View Full Version : PDA Graphing Software?


CrAcKerKoReaN
03-29-07, 11:19 AM
Not really sure where to put this so I will try here first, mods please move if not approriate.

I have started using a PDA and it really helps.
To do list, things to buy calenday etc.

I was wondering, I know there is a world of software out there and I am hunting for somthing for me.

Currently I am taking Calc III and Physics and it would be helpful to have a 3D graphing software.
Unfortunetly I cannot do this on my TI-85 or I would just use it.
I would love to get an HP-48GX but they are expensice for a almost 10 year old calculator.

Any help would be apprecited.

mathminded
09-16-07, 03:38 AM
Always great to see another student in the general vicinity of mathematics! :D

I have never searched for them personally, but have yet to hear of any graphing utilities for PDAs. I am not sure exactly what you're intending to graph from Calc III, but if you're looking for a graphing utility that for your PDA that can handle multiple variable functions, partial differentiation, double and triple integrals, vector valued functions, and beyond (all of these being staples of third semester calc), I would imagine you will be hard pressed to find anything suitable for the job for two reasons:
1. The methods of input into a PDA are not mathematical-jargon-friendly. This is a user end issue, though, so if you are alright with the inputs it would of course be fine.
2. (And much more importantly) the computations involved in graphing multiple variable functions would eat up a lot of the processing power of most PDAs. This does not even mention the amount of work for the system to generate a numeric solution to particularly nasty integrals, derivatives, and all manners of things Calc III.

I'm not sure if it's worth it/feasible for you, but if you really want to have a graphing utility that can aid you in your current classes and far beyond in both mathematics and physics, you might want to consider a CAS like Mathematica, Maple (the one I won at a raffle during a conference and have used ever since), or MatLab. If you're in college, then your Math department will almost undoubtedly have at least one of these systems available in the computer lab for your computing needs. The downsides to these are that they are far too large for a normal PDA (installation would probably make the thing melt) and as such require some form of computer to use and that they are typically a large investment (compared to most software and all common calculators). If you're interested, however, PM me and I can help you decide which would be best for you.

Other than these, options are fairly limited. Although the classic model is hard to come by after having been replaced by the Titanium version, the TI-89 is a phenomenal calculator that is still after years on the market reigning supreme as the most powerful calculator for students that's allowed on (most) tests and in (most) classes. As a tangent, I saw an article awhile back talking about the worlds most powerful calculator. Apparently a cell phone company invented a phone that can send and receive messages to/from Mathematica on a specified computer, allowing for a complete version of the Mathematica beast to be used in a portable product.

Hope this has helped and happy hunting! If you ever find yourself interested in discussing Calc III or any other delicious maths feel free to PM me. :)

CrAcKerKoReaN
09-16-07, 02:31 PM
I completly forgot about this post. And I love mathmatics, I find it very fun at times an its actually something I am good at.

The reason I wanted to graph 3D functions was more to under stand the shapes and how the different values related. Come to find out I really didnt need it.

I eneded up with a 50g (HP still makes graphing calcs) and it did everything well and very fast.

This was this past spring semester and I have to say I got As in everything (calc III, physics and linear alge).

Next summer I will be going to a 4 year university that is highly focused on engineering. I know they use Matlab there and since I have do not have any experience with it I guess I need to see if I can find a demo or something to play with.

mathminded
09-16-07, 04:36 PM
I completly forgot about this post.Sorry bout that; I impulsively responded without looking at the date this was posted. :o
Oh well!

And I love mathmatics, I find it very fun at times an its actually something I am good at.
Glad to hear it! It's certainly my past time of choice!
What's your major? At least at my university, t's rare to get engineers admitting that they really enjoy maths. :)

The reason I wanted to graph 3D functions was more to under stand the shapes and how the different values related. Come to find out I really didnt need it.

I eneded up with a 50g (HP still makes graphing calcs) and it did everything well and very fast.

This was this past spring semester and I have to say I got As in everything (calc III, physics and linear alge).

Next summer I will be going to a 4 year university that is highly focused on engineering. I know they use Matlab there and since I have do not have any experience with it I guess I need to see if I can find a demo or something to play with. It does really help to know the shape of the functions you're dealing with. I'm more inclined toward the algebraic side of the aisle usually, but geometric representations, especially when you're looking at functions in 3-space for the first time, are very helpful. Glad to see you found a calculator that works for you!

Congrats about going to the university! Which one is it, just out of curiousity? My friend is at Georgia State using the oh-so-amazing-sounding financial aid package the state awards GA residents for remaining in state. She tells me though that Georgia Tech is awesome in terms of its engineering / science majors.