View Full Version : What things frustrate you the most; what do you do about them? (Assignment Question!)


ADDitives
03-31-07, 10:16 AM
I have a uni assignment which is a pretend job application for a teaching job. Part of it is that we have to write dot point answers to Interview Questions.

One of the questions is

What things frustrate you the most? How would you cope with these in the school environment?

I'm not sure how to attack that question. I certainly don't want to put anything too personal in there (like 'being misunderstood' and 'i would cope with this by keeping to myself where necessary' )

So I'll throw this out to all of you..

What things frustrate you the most, and how do you cope with these things in the school environment?

Hopefully this will help me with my assignment, but also create some supportive dialogue between the teachers on here.

FightingBoredom
03-31-07, 10:24 AM
It may take some research on your part to find those things that commonly frustrate everyone and then search yourself to see if you share the same frustration.

That way...it's not private information, it is personal, and it is shared by many people so those reading your response will understand it.

ADDitives
03-31-07, 10:26 AM
Yeah that's my idea. So, FightingBoredom... do you have a response....??

FightingBoredom
03-31-07, 10:44 AM
I've been out of school for much longer than most car models have existed. :p

I do recall that the most frustrating thing about school was a teacher or professor who would just blather on about the subject for an entire class.
There was no interaction, no discussion, no chance for anyone in the class to have a personal insight. It was just like we were all there to listen to the performance and take notes.

I can learn more from a book in 1/20th the time than I can listening to someone blather on about their insights into the matter.

On the flip side--I love watching teachers who facilitate learning and get students involved. I think the best teacher uses what I like to call the "lazy principle". They make the students do the research and then guide them to the knowledge and understanding through discussion and debate and discovery.

ADDitives
03-31-07, 10:46 AM
Thanks for your input.

Just to clarify for everyone though, the assignment is for my teaching degree, so the question explicitly means...

What frustrates you the most, and how would you cope with these AS A TEACHER, in the school environment?

VisualImagery
04-01-07, 09:42 PM
I am a teacher have I got a list for you:

Asking to go to the bathroom-it becomes a disease in some classes
pencil or other noisy tapping or other distractions
private conversations
using materials and supplies improperly-depends on subject though
putting head down or sleeping (illegal fantasy-super soaker or air horn)
messing with my stuff or others stuff
interrupting me during instructions
name calling and put downs and bullying
not being prepared and asking for a pencil, paper etc
forgetting textbook and not doing anywork-means disrupting class

I have methods, policies, procedures, options etc for these behaviors, just thought a list would help you out! And they do ask questions like these!

tjmamais
04-02-07, 08:31 PM
As a teacher, my frustrations come from students who don't try. I call them my spoon feeders. They want me to spoon feed them the information and digest it for them. I ask a lot of questions and so many students know that they won't get a straight answer from me. Not that stops students from taking the easy way out but in does slow down a little.

VisualImagery
04-02-07, 09:05 PM
Forgot about those-even one in a class can be very disruptive. They get really po'd when you don't "give"them the answer. I tell them that is their job, and show them how to find the answer. I think I will limit them to 3 questions and help if they can show me what they did to try to find the answer next time I have one like that. They don't like or want to think. Somehow they have caught the learned helplessness disease.

ADDitives
04-03-07, 09:51 AM
Parents that won't help their children... and I've seen quite a few of these. I'm not sure if that's really something that's "interview material" because then I have to come up with an answer to that, and there's no easy answer.... Maybe asking the parent what they think should be done to help their child, but they don't always know/ want to do anything.

ADDitives
04-09-07, 05:43 AM
Here's what I have written for my assignment. There are other 'frustrations' I have, but none of these are appropriate to include in the assignment, because they would not be appropriate to say during a job invertiew!


¬ Frustration: Students who have misconceptions in mathematics, due to incorrect teaching of concepts in earlier years.


¬ Strategies:
<O:p</O:p

1. Understanding that this is a problem not only with other teachers, but a problem within me. I need to ensure that I teach concepts correctly, using appropriate vocabulary.

2. Proactivity such as the development of a whole-school quality-control program for mathematics teaching. If such a program is developed on a long-term basis, all students in the school should achieve the age-appropriate ‘benchmarks’ in mathematics.
<O:p</O:p
<O:p</O:p

¬ Frustration: Parents who are unwilling to help their children.



¬ Strategies:

1. I encountered this problem during one of my teaching practices. The teacher and I worked together to develop open communication with the parents.

2. The teacher and I devised a school-based intervention program for child. While the program would have been of maximal benefit when combined with home-based intervention, this was not possible.

Slowpoke
05-06-07, 03:34 PM
it's interesting to read the frustrations, as I'm a Sp Ed Assistant and have to be creative about what to do about the situations...

I have some suggestions which have worked in most cases...

but before I say them, I'd like to ask the teachers here to think about the things that are facilitating these situations...

what are you doing?
what are you NOT doing?
what can you do?

-spoon feeders: usually they've become used to people telling them what to do. learned helplessness.
what works is to take the responsibility off yourself and make them realize that it's THEIR OWN CHOICE whether or not they want to do the BETTER CHOICE

use a question format to get them to answer
-if they give "I don't know" then you ask them to think first, or have a brainstorming session, or ask leading questions
-if they give you "I don't feel like it" without answering "what should you be doing?" then remind them that they didn't answer the question you asked. making the students SAY OUT LOUD what they should be doing helps them focus and feel responsible

-explicitly say "it's YOUR CHOICE what to do. you know what the better choice is, it's up to you. whatever YOU choose to do is what I write down in my observations, which becomes your grades"
they don't usually like it, but it works. I say it in a neutral voice...

sometimes you have to lead them through what would happen if they dont' do the work.

if they're asking what they're to do next, then ask them what the next step is, if they don't know, ask them how they can find out. if they say they don't know, then ask them what are the other students doing?

you can always post a "problem solving list" on the wall and direct them to that when they're not feeling like using their brains
(eg. what to do if you don't know what to do 1. ask someone 2. look at what others are doing ....etc)

if they ask what a word means, then direct them to a dictionary

----------

bathroom breaks
-what I see that works really well in most classes is to have a list of the boys names and girls names by the door
with a red clothes pin and a blue clothes pin
the student who needs to go to the bathroom simply gets up and puts the peg by their name on their way out, and back at the top on their way back in

only one student is allowed at a time of each gender

NO bathroom breaks during teacher lessons or sharing (only during individual work)

teacher keeps an eye on anyone who is taking lots of breaks and limits them
or has a timer in the class - if student is not back within 5 minutes, then the extra time is made up after school or at recess etc. (helping with class chores etc)

----------------------

private conversations

-unacceptable. call them on it. identify it as DISRESPECTFUL and ask the students to stop. if they continue, separate them. if they continue, they go out in the hallway, or to the office, to the library with a note and that has to be signed by the librarian...

depends on the level of the class.
you have to follow up on the consequences consistently if it's going to work. the students won't like it at first, but they'll learn after about a week if you stick to it and don't give in to their whining.

you can take action on whining as well

make sure you explicitly show (or post the rules) the students the consequneces. have them say what happens when they're not respecting the rules. it makes them feel more responsible when they say it. having the poster with it written helps make it less of a personal attack, as the whole class is responsible.

you can also tell students that they can ask others to stop talking if they're being disruptive.
---------------------

interrupting during instructions

-keep going, ingnoring them. give them gestural prompt to be quiet. if they continue, explicitly tell them it's RUDE to interrupt, and ask them to wait until you're finished and then ask. if they say they're going to forget, then ask them to write their question down

explicitly praise others who have their hand up and wait to be called on. don't answer questions of people who call out questions. put finger to lips and raise hands while lookint at student who is calling out

if they continue, then have a private chat. if they're being cheeky, then it's attitude and they get sent out to do independent work in the library (let librarian know they're being sent there)

it's not mean to tell students that interrupting is rude. b/c it is. let them know it is, and then tell them what they should do. continue talking, and then call on the student, and first thank them for waiting with their hand up and not calling out

tedious? yes, at first. but once the students see that calling out is not going to get them answers, then they're going to stop

if they're doing it to get laughs, then it's a respect issue and they get sent out to talk to the principal or whatever. they don't get to be part of the class if they're not oging to repsect you. it's their choice. make them answer the questions about what they're doing, and why they're being sent out.
----------

name calling etc.

STOP THE BEHAVIOUR AT ONCE.
explicitly say it's inappropriate, disrespectful.
it can get out of hand. I was a victim of bullying in school and I'm very upset that teachers did not do anything, they hear it, but left it alone b/c they didnt think it was a big deal.

get the school counsellor involved if it's one student in particular or a group of students teasing others.

make it known that disrespectful language/comments will NOT be tolerated in your classroom.

follow up on it.
again, it will take them some getting used to... but it will settle down.


for all of these, you can have posters up where people can see them, and refer them to the posted rules and consequences when the situation happens. do this consistently, and students will see that you're being fair to everyone.

I hope this helps....

if anyone else has any suggestions please add them!

I'm always compiling strategies on how to deal with behavioural issues... it's my specialization as an SEA (behavioural and LD focus)

sighduck
01-28-11, 08:17 AM
I am a teacher have I got a list for you:

Asking to go to the bathroom-it becomes a disease in some classes
pencil or other noisy tapping or other distractions
private conversations
using materials and supplies improperly-depends on subject though
putting head down or sleeping (illegal fantasy-super soaker or air horn)
messing with my stuff or others stuff
interrupting me during instructions
name calling and put downs and bullying
not being prepared and asking for a pencil, paper etc
forgetting textbook and not doing anywork-means disrupting class

I have methods, policies, procedures, options etc for these behaviors, just thought a list would help you out! And they do ask questions like these!

wow... you would have really hated me if i was a student in your class...the only things i didnt do on that list was messing with peoples stuff, nmecalling/bullying (i was the victim of that usually) and the constant bathroom breaks

insight needed
01-28-11, 09:25 AM
Slowpoke, you're GOOD! You'd be an asset to any classroom!

insight needed
01-28-11, 09:28 AM
ADDitives, I'd be careful of that phrase "parents who are unwilling to help their children". While we all know that there are parents out their like that, administrators might not see that as the politically correct way to say it. I'd go for something like, "children whose parents do not provide them with the academic support that they need". "Unwilling" could be perceived as being judgemental.