hyperfocus, which gives the lie to the notion that we can never pay attention. Sometimes we have turbocharged focusing abilities. It just depends upon the situation.

Lines. I'm almost incapable of waiting in lines. I just can't wait, you see. That's the hell of it. Impulse leads to action. I'm very short on what you might call the intermediate reflective step between impulse and action.

That's why I, like so many people with ADD, lack tact. Tact is entirely dependent on the ability to consider one's words before uttering them. We ADD types don't do this so well. I remember in the fifth grade I noticed my math teacher's hair in a new style and blurted out, "Mr. Cook, is that a toupe you're wearing?" I got kicked out of class.

I've since learned how to say these inappropriate things in such a way or at such a time that they can in fact be helpful. But it has taken time. That's the thing about ADD. It takes a lot of adapting to get on in life. But it certainly can be done, and be done very well.

As you might imagine, intimacy can be a problem if you've got to be constantly changing the subject, pacing, scratching and blurting out tactless remarks. My wife has learned not to take my tuning out personally, and she says that when I'm there, I'm really there.

At first, when we met, she thought I was some kind of nut, as I would bolt out of restaurants at the end of meals or disappear to another planet during a conversation. Now she has grown accustomed to my sudden coming and goings.

Many of us with ADD crave high-stimulus situations. In my case, I love the racetrack. And I love the high-intensity crucible of doing psychotherapy. And I love having lots of people around. Obviously this tendency can get you into trouble, which is why ADD is high among criminals and self-destructive risk-takers.

It is also high among so-called Type A personalities, as well as among manic-depressives, sociopaths and criminals, violent people, drug abusers, and alcoholics. But is is also high among creative and intuitive people in all fields, and among highly energetic, highly productive people.

Which is to say there is a positive side to all this. Usually the positive doesn't get mentioned when people speak about ADD because there is a natural tendency to focus on what goes wrong, or at least on what has to be somehow controlled.

But often once the ADD has been diagnosed, and the child or the adult, with the help of teachers and parents or spouses, friends, and colleagues, has learned how to cope with it, an untapped realm of the brain swims into view.

Suddenly the radio station is tuned in, the windshield is clear, the sand storm has died down. And the child or adult, who had been such a problem, such a nudge, such a general pain in the neck to himself and everybody else, that person starts doing things he'd never been able to do before.

He surprises everyone around him, and he surprises himself. I use the male pronoun, but it could just as easily be she, as we are seeing more and more ADD among females as we are looking for it.

Often these people are highly imaginative and intuitive. They have a "feel" for things, a way of seeing right into the heart of matters while others have to reason their way along methodically.

This is the person who can't explain how he thought of the solution, or where the idea for the story came from, or why suddenly he produced such a painting, or how he knew the short cut to the answer, but all he can say is he just knew it, he could feel it. This is the man or woman who makes million dollar deals in a catnap and pulls them off the next day.

This is the child who, having been reprimanded for blurting something out, is then praised for having blurted out something brilliant. These are the people who learn and know and do and go by touch and feel.

These people can feel a lot. In places where most of us are blind, they can, if not see the light, at least feel the light, and they can produce answers apparently out of the dark.

It is important for others to be sensitive to this "sixth sense" many ADD people have, and to nurture it.

If the environment insists on rational, linear thinking and "good" behavior from these people all the time, then they may never develop their intuitive style to the point where they can use it profitably.

It can be exasperating to listen to people talk. They can sound so vague or rambling.

But if you take them seriously and grope along with them, often you will find they are on the brink of startling conclusions or surprising solutions.

What I am saying is that their cognitive style is qualitatively different from most people's, and what may seem impaired, with patience and encouragement may become gifted.

The thing to remember is that if the diagnosis can be made, then most of the bad stuff associated with ADD can be avoided or contained. The diagnosis can be liberating, particularly for people who have been stuck with labels like, "lazy", "stubborn", "willful", "disruptive", "impossible", "tyrannical", "a spaceshot", "brain damaged", "stupid", or just plain "bad".

Making the diagnosis of ADD can take the case from the court of moral judgment to the clinic of neuropsychiatric treatment.

What is the treatment all about? Anything that turns down the noise.

Just making the diagnosis helps turn down the noise of guilt and self-recrimination.

Building certain kinds of structure into one's life can help a lot.

Working in small spurts rather than long hauls.

Breaking tasks down into smaller tasks.

Making lists.

Getting help where you need it, whether it's having a secretary, or an accountant, or an automatic bank teller, or a good filing system, or a home computer, getting help where you need it.

Maybe applying external limits on your impulses.

Or getting enough exercise to work off some of the noise inside.

Finding support.

Getting someone in your corner to coach you, to keep you on track.

Medication can help a great deal too, but it is far from the whole solution.

The good news is that treatment can really help.

Let me leave you by telling you that we need your help and understanding. We may make mess-piles wherever we go, but with your help, those mess-piles can be turned into realms of reason and art.

So, if you know someone like me who's acting up and daydreaming and forgetting this or that and just not getting with the program, consider ADD before he starts believing all the bad things people are saying about him and it's too late.

The main point of the talk is that there is a more complex subjective experience to ADD than a list of symptoms can possibly impart. ADD is a way of life, and until recently it has been hidden, even from the view of those who have it.

The human experience of ADD is more than just a collection of symptoms. It is a way of living. Before the syndrome is diagnosed that way of living may be filled with pain and misunderstanding. After the diagnosis is made, one often finds new possibilities and the chance for real change.

The adult syndrome of ADD, so long unrecognized, is now at last bursting upon the scene.

Thankfully, millions of adults who have had to think of themselves as defective or unable to get their acts together, will instead be able to make the most of their considerable abilities. It is a hopeful time indeed.

Buttercup
02-13-07, 05:54 PM
Your respomse was so soft & comforting. It felt like hug.

Thank you. It helps.

bc

jeaniebug
02-13-07, 05:57 PM
Your respomse was so soft & comforting. It felt like hug.

Thank you. It helps.

bc
Thanks, BC

Better the fear that you know, and all that. You can have a bright future, although it takes a while to get used the diagnosis and get the meds figured out. You have friends here, and having a great Mom is huge help. :D

~boots~
02-13-07, 11:44 PM
hugs BC xxx

Tyboulder
02-25-07, 07:31 PM
Yeah, take a bit to relax and distance yourself from that coworker and his/her attitude. I think that if your doctor isn't willing to give you all the treatment options (including stimulant medication) then you need a new doctor. It took me almost a year (longer than average) to find a medication that worked for me. I went through 7 kinds of short and long acting Ritalin and Adderall before settling on a short and long acting form of dexadrine. If Ritalin were my only option, I wouldn't take it. It just goes to show you that yo uneed someone to understand your diagnosis and work with you. I might never had found out that I have inattentive ADD had I not taken a friend's adderall and felt my brain suddenly able to work in a way that was never before possible. I would not be where I am today, nor function at what I'm doing if it wasn't for patience (with yourself and with others), education, and medication. I don't share with anyone that I have ADD because I expect them to react similar to how I did prior to my own diagnosis. Unless they have tangible experience with the syndrome and unless you completely trust the person, I would only expect negative outcomes from letting anyone know. Also, you need to be okay with letting the naysayers be (or other negative people you come across). Don't feel like you need to convince ANYONE that you have ADD, and don't associate with (if possible) those who question your ability, potential, or positive attitude. My two cents...

justhope
02-25-07, 09:10 PM
Perhaps your co-worker has it too, and is in denial?

Who knows, but I can tell you what. Let no one keep you down from finding what works for you. If you doctor is not listening to you, find another one.

If you mom is having issues dealing with it, tell her you love her and you would like her support more than anything. If she needs support help her find a support group for parents of kids yes even grown with ADD....then she can see it's not cause by her, unless she has it too>>> then oh well.

And most of alll please continue to surround yourself wiht people who understand you and support you. Don't try to make your point or defend yourself to people who dont want to understand you, and probably never will. If you don't need special accomadations at work for your ADD then don't bring it up. Unless your boss or coworkers are ADD themselves, or have someone they love who is , they won't understand. Don't waste your time or emotions defending it.

Instead surround yourself with people who do. And get healthy. Once you do those things, the destruction and bad habits of having a chemical imbalance your entire life,,,,will become more managable, and you can take steps to be more successful. It's not an easy road. But you can do it.

Make sure to check out the advocate/ support portion of the forum,and look into getting a peer coach or buddy who can help you.

Good luck...and please stay in touch with us. Many of us have been there and come out on the other side. Myself being one of them.

lunaslobo
03-05-07, 09:41 PM
that everyone she knows experiences those things. It is LIFE. Those Drs will tell you that you have anything & everything, she says.
I have heard this type of thing from so many people. they are the same ones that say people dont need dr.s or meds to get by or to get better, we just need to teach them to lift themselves up by their own bootstraps. that people need to be able to do things on their own. well some times people dont have the boot straps, or the ability to just over come. thats when we need the little extra help. it takes courage to face the things you are facing. Im glad to have you here and sharing with us. gives me streangth to read and know that i am not alone. thank you for that and good luck.

Miriam
03-07-07, 06:34 AM
Perhaps your co-worker has it too, and is in denial?


You may be onto something, Justhope. In my experience, there is no one more hostile to ADD than someone who is in denial. The first person I told I thought I had ADD-- my doctor!!! -- was one of these I'm sure of it. Everything I told her about having to work extra hours to keep up, struggling to be on time, losing things, she had a story to top it. She had been through all of these things and thought I had nothing to whine about. All the while she claimed I could not have ADD, because only people who have failed out of school or gotten fired from their jobs really have ADD. Whoah.

By the end of the appointment I had gotten out of her that she had to apply to medical school multiple times to get accepted. She had failed Chemistry once and made below a 3.0 in her undergrad (amazing considering most people have to get above a 3.7 to get into med school.) She told me anyone can get into med school if they apply enough. Honestly this did not make me feel good about being in her care. I liked her even less when she tried to scare me about how dangerous ADD drug side effects are and how I might lose my job if I decided to take them. By this point I almost felt sorry for her and her ignorance (I did a ton of research and the stuff she was saying didn't really even sound true-- I wonder if she failed that class in med school too). By the time she took out her referral pad and finally broke down to allow me to see a psychiatrist, I was almost laughing and wanted to offer to take her with me!

Anyway, Buttercup, my point is don't let your coworker get you down. Lots of people try to tell you they know how it is, and they don't. Some of them may be worse off than you.

And as for your doctor, I hope you've made some progress on that front. How's it going with the med options? See another one if you want to and can under your health plan. If not, do your research, go in there and lay it all out. If you have done the research and stick to your guns, most docs will give you exactly what you want. They don't have time to argue with patients because they are usually under pressure to see the most patients possible each day. (My psychiatrist writes on all my prescriptions that I can't have stimulants so that I can have my health plan order me Strattera without giving me a hassle about it. I've never tried stims, but I wanted to go non-stim first and once I laid out all my reasons he agreed.) Good luck and keep us posted!

bekahboo714
03-09-07, 05:49 PM
I also have OCD and so many people have said to me when I'm describing my symptoms, "Well everyone does that!" or "I do that too but I don't have OCD!" The key when describing ADD and OCD is what the last letter--D--stands for: DISORDER! Everyone can be Obsessive-compulsive to a point. Everyone has a bit of Attention Deficiency or hyperactivity/lack of focus. But when these symptoms are so severe that they prevent an individual from functioning normally on a daily basis that is when it become a disorder and one can more than likely then be diagnosed has having ADD, OCD, BiPolar Disorder, Body Dysmorphic Disorder, etc.

noodlzzz
02-22-09, 04:12 PM
What I find with ADD descriptions is that it does not display the severity of the symptoms. Sure everyone can get easily distracted SOMETIMES, sure most can be A BIT restless and many daydream, but can also STOP themselves.
I would love anyone who thinks that its a fact of life to try living like we do, with the opposites of those caps

I hope you understand what Im saying, kinda hard to explain but Im really sorry that she said that, it's not her place at all to tell you your not suffering.

stef
02-22-09, 05:51 PM
Denial - that's interesting!
i told a family friend about ADD this summer and I got one of those "well everyone does that!" when I was sure she would really understand. I'm thinking, she may actually have this herself.
my mom felt bad too when I told her...
anyway as you can see from the great replies people have already sent you're not alone here!

Michiko74
02-24-09, 11:22 PM
What's that saying.. you can lead a horse to water, but you can't make it drink? :p Not everyone is ready or willing to be educated about ADHD. And there could be a half a dozen reasons why she and so many others are willing to dismiss ADHD. Although you didn't get a good response, I still encourage you to keep trying to educate those around you. But be prepared for a not so great reception.

You know what ADHD is. ADHD doesn't become more 'real' just because those around you are willing to accept it. Sometimes you take your symptoms and continue on anyway.

There's a lot going around you, but the bottom line is that you're not being treated for your ADHD. And of course, trying to manage ADHD on your own is virtually impossible. So stop trying to get support in people who aren't willing or ready to help you.

It's a dark period in your life right now, but I do offer a better and more positive picture ahead. Don't give up now.

wsmac
02-25-09, 12:22 AM
Well, I'm not sure if you're still reading this Buttercup, but I do hope you are feeling better.

There seems no end to the long line of people who want to tell us that we do not have such a thing as ADD/HD.

I have heard that many, many, times... and I doubt I will ever hear the last of it.

I work at a hospital and even some of my co-workers tell me there's no such thing as ADD/HD. I had one nurse I know tell me that, and then go on to tell me I was just manic!:rolleyes:

I still like her, but I don't like the fact that she won't try to understand how different my brain is wired from hers.

Even my own wife (recently former wife), a pediatrician!, couldn't understand why I had such a hard time with things.
"I just don't see why you can't get up in the morning, go to the table and write down what you need to do that day, then follow your list!"

Granted... it's a bit harder to accept when something like this hits close to, or directly on top of, home.;)

Sorry to hear about your job. After 40 jobs, I finally hit upon one where I am tolerated. Job number 41... probably not my last one in life, but the best one so far!

I hope you find that job for you someday!:D

casper
02-26-09, 11:10 PM
Some people just don't understand how ADD affects us, there is not much u can do about it.

crazycat1990
04-23-09, 07:22 AM
Grr! I got this treatment recently!
Haven't actually been DX'd with ADHD yet but I have Asperger's. I started a new job in March and really found coping with the change difficult, and getting on with the different people. I had friends in the other areas so I spoke to my TL about my AS and how it affects me, and if I could move areas. All the time this is going on he keeps saying to me "it's the same for everyone when they are new" and "I was like it when I started working here, you'll make some really great friends." I didn't answer back but I was just thinking "WHAT?! You have NO idea what it's like having AS, and neither does anyone else who doesn't have it!! It is NOT the same for everyone, cos for me it is 1000 times harder and a completely different scenario! Plus I will not make friends, not unless you hurry up and move me to a nicer area with people I already know!" And yeah they couldn't do it, it was a "bad time"for them apparently. So I left :D Going back to my old job which I have done for two years in a few weeks, can't wait!!!

Ruby85
04-25-09, 12:55 PM
There was a great video clip (only about 15 seconds) that we saw in a training session at my last job, but I can't find it online. It showed a page with text, about 4 or 5 paragraphs. It was a passage that middle-school students were supposed to read as part of a reading comprehension test. But every two seconds, the page would fade out and be replaced by a photo of a dog, and then a photo of a swing set in a backyard, and then a photo of a group of kids riding bikes, etc. Between these random images, the text would reappear briefly, but it would disappear too fast to read it.

Then the woman giving the presentation said, "OK, now answer these ten questions about the passage you just read." Of course no one could answer anything, because all those images kept getting in the way! She was like "That's what it's like for a child with ADD." I thought that was a great way of showing it, because it shows how frustrating it is when you're trying to concentrate on something, and you can't control the things that are distracting you.

carissa_lee
04-29-09, 07:48 PM
The article, "What's it like to have ADD?", is awesome. Even though it was posted like 2 years ago lol. It was a good read.

DrZoidberg
07-12-11, 05:05 AM
Everybody who reads in depth about any mental affliction or disability inevitably thinks they have it.

The truth is that everybody has a little bit of everything. What sets people with ADHD apart is that we've got more of whatever it is that defines ADHD. But everybody struggles with the same things ADHD sufferers struggle with. That much your co-worker got right.

Here's something good to keep in mind. You can't imagine how it is to live in your co-workers head. And she can't imagine living in your's. You're both prisoners of your own brain and your own perspective. You don't know what she struggles with emotionally or mentally and you can't. And she doesn't know what you're going through and she can't.

adhdwptsd
07-12-11, 06:47 AM
I deleted this post as i hit send by error

mirandatoritess
10-30-12, 10:51 PM
Buttercup,

It is true, everyone does have these problems. However, the degree of impairment, and more importantly, how much it affects your ability to function in a variety of environments -- school, home, work, parenting etc. is what makes it a disability.

People do not understand very much about ADHD. And you can't expect them to. I didn't understand the first thing about it until I joined this forum and spend many hours daily for several months looking for answers.

I don't share the diagnosis, because people just don't know much about it. They have no reason to until they are dealing with problems of their own or their kids, or work with kids who have it. (That's how I got here, I work with hyperactive ADHD boys). Only then did I even discover that there was an inattentive type that remains largely undiagnosed especially in woman. Which I have and has been undiagnosed for 52 years in spite of a search for answers from more than a dozen therapists, doctors and psychiatrists. Even the medical professional doesn't really know much about it.

So come here and learn, rant and read. But don't try to convince people who really aren't interested in knowledge or who feel they "know" what ADHD is about.

Give yourself a break sweetie! Give your Mom a hug and leave your coworkers out of it.

I've been sharing this link a lot lately, watch Dr. Thomas Brown describe ADHD in these short videos:

http://www.drthomasebrown.com/resources/index.html (http://www.drthomasebrown.com/resources/index.html)

I also found an old post from Nova yesterday that I liked: "What It's like to have ADD" by Hallowell (who wrote Driven to Distraction and Delivered from Distraction)

Oops, don't have the link, I only copied the article, shoot. I'll try to put in another post, because it's kind of long. BTW, thanks Nova

Remember to breathe. Cry as much as you need to. Go through the stages of grief. All that is OK and normal. Here's a few pats on the back from me and a BIG HUG.

;) :D :o :( :) :eek:
Buttercup,
same as the person previously stated, difference between NTs and us is that the symptoms are debilitating in our case whereas in their case, the symptoms are present occassionaly. That is why the ADHD assessment scales are graded in a 0-4 scale. DEGREE OF SYMPTOMS is the determiner of a disability.

Plognark
11-01-12, 09:47 AM
Ah, I love that quoted section from Dr. hallowell. That was my resonating moment when I finally realized that my shrink had hit the nail square on the head when she said I may have ADHD.