View Full Version : What is the best seat for these special students?


Proud2BAteacher
04-15-07, 04:00 PM
I am doing my 4th marking period seating chart...just wondering, if anyone knows of a "good seat" to seat an adhd girl. She is very hyper- talkative. Front or back? Last marking period I had her in the corner seat by my desk...but I want to change her seat. I just don't know where to? Do you guys think the opposite corner in the front?

I feel that where a student sits plays a major role. I just want to make a good choice!

Thanks!

Imnapl
04-15-07, 04:56 PM
How about trying a few different seats before making up your seating chart? I like to be a the back of a class so I don't wonder what's going on behind me.

Proud2BAteacher
04-15-07, 05:07 PM
I like to be a the back of a class so I don't wonder what's going on behind me.

Hm. I never thought about that. Thanks for your input!

speedo
04-15-07, 05:43 PM
My guess would be to keep her front-and-center so that she is not so easily distracted away from you visually by the other students.

ME :D


I am doing my 4th marking period seating chart...just wondering, if anyone knows of a "good seat" to seat an adhd girl. She is very hyper- talkative. Front or back? Last marking period I had her in the corner seat by my desk...but I want to change her seat. I just don't know where to? Do you guys think the opposite corner in the front?

I feel that where a student sits plays a major role. I just want to make a good choice!

Thanks!

auntchris
04-15-07, 09:59 PM
I am in the front seat. I am an adult but still it is easier to see and pay attention.

I think if you had her sit in front you could let her know through eye contact or standing next to her while talking or just being hyper to pay focus.

I know when my tteacher stand next to me I feel a sense of comfort and that she really understands me as a person.

VisualImagery
04-15-07, 10:11 PM
There are a lot of seating possibilites-the best seat is wherever she is able to be on task and not overly talkative.

Question-does she do her work? If so and if she works in class, how about next to a quiet student who can help her if she needs to check directions or what she heard or a little extra help on in class assignments?

I had a signal with a student who talked and asked way too many questions. Rub your nose-tap head, whatever you come up with. Talk with IEP case manager too-they are great help with this-often will talk with the student. Can she go to a resource room to do independent work? Some of my students did this-it really helped them-and was good for me and the rest of the class too.

Also, why not just ask her where she would be able to work best-(not who to sit with)? Sometimes the kids know what works best for them. Just keep her away from any friends that make her talk more! This worked better for me than anything else-but only with kids who really want to do well in class-or are willing to particpate and do their work.

Here are two real scenarios:
I had a male student with ADD who talked all the time-putting him in front seemed to encourage him, putting him in back-he didn't pay attention and zoned out. But, he didn't care about doing any work and flunked the same class with 2 different teachers. Another student who flunked the first time-was struggling and unmedicated then. Second time he asked to sit next to another student who helped him stay on task and motivated. It was great! No cheating or anything-but we had a deal-if there were problems I would separate them. When I put them together he was on task and doing his own work. Got a C after a lot of work, encouragement and tutoring after school-His smile was priceless! Neat kid, I miss being at that school.


You don't have ADD do you? If not, thank you for being so caring and proactive in working with your students. I have ADD and find it helps me connect with these kids-no room for excuses and they know I will help them however I can. But, I do not allow ADD to be used as an excuse for inappropriate behavior, not doing any work, or disrespect/rudeness-I do accommodate wiggliness and give alternatives to tapping pencils on the desk-my pet peeve when talking! However, mine are in high school and will transition to college and the workforce. I have to help them develop classroom/workplace skills they need to succeed once out of the k-12 environment. I find a positive, proactive approach works very well-and will refer any student who prevents the rest of the class from learning or chooses to break school rules. There are consequences, but I don't yell or belittle or put down.

I teach high school-what grade do you teach? I might have missed it.

QueensU_girl
04-15-07, 11:15 PM
Probably the front at the end. Being in the *front middle* would put students on ALL SIDES of her. (Not near an open window, or loud, busy hallway, though.)

In the back or middle, and she'll be distracted by the audience around her, and distract them, too. Too many chances to be a 'chatty Cathy'.

ADHDers with distraction issues need fewer voices around them.

It's a hard call.

NB Sometimes girls hyperactivity can come out as verbal behaviour, rather than physical behaviour.

Lots of exercise tends to help settle ADHDers down and help both ADD & ADHDers become more 'focused'.

e.g. 30 minutes/day of running, soccer, swimming, gymnastics, etc.

Some ADHDers are helped immensely by working out every day, or several times/day. (John Ratey has a book coming out about the mental benefits of exercise, i hear.)

justhope
04-15-07, 11:30 PM
Speaking as an Adult Add'er who wasn't medicated until adulthood, and was failed by the system, the only thing that helped me was sitting front & center, which my mother and I both asked for. Had to be away from halls & windows.


All 3 of my son's who have ADD, are seated in the front middle of the class. it's a special request from me, at the start of the year, with the letter of "here is what to expect from my kid & me" that goes to the teacher. Followed shortly by a personal visit by me, to get to know the teacher and let them know what I expect from them and my child.

casper
04-16-07, 12:24 AM
I personally like the back of the room. This way I can sneak out and wander when I get a little bored or feel the need to stretch. I think its good to be able to look out the window every now and then, a chance to re-focus and such.

I guess it really depends on teh age of hte child.

~boots~
04-16-07, 12:24 AM
I have to agree with most :-)
front..away from the door,away from windows, and in direct eye contact..

oh, and if I was sat near someone I didn't like, or felt they didn't like me, I was a LOT better..

Slowpoke
05-06-07, 03:06 PM
I have ADHD and I work as a Special Ed Assistant in classrooms.

The front and center is usually effective if the teacher is spending a lot of time at the front. That way the teacher can use specific "signals" with the student to let her know she's off track (tapping desk, standing right in front of student).

Back of the class is not good, b/c the student is far away from the teacher and there are way more visual and audio distractions in between student and the focus.

One thing that really helped with a student who was VERY hyperactive (getting out of seat, not paying attention, talking etc) was to have a piece of paper with the subjects of the day on them. Each time the student was ON TASK I would simply go over, put a tick mark on the paper and say "good job! you're working very quietly."

-the KEY is to be SPECIFIC about exactly what the student is doing right; and to POINT OUT that she or he is doing what they're supposed to be doing

other options are to allow the students to listen to music on headphones while they work on individual work - as long as they don't hum along.

or have study carrols in the room to send students to, if they are having trouble focusing. you can use this for all students, not just the student with ADHD
(make sure you silence and heckling)

also make it welcome for use if a student wishes to use it as their own choice - I've seen students do this! (make sure you point out that it's a VERY RESPONSIBLE, and GOOD CHOICE)

allowing the whole class a stretch break while you get things arranged helps keep the chatter down.

I find that it's reasonable to expect ALL students to be silent when the teacher is doing a lesson, or when a student is sharing.

having VISUAL reminder system for acceptable noise/conversation levels is also effective. it's more concrete and less personal than you telling a student to be quiet.

I know of a device you can buy that's set to measure how loud a class is getting by stop lights...
you can set the acceptable level and the light will flash if it gets too loud.
using paper signs can also be effective.

let me know if you have any questions.
I love working with students who have ADHD, since I have it myself, we have the most fun converstations and they appreciate that I don't get annoyed when they're off track.

you can also start pointing out that just because you think of something related to it, doesn't mean you have to tell someone or talk about it.

if they do start talking about something seemingly unrelated, I wait until they're finished and then ask "what made you think of that?" and then they tell me it was what we were originally talking about, and then it's easier to get back on track again.
but there are times when it's not appropriate to talk to others, and all students need to remember that. (having a stop light symbol system on the student's desk might help, as you can walk by and tap the appropriate sound level -which you have indicated with a paper clip or something - if the student is talking. It's non-verbal and less intrusive than verbal reprimand.

let me know if you have any questions. :)
just some tips.

Edward
05-06-07, 03:16 PM
I think the sides of the room is not as good as front and center, put that chatty cathy in the front center.

I'm not a teacher but just a student and I've been moved around a lot in high school, Ive had my seat moved multiple times when no one else was moved. When I was at the sides I would turn my body to watch the whole class, but maybe the front center worked better for me becuase when I was at the center I didn't know which way to turn my body so there was equal distractions all around me so maybe thats why I just looked at the front, and I dont know, but being in the front center I think frequently (maybe moreso than other places) reminded me that I have to focus on the teacher.

I donno tho

VisualImagery
05-06-07, 04:51 PM
Most chatty cathy's I have had, and chatty charlie's, love front and center-it is their stage and they talk even more. Sit them next to the quietest student on one side and no one else on the other side.

I also take time to talk to the kids who talk way to much-some do it for attention or to try to bait the teacher-but usually the rest of the class wants to duct tape their mouths-and gosh we teacher's would like to let them. When I tell them privately-and very positively and affirmingly-that it is irritating other students and that if makes it diffcult for kids who struggle with learning, many of them improve a lot! We will even develop a signal of their choice that I use if they start talking to much. My other trick is to have them write all their questions down instead of blurting out-usually they are all answered by the time I am through and they are ready for the project/assignment, otherwise, the floor is open for all students to ask questions.

I also stand by these students while teaching-HS kids hate it! yeah! Sometimes I even pull up a chair and sit by them-this freaks them out and they usually stay much quieter after a time or two of loving "attention."

The whole idea is to handle the problem early in the school year and set limits and work out a system-if not-the semester or year will be miserable for the majority of the class. My goal? Other kids really do get PO'd with kids who won't shut up-and often these students are rude too. Not always, but it is rude to constantly interrupt class to show off or make smart aleck comments. Then these kids wonder why people don't like them etc-so working with them has a lot of benefits for everyone.

Yep, and in my spare time I plan lessons and grade papers/projects, etc!

Proud2BAteacher
05-06-07, 05:17 PM
I have ADHD and I work as a Special Ed Assistant in classrooms.

The front and center is usually effective if the teacher is spending a lot of time at the front. That way the teacher can use specific "signals" with the student to let her know she's off track (tapping desk, standing right in front of student).

Back of the class is not good, b/c the student is far away from the teacher and there are way more visual and audio distractions in between student and the focus.

One thing that really helped with a student who was VERY hyperactive (getting out of seat, not paying attention, talking etc) was to have a piece of paper with the subjects of the day on them. Each time the student was ON TASK I would simply go over, put a tick mark on the paper and say "good job! you're working very quietly."

-the KEY is to be SPECIFIC about exactly what the student is doing right; and to POINT OUT that she or he is doing what they're supposed to be doing

other options are to allow the students to listen to music on headphones while they work on individual work - as long as they don't hum along.

or have study carrols in the room to send students to, if they are having trouble focusing. you can use this for all students, not just the student with ADHD
(make sure you silence and heckling)

also make it welcome for use if a student wishes to use it as their own choice - I've seen students do this! (make sure you point out that it's a VERY RESPONSIBLE, and GOOD CHOICE)

allowing the whole class a stretch break while you get things arranged helps keep the chatter down.

I find that it's reasonable to expect ALL students to be silent when the teacher is doing a lesson, or when a student is sharing.

having VISUAL reminder system for acceptable noise/conversation levels is also effective. it's more concrete and less personal than you telling a student to be quiet.

I know of a device you can buy that's set to measure how loud a class is getting by stop lights...
you can set the acceptable level and the light will flash if it gets too loud.
using paper signs can also be effective.

let me know if you have any questions.
I love working with students who have ADHD, since I have it myself, we have the most fun converstations and they appreciate that I don't get annoyed when they're off track.

you can also start pointing out that just because you think of something related to it, doesn't mean you have to tell someone or talk about it.

if they do start talking about something seemingly unrelated, I wait until they're finished and then ask "what made you think of that?" and then they tell me it was what we were originally talking about, and then it's easier to get back on track again.
but there are times when it's not appropriate to talk to others, and all students need to remember that. (having a stop light symbol system on the student's desk might help, as you can walk by and tap the appropriate sound level -which you have indicated with a paper clip or something - if the student is talking. It's non-verbal and less intrusive than verbal reprimand.

let me know if you have any questions. :)
just some tips.

THANK YOU SO MUCH! Right now I have her on the end in the front row.
I have been so frustrated on how to handle her actions all year. I feel like when I am teaching I have to stare at her...

As I said, I know an ADHD child can not control their actions nearly as well as non-adhd children. These children also have wonderful days to horrible days. As teachers it's sometimes so hard to remain patient with them, no one is perfect! Now I will share to you what problems I have been facing with her...maybe you can give me some tips! You seem awesome at what you do!!

Here are some examples of her actions:

- ALWAYS blurts out answers and steals other student's problems by just yelling out the answer
-Continually touches,pokes and bothers other children (verbally)
-Gets up almost 5 times during one lesson to "throw something out".
- Squats in chair (like a frog)
- I had to move a child that was sitting behind her b/c he got way to distracted by her
- Turns around in her chair to talk nonstop to students behind her
- Will wait before starting a task....When I ask if she is done...she makes up excuses saying she cannot find a pencil, lost the paper etc.
- Fidgets with objects
- Starts up conversations while other students are working and she should be working
- Interrupts conversations I am having/tasks I am doing
- I always have to repeat directions more than once
- Makes sounds while I am teaching/reading- Bangs things on desk/moves paper with hand

This list can go on but I'll stop here.

We were just about to review a packet for their Math test tomorrow and she got out of her seat to throw "something out". Instead of walking right back over to her desk, she went all the way around roaming the room. (taking the long way back) I said "Sit down please and take out your packet." ... Did I handle this okay? When we were going over it I brought up a stool and sat right infront of her desk. She hardly talked to others with me right there.


Thanks for your time!

Proud2BAteacher
05-08-07, 06:03 PM
Most chatty cathy's I have had, and chatty charlie's, love front and center-it is their stage and they talk even more. Sit them next to the quietest student on one side and no one else on the other side.

I do agree with that statement!

Thanks for your replies!!!

routhy
05-08-07, 06:53 PM
I don't know about everyone else but I always hated teachers trying to put me on the front, I preferred the middle/back, but I'm not ADHD, I'm ADD so I suppose it's a different situation.

USMC
05-10-07, 11:41 AM
Like others have said, it really depends on her. All ADD students are different, and different methods work for them. I was always put at the front center, where the teacher was. I hated it, but I can't say that it didn't help. For some reason, having the teacher right there made me want to behave because I was going to get caught. (It didn't help though when they yelled at me for every little thing. I got frustrated because I couldn't catch a break and it was downhill from there). Also, they could direct my attention back to my work when they noticed I was getting distracted by something else. I got significantly more work done in those classes. Classes in college though, I sit at the back because I don't know anybody and I wanna see what's going on. Also because teachers in college don't help like teachers in high school. You've gotta do things on your own. It would probably help my ADD to sit at the front but I don't know anybody in my college classes so it would be no help to my anxiety whatsoever not knowing who was behind me and what they were doing. That would drive me crazy and I would be thinking about that the whole time. Anyway, sorry about this. Probably didn't help at all, just a bunch of rambling. Just wanted to share my point of view.

Imnapl
05-11-07, 01:51 PM
Classes in college though, I sit at the back because I don't know anybody and I wanna see what's going on. Also because teachers in college don't help like teachers in high school. You've gotta do things on your own. It would probably help my ADD to sit at the front but I don't know anybody in my college classes so it would be no help to my anxiety whatsoever not knowing who was behind me and what they were doing. That would drive me crazy and I would be thinking about that the whole time. Anyway, sorry about this. Probably didn't help at all, just a bunch of rambling. Just wanted to share my point of view.Definitely not rambling. I can totally relate to this.

bandie08
11-13-07, 09:19 AM
Front deffinetly because teachers can keep an eye on the student if they are in the front seat. I heard that a gentle tap on the arm or head can bring back there attention too.

TeLL
11-18-07, 11:01 PM
I was never hyper in class, but had imense troubles staying focused, they teachers tried putting me in front, and it made things worst each time. I would always get anxious about whats behind me, with my mind wandering towards that isntead of work, id get nothing done.

it depends on the child, it really does. also putting a kid front row gives them a full class audience staring right at them if ever they turn around; which is great if the teacher isnt often in front, or very focused on the board

orbit1
11-25-07, 10:03 PM
Easy one, up front. Back of the class is really only good for the best students in my experience.

jc10101
01-02-08, 01:51 AM
i'm an adult with add/adhd traits, and major anxiety. graduated from high school 7 years as a honor student. i agree with what USMC said, i totally agree with him. everyone is different, looking back if i knew what add/adhd was back then 7-15 yrs ago. i would of picked the seat by the door, so i could take a break and leave the room when i get distracted or get anxiety or migraines I really never had any big meltdowns that would be considered a problem for the teachers, , except sometimes my emotions/ energy would go crazy (would be tired, lack of energy,severe migraines. or distracted by others around me) the major issue i had in school, was just the boredom/stress/anxiety from the educational material and the follow students(trouble makers) causing problems. i strongly suggest that you do not pick a adhd/add child to do anything publically (such as a oral presentation) most of the time theyre nervous system will shut down, and wont be able to do nothing. I believe all adhd/add students should be allowed a water bottle and tylenol. or something for migraines. I think the problem that most teachers think all ADHD/ADD students are the trouble makers, which infact it's the other way around. can't say to everyone, but every one who has add/adhd is different, i was a quite person most of the time. never got in trouble and school material was just to boring and had severe anxiety from other students.. teachers didn't bother me at all. felt more safe around them.