View Full Version : Leg thumping/Standing on Knees in chair( I don't get it)


Proud2BAteacher
03-16-07, 06:27 PM
Why do adhd students thump their legs while in their seat? Is it calming to them?

Why do they stand up on their knees? Some of my collegues said it's easier for them to concentrate like that?

Tiako44
03-16-07, 06:39 PM
It is a tick....

meadd823
03-16-07, 07:05 PM
In my opinio they are using these activities as secondary sensory stimulation

“Fidget to Focus”
By Roland Rotz PhD and Sarah D. Wright W.S.,A.C.T.

Page 38-39




When we fidget in order to focus, the fidgeting results in the short-term modulation of our deregulated neurological system . This is, at least, What we think is going on knowing what we do Is about neurology. The deregulation happens when there is not enough stimulation for the feed back loops in our brains to sustain adequate biochemical activity. When we are underarounsed the sense we are predominantly using is operating ineffectively in that moment . For instance of our minds are not able to sustain focus during a lecture, happens because our auditory processing is failing to keep us sufficiently stimulated, despite the level of importance of the event. In simpler terms the activity may be interesting just not interesting enough to keep our attention.


In simplest terms an effective fidget is a secondary sensory-motor activity we engage in to support the first.
***End Quote

Like right now I am calling hotels and posting it is all about stimuli stimuli keeps the brain awake and engaged.

Hope this helps.

Tara
03-16-07, 07:24 PM
I highly reccomend the book "Fidget to Focus" by Sarah Wright and Roland Rotz. It should be required reading for all teachers!

Proud2BAteacher
03-16-07, 07:41 PM
Okay, thanks so much for your replies!!!

ADDitives
03-18-07, 04:04 AM
I find this very interesting. Two years ago I was bringing paperclips to my lectures to fiddle with so that I could focus better.

Now sometimes I look at something different in the room, to listen better. Strange, isn't it,b ecause looking at something else WOULD be seen as a sign that I'm NOT listening, and that I'm thinking more about the thing I'm looking at. But is that the case? Well... I really don't know. I do many things for many reasons.

Remember that kids do odd things, and ADD kids do things which are more odd. They are probably just doing anything they can, without it being an active strategy that they could explain to you, to help change their body position or activity becuase it just doesn't feel right and isn't conducive to the activity (e.g. listening, writing, whatever). Novel stimuli (such as sitting higher than usual by kneeling on their chair) can provide clarity, just for a while, because there's something different going on, and it might be easier then to weed out what's important and what's not (because the "background" information has changed, but the activity such as listening to the teacher has remained constant).

Does this make sense? Anyone have comments about what I have said - do you agree or think I'm just pulling this out of thin air? I'm just commenting on my own experience, and speculations, anyway.

ADDitives
03-18-07, 04:05 AM
Oh by the way - try not to ask so much "why do adhd kids do this" as

"why do THESE kids do this?"

FrazzleDazzle
03-18-07, 10:18 AM
The standing up on the knees in the seat, as well as other odd postions when sitting, can be a symtom of a retained reflex, the STNR. My son and I both recently completed a therapy for this, and he sits more "normally," comfortabley, and with much less fidgeting. He used used to sprawl himself all over the couch or bed while studying, just because sitting in a chair for a long time was too uncomfortable. He is not diagnosed with the hyperactivity part either, he just was not comfortable. I have been able to sit still for longer as well. I used to have to sit on one of my legs under me, or wrap my legs around the chair legs, either slouch or sit forward with with my head and arms straight out on the desk, and always having a foot swinging or tapping to some beat. Some children with this retained reflex have been seen sitting in their seats, while writing on the floor! These are all symtoms of this retained reflex. I am happy to say, that amongst other results, after doing the therapy, these are no longer an issue for DS or I. I have corresponded with another teacher through another forum, who has done the therapy herself, and can also now recognize the students who may also have this retained reflex, and allows those students to stand at a counter, or to have some sort of seating accomodations. It seems very unfair to make these students "sit up straight" so they can concentrate and focus, because that just makes them more miserable. The book the therpay comes from is called "Stopping ADHD" and more information can be found on their website by doing a search for STNR and the name of the book. YOu will likely see profound list of odd seating positions listed there, and it may begin to make sense what you are seeing. There are many studies and research regarding retained reflexes and learning and their impact on education.

Imnapl
03-18-07, 01:34 PM
Why do adhd students thump their legs while in their seat? Is it calming to them?

Why do they stand up on their knees? Some of my collegues said it's easier for them to concentrate like that?This is common behaviour for other kids who don't have ADHD, especially little boys. Re: how to control ADHD kids in the classroom? A well structured classroom, consistent expectations and consequences are good for all students. Nip things in the bud, so to speak.

pedalpounder
03-18-07, 02:19 PM
I am fidgetting as I am reading this thread. I only just noticed. I must not be very interested in it ;)

Imnapl
03-18-07, 02:30 PM
I am fidgetting as I am reading this thread. I only just noticed. I must not be very interested in it ;)Thanks for my first big laugh of the day. :D

IansDad
05-10-07, 01:25 AM
Thanks for all the technical info, guys. I think I understand most of it and it sure makes sense.

All I know is that I have done (and still do) both of these, as well as "drumming" with my hands or a pencil. I have never understood why I do them, other than the fact that if I have to sit still for more than a few seconds, I involuntarily begin to fidget. I don't know if it helped me concentrate, as suggested above, on the intended focus of the room (teacher in this case) because I seem to remember being torn from many a lovely daydream by folks ordering me to stop in an exasperated tone.

I do need to say that I resent the "nip it in the bud" language used above. I'll leave it at that. If Imnapl wishes to hear why I reacted this way, please PM me.

I did not return to ADDF to rant. But I seem to have an urge to do so anyway. Sorry about that. It's an issue I'm working on diligently about myself.

Imnapl
05-10-07, 01:35 AM
I do need to say that I resent the "nip it in the bud" language used above.If you took offence to this statement, perhaps an explanation would help. When I say "nip it in the bud", I am referring to classroom control. Different people have a different definition of chaos. Some teachers don't see a problem with a lot of noise or fooling around, but it can be very difficult for some students to stay focussed and on task when others are talking, wandering around the room, etc.

IansDad, what did you think I meant?

acceptance
05-10-07, 07:52 AM
Why do adhd students thump their legs while in their seat? Is it calming to them?

Why do they stand up on their knees? Some of my collegues said it's easier for them to concentrate like that?:eek: its what we do to focus,part of our body runs wild with our concentration levels...swaying,flicking our fingers,scratching,twirling anything in our hands,commonly with me is eyes unfocused(my quack pulls me up on this..also legs crossed and kicking out)..oh well,hope it all makes sense to you.:foot:

QueensU_girl
05-10-07, 08:31 AM
This "thump their legs" thing is not universal. (Probably just the Hyperactives. (The minority of ADHDers.)

Many ADHDers are never diagnosed in school. (So we wind up here after self-diagnosing, or after being diagnosed as Adults.)

------------

One theory:

ADHD is an alertness/arousal disorder. The underactive ARAS (nervous system's Ascending Reticular Activating System) is less active, so an ADHD/ADDer must do things, externally, to keep themselves alert/awake/focused.

People with CFS (chronic fatigue syndrome) also show problems in their Reticular (arousal/alertness) brain systems.

Hyperactivity can also be a sign of an irritated/irritable nervous system (stress, toxin, developmental insults, etc).

In fact, in Neuroscience, one of the ways we kill neurons (nerve cells) is to use something that stimulates a cell to death. Pesticides work this way with insects too. An overstimulated cell or organism, if the stimulation goes high enough, long enough, will collapse.

Anyway -- to make a long story short -- the hyperactivity likely helps recruit more senses/motor areas, which helps the person's brain focus. (Similarly to how some ADHD kids will calm down and focus when placed in front of a Video Game. All their SENSES are recruited, and their brain can cope better that way.)

QueensU_girl
05-10-07, 08:39 AM
No idea what you mean about 'standing on knees'.

Never seen that. (And I've babysat or been in school over the years with about 6-8 leg-shakin' ADHD kids.)

NB. Hyperactivity can occur alone, and isn't necessarily "ADHD". (Some of the worst affected ADHD kids don't have Hyperactivity in class, either. We had Working Memory deficits; Auditory Processing isues; Executive Dysfunction, etc.)

A variety of Stressors can cause "hyperactivity" in a child. (Acute incidents like being in a car accident; ongoing stressors in the home; seeing an upset parent's emotional upset & facial reactions [affective responses] stresses a kid; living in cigarette smoke; malnutrition (anemia); toxins like lead/mercury) can make kids 'hyperactive" or "behavioural".
Kids don't have words for their stress or for describing what has happened to them in the past (play therapy can help) -- so they only way they have of showing their Stress is via behavioral manifestations (violence; irritability; school avoidance; tears; withdrawal) or via symptoms (stomachaches; headaches; learning problems).

Tara
05-10-07, 10:52 AM
I think the standing on their knees aka kneeling is a good sign. It's a sign that the child is interested in what's going on and it trying to pay attention.

routhy
05-10-07, 06:58 PM
Oh by the way - try not to ask so much "why do adhd kids do this" as

"why do THESE kids do this?" You make it seem like ADHD is a taboo word, or something that should be 'swept under the rug', which is not the case.

Paws13
05-10-07, 09:22 PM
I usually thump my leg when I get really restless. Sometimes I just do it without noticing o.o

IansDad
05-11-07, 01:25 AM
If you took offence to this statement, perhaps an explanation would help. When I say "nip it in the bud", I am referring to classroom control. Different people have a different definition of chaos. Some teachers don't see a problem with a lot of noise or fooling around, but it can be very difficult for some students to stay focussed and on task when others are talking, wandering around the room, etc.

IansDad, what did you think I meant?

Well, since you asked.:soapbox: But, I warn you now, this could get long and rambling. Sorry.

The attitude expressed in phrases like "classroom control", "nip it in the bud", "fooling around", etc, implies that ADHD is a discipine problem. Also, the phrase "nip it in the bud" sounds, to me, like a minimization of the issue. Like: no big deal, I'll just nip that in the bud and we can move on.

I do understand what you are saying, though. So don't get me wrong. I agree that the classroom environment should be conducive to learning, and minimizing distractions is part of that, especially for us hyper-types. But I don't think that the actions implied by "control" are necessarily the correct route to achieving that.

Take it from a person who made it through school despite the antiquated thinking that ADHD symptoms are a discipinary problem, it doesn't help just to keep the noisy and fidgety ones quiet. I'm old enough that when I was in grade school in Louisiana, Texas, Mississippi, and Virginia, (military dad) they still used the paddle. I would routinely get taken into the hall and struck by a teacher because I couldn't control my fidgeting. In retrospect, I think that some of those teachers used the paddle to vent their frustration at not knowing what to do with me.

The question teachers (and I hope to be one soon) should be asking is, "Am I doing everything I can (within reason, I understand how difficult teaching is) to ensure that my students are learning as much as each individual can?" Spending your energy keeping them "quiet" or stopping the "fooling around" is a waste of time. Even for an extreme case like myself, if a teacher had just taken the time to make the lessons interesting enough, (e.g. by varying the delivery, using multimedia, etc.) I would have sat still and paid attention. Instead, too many teachers are only interested in getting through the lesson plan, and forget to focus on getting the lesson through to the kids. Monotone lecturing, having students read paragraphs out of a textbook, or insisting to do several examples of the same type of problem at the blackboard or an overhead projector (among other boring techniques) invites kids (especially hyper ones, but really all kids) to lose interest. Even if they are struggling and need the extra examples, once the kids realize that they aren't going to get it no matter how many times you rehash the material, the ones that need the extra help will tune out, too.

Now, I know that some of the impications that I make are unrealistic in many schools due to class sizes, the amount of material needed to be covered, and parent, student, and administration apathy. So don't reply with a defeatist attitude. The best teachers I have known overcome these shortcomings because they genuinely care about educating young minds and put their energy into devising alternatives for their classrooms. The worst might have started out idealistically, but eventually give up due to frustration and just go through the motions.

This second group are the ones that usually blame their lack of being able to successfully teach their students on the students themselves: "These rotten kids these days. It's not like when I was in school." Guess what, yes it is. Kids are kids. True that some of today's kids are spoiled. True that the prevailing attitude among many parents today is to celebrate mediocrity rather than bruise the child's tiny little ego. (My opinions about the sacficing of excellence in the name of self-esteem are meant for another discussion.) But in general, there have always been ADHD kids (diagnosed or not) rotten kids (like bullies) quiet kids, studious kids, shy kids, attention seekers, etc. And there always will be.

Okay rant over. If I misunderstood your intentions, then I apologize. :foot: Please set me straight if this is the case.

FightingBoredom
05-11-07, 11:06 AM
Since I was a kid (a few decades ago) I've "thumped" my leg when I get bored. It's not so much a thump as I raise my heal and bounce my leg up and down with the ball of my foot but my heal never hits the floor. While this is happening I feel the need for MORE input or stimulation.

One thing I learned in my adult education training is that there are different types of learners. Even in the group of people without ADD/ADHD there is a group that learns the subject better and retains it longer if they have something to play with while learning.

When I was doing training in front of groups we called these "table toys". Anything from a stress ball or silly putty to stretchy action figures. Just something to fiddle with while they listened or discussed points.

Of course, these training sessions weren't lecture style teaching by any means...but I won't get on my soap box about lecturing vs. facilitated learning.

Imnapl
05-11-07, 01:25 PM
Okay rant over. If I misunderstood your intentions, then I apologize. :foot: Please set me straight if this is the case.I'd love to hear from you after you have done some student teaching.

IansDad
05-13-07, 02:45 AM
I'd love to hear from you after you have done some student teaching.That's funny. Exactly the type of responce I expected.

Like I said, I know that some schools/districts/departments/communities, etc, make this very difficult if not impossible, due to budget cuts, workload, apathy, class size, etc.

Once again, I had started to say alot more. But I deleted it. Imnapl, I know you've been reading another thread where I let a rant get away from me, and seen that I've had to write thousands of words to explain myself. I don't want to have to do that same sort of thing here also. But, to be fair, I will offer a few words:

I don't want to insult anyone, especially teachers. To me, teaching is the noblest thing a person can do. If the world was right and people were paid by the importance of their jobs and not by the profitability of their enterprise, then teachers, firefighters, police officers, etc, would be paid like pro athletes, actors and musicians, and vice versa.

I have spent countless hours in many different classrooms (urban, rural, suburban) and it doesn't change my opinion on how students deserve to be taught. I have seen the worst: my dad's gang-riddled classrooms in a South Dallas HS. And the best: just go to http://weirdward.net/ My old chem teacher's site, set up by former students.

How they deserve to be taught and what's realistic are two different things, I realize that. But no matter what, it's a teacher's duty to always strive to do what's best for the student. If they lose sight of that, or give up, or resign themselves to mediocrity because anything more is too difficult, then it's time to reconsider the calling to teach. Teaching is such a difficult thing to do, maybe THE most difficult. Which is also why I give my respect to anyone who is out there doing their best to teach.

Imnapl
05-13-07, 12:51 PM
That's funny. Exactly the type of responce I expected. From me, or from people in general?


How they deserve to be taught and what's realistic are two different things, I realize that. But no matter what, it's a teacher's duty to always strive to do what's best for the student. If they lose sight of that, or give up, or resign themselves to mediocrity because anything more is too difficult, then it's time to reconsider the calling to teach. Teaching is such a difficult thing to do, maybe THE most difficult. Which is also why I give my respect to anyone who is out there doing their best to teach.This has nothing to do with the issue of classroom management. :confused:

Imnapl
05-13-07, 02:24 PM
I think the standing on their knees aka kneeling is a good sign. It's a sign that the child is interested in what's going on and it trying to pay attention.Tara, I missed this post and your assumption makes perfect sense. I was a parent volunteer at my son's school and would listen to/read to kids in the hallway. When he was in grade 2, I noticed he was standing by his desk, doing his work. Later, I asked my son if his pants were wet due to sliding down the snow at recess and he said his teacher lets them do it. In hindsight, this teacher was the perfect teacher for ADHD kids, but we didn't know about ADHD then.

IansDad
05-14-07, 11:16 PM
From me, or from people in general?
It's a typical response. Again, I don't want to be mean or insulting. Therefore, I'll try to put it the best way I can: I expected you to use the fact that I am not a teacher YET to discount my opinion. Continued below...


This has nothing to do with the issue of classroom management. :confused:
You are absolutely right, ensuring that ADHD children have a fair shot at learning has absolutely nothing whatsoever to do with classroom management. I wrote quite a long post trying to explain my comments and I was so worried that my point got muddled because I was trying to answer without being a jerk.

Now I know that was a smart-*** way to reply. I did it on purpose. I sincerely hope that you understand why trying "deal" with an ADHD child's symptoms by "nipping them in the bud" or seeing the symptom of a learning disability as a "classroom management" issue is insulting to a person who lived through ignorant teachers attempting to "manage" me with discipine. It's a wonder I graduated at all, much less with academics and test scores that could get me into college. At least my teachers had an excuse, it was the '70's and '80's, they had much less information to go by and were ignorant through no fault of their own. Nowadays, teachers are obligated by law to recognize and make concessions for children with learning disabilities, and ADHD is defined within those laws.

I have nothing against you personally, and I assume that you feel the same. Therefore, I am operating under the assumption that you continue to goad me into writing more and more on a subject that I really didn't want to elaborate on in the first place because you truly didn't understand what I was trying to say. I do ramble and it's easy to lose my point amongst my inane babble. That part wasn't smart-*****, it's true and I am very aware of that aspect of myself.

So here it is in a nutshell: I was insulted by your attitude. Children who have ADHD have even less control than us hyper adults because they don't understand why they fidget. Therefore, discipline (or whatever pc word you want to use, eg classroom management) is ineffective and shouldn't be employed at all with a child whose legs (or arms or hands, etc) are fidgety in the classroom. Instead, the classroom environment should be altered in order that all students' attention can be held, thereby minimizing ADHD symptoms in inattentive children. There are many books, workshops, etc, you can use to learn to do this. Tara can probably point you in the right direction.

If you still don't get what I'm saying, please try to figure it out, for your students' sakes. As for me, I am surprised I have tolerated repeating myself this long. Please don't ask me to again.

IansDad
05-14-07, 11:52 PM
Unfortunately, the time limit for editing expired before I could delete the above post. Please disregard as my comments are meaningless. I assumed I was dealing with someone who was a teacher, and also someone whose goal here was to help. I found out too late that neither is the case.

chloe516
05-15-07, 05:42 PM
I fidget, always have. I teach my students how to fidget appropriately. Most kids need to fidget. I do "wiggle breaks" to get the whole class moving for a few minutes if the lesson has been long and they're sitting a while. Usually silent head shoulders knees and toes and I make it faster and slower.

Some things do need to be "nipped in the bud." Last year, I had an ADHD student who was climbing all over furniture, running around the classroom, and this was pretty dangerous. I set my expectations and he had consistent, firm consequences when he did this. After he learned that he wasn't getting away with it, he stopped. He still had some outbursts, he still would sometimes get excited about something and jump up, but he learned hwo to fidget appropriately and if he made a mistake he would usually realize immediately and change his behavior. Yes, this child had hyperactivity, but his ADHD is not an excuse for him to be climbing on the furniture in the classroom and doing karate kicks toward the other children.

Fidgeting is necessary for many of us, I don't think "nipping it in the bud" needs to be bad. It doesn't necessarily mean punishment or negative consequences.

For me, I nip the more distracting fidgeting for the less distracting fidgeting techniques so the kids who need to move can, and the kids who need the quiet have more of that as well. It is classroom/behavior management in a way that it's giving the children techniques they can use forever.

meadd823
05-16-07, 01:59 AM
Well now some conversations that took place in my area make more sense. sorry I am a nosy one.

I think there may be an issue of "semantics" and difficulty with connotation.

Brief bunny trail I shall endeavor to connect to the subject.

I belong to a message board that only allows medical professionals, you have to have a valid nursing license to join. The reason is because if non-nurses came along and read our post we would sound cruel and heartless. The same words in the English language can mean so many different things thus the intentions are easy to mis-understand simply because of the diverse perspectives.

I you were to read a post saying some thing like "I am glad Mr X finally died, I am sure you are relieved."

Some here may "get it" if you have had experience with the terminally ill but many of you would be going wtf kind of people are you any way . . . if you don't like caring for sick people why be a nurse". The fact of the matter is these words have a specific meaning in the context of nursing that is easy for other nurses to see but not so easy for people who haven't worked with very sick people who are suffering. As a nurse myself I would easily see the death as a relief FOR s Mr X was no longer in constant agony. Medicine has advanced in pain control but frankly there are those occasion where no matter what we do or administer the patient still suffers and we "feel" for them, family can walk off when they can't handle it any more but we cannot and we have to remain professional and composed no matter how we feel as a fellow human being. . . we have to hold it inside because falling to pieces will not do any thing to help the patient. . other nurse know this and most are accustom to dealing with death more so than most other professionals. . . I would automatically know what another nurse meant just as may of you teachers did when you read the words "class room management"



As a non-teacher I can understand how "class room management" would generate much the same response my example about Mr X's death I can relate to the wtf kind of people are you any way response.

What stops me is I understand teachers probably have their own professional understanding like nurses do. For teachers these words "class room management" have a specific connotation that is different than the one I would have. You are seeing them as an education professional where I am reading them as a hyperactive child who has had many an unpleasant experience in the public school system or as a mother of ADD children traumatized by failed attempts at having their behavior "managed"


I wanted to help all understand how and why these misunderstandings take place. . . why words sound unusually cruel or why some one reacts in a way that is extreme. Remember we do not see things as they are we see them as we are. . . .

btw - for those who accommodate your wiggly hyperactives kinds good for you. The fidget toys is a most excellent idea Where were you when I was in school?

As a hyperactive child I grew up knowing mostly what it was like to be misunderstood and often I felt as if my personal feeling weren't important only my ability to "conform" to rules made by people who did not know what it was like to feel pain from lack of physical movement.

For us hyperactive children movement brings clarity, our motion isn't the enemy of learning it facilitates it. Notice studies often show the hyperactive ADD varieties do NOT have long term memory problems. . .motion is a type of learning.

Only creatures that move have brains. . . . if you did not move you would not have needed a brain. . . . brains and movement are interconnected.

Having to focus on being still despite the physical discomfort meant I was less able to focus on what was being taught by the teacher. I understand you have 30+ student to deal with and you have to provide a learning atmosphere for 30+ different kinds of kids. . . .man I would rather be beat with the cat of nine tails I could not do it. . . .

Although I understand teachers have a horrendous job trying to teach so many different types of children please remember many of us who respond are grown ADD children who were treated like crap by teachers who didn't even try to understand . . . .a little tolerance and allowances for the many different perspective and experiences is a practice we all need to strive to attain. . . . . we all learn so much more if we will try to see the other sides point of view as well as our own.

Thanks for reading. . . . .

Crazy~Feet
05-16-07, 05:11 AM
Those of us who have ADHD, imagine an unmedicated ADDer of any type trying to take a "timed test" :faint:. Sometimes I think even the best of teachers are hampered by the almighty curriculum. It says "Thou shalt have timed tests" and those teachers have to comply :mad:. Its lousy all the way around. Teachers should be able to focus on making sure that the entire class learns the subject matter, and IMHO timed tests prove nothing except that a certain percentage of the children are able to answer certain questions within an certain time period. It does nothing to prove how well the teacher taught the class, because had there been no time limits, the children who have difficulty focusing, or have anxiety about tests, or have dyslexia or dyscalculia or any other LD might have actually learned just as well as those kids that can reply within that allotted time period.

In short, it stinks on ice. The teachers must comply with that curriculum and its got to be disenheartening for them to think that they failed to get things across to part of the class, when that may not be the case at all.

Imnapl
05-16-07, 09:51 AM
Re: timed tests. Barbara Coloroso feels the same way about timed tests, C~F, and rightly so.

Meadd, thanks for your input. It's often the ADHD kid who complains about other kids' distracting behaviour. It's an observable fact and documented in the literature. If the right structure isn't there, the sensory overload kicks in, the ADHD kid reacts and guess who gets in trouble?

I learned to write cursive with a nibbed pen and ink - on the old wooden desks that had inkwells. Educators and parents were pretty well allowed to do what they liked, short of murder, to make me tow the line. I spent most of grade one standing in the corner or in front of the class with a finger over my mouth. Great beginning to an education, right?

If we don't deal with trauma, it becomes pervasive and taints things we touch. If our current therapy isn't helping, then we need to keep seeking help. Our kids are worth it.

meadd823
05-17-07, 07:06 PM
Imnapl isn't it sooo ADD like to be the most distracting while also being the most easily distracted. . .irony is truly the dessert of life.

If the material was interactive I was more able to focus no matter what happened but if I were simply trying to listening to a lecture or a film I could hear some one open a gum wrapper in the next class room. Some times during those long silent periods when we were supposed to be working on some thing I knew what was going on in every class room around me. . . One time I over heard an entire portion of a social studies class across the hall and actually remember it the next year when I was that class. I often jiggled my leg, wiggled my foot and I often got in trouble for tilting my desk, just to see how far I could go before I was A) caught and told to quit it B) whet SPLAT into the floor. By Jr High I was pretty decent at desk balancing but I sure frustrated a lot of teachers in grade school getting that way.

I believe these kids do what I often did and that is supply them selves a secondary sensory input to maintain attention to the lesson. I agree with those above who do facilitate this need. I remember teachers who would allow for structured stretch times. One of my favorite teachers Ms Perry in th e fourth grade was one who would put on the "do the hookey pookey" record {CDs weren't invented yet} before test because she believed to get the blood moving in the body was to get it moving in the brain as well. She let me run errans because I liked to move and needed to move I think some how even though ADD knowledge was decades away she knew I wasn't trying to be a bad kid I simply could not sit still and pay attention. I made good grades in her class and would have followed her to hell had she asked me to. . . . I now look back and see a teacher who was before her time in ideas.

I did have some crap teachers but I also had some really good ones. I understand one can not let 30+ students run wild nor should one student be allowed to prevent the other 29 from being able to learn. The structured "wiggle breaks" and the member mentioning dealing with inappropriate wiggling by offering forms of wiggling that were less distracting for others are right on the money. ADD children especially hyperactive ones do need structure the most valuable type is the compassionate approach. . . it is about working with who the child is as opposed to expecting them to be what they were never designed to be and that would including sitting still for an entire hour. . .


Heck I am 40+ and even on medication I find it difficult to sit for an hour. . . . but at my age they call it exercise and being energetic but when I was in school many called it "problem behavior". I like being a grown up because I can now go to the bath room without asking permission. . . . as long as I remain in the right professions I am actually valued because I have a lot of energy. . . .I am no longer expected to sit motionless for an hour I often wonder why we expect our children to. Over half the adult population is considered "over weight" and are encouraged in increased their physical activity. I wonder how many of these over weight people simply learned how to sit still all too well.

meadd823
05-17-07, 07:13 PM
Sometimes I think even the best of teachers are hampered by the almighty curriculum.

CF I know little about being a teacher but I am betting they have regulations out the wazoo. I mean what profession doesn't these days?