View Full Version : i have LD and i wanna go to college but there making it dificult for me


Guest1
06-05-07, 11:03 AM
i can find any college or any votech schools or any community collage that would just let me take courses im willing to pay i just wanna go to college and walk on campus sit in classes i never had the chance to do so cause my learning disabilty i have problems in math in english and gramar but other stuff like history i had a regular class in the history and i had a C for the class so did my sister and she was in regular classes she had the same class to so it ****es me off why they say no to me always i went to take classes for free in votech to get my ged but i never understood halve of the things they tought me so i never passed its irritiating trying and trying nothing happends

krysta
06-08-07, 08:25 PM
Usually you have to take placement tests first, before any community college will let you take any class unless you have already some classes and have decent grades from another college. Usually community colleges offer some basic classes, pre-college level classes that you may need to take first depending on the placement tests. Also, have you looked into the tutoring and support services they offer? For example, you could get a tutor to help you with your papers, such for general grammer editing or paragraph structure for any class even history. Also, there are math tutors.

Guest1
06-10-07, 01:02 AM
they said no everytime i took the class and all so i get rejected always even if im going to pay

auntchris
06-15-07, 04:49 PM
Martza.
Do you have an highschool dipolma or eqilevant, Yet?

That is the first thing you need to do before any Communtiy college or univeristy will accept you.

VisualImagery
06-15-07, 05:14 PM
An unequivocval and absolute requirement before they will admit anyone.

Martza.
Do you have an highschool dipolma or eqilevant, Yet?

That is the first thing you need to do before any Communtiy college or univeristy will accept you.Marytza,
I must assume you dropped out of high school? If you are young enough, you could enter a hs degree program or go back to high school. Otherwise, it is time to really put your heart into getting a GED.

To get into college, community college, a career school, or university, requires a high school diploma or GED. That is a fact that has to be faced and a step to take. My guess is that if you really want to go-and remember, college is not easy, you will work hard in GED classes and study so you can pass the test and the constitution portion. Then and only then will any college, even if you are paying for it, accept you even conditionally. Without a GED, colleges see you as a risk, an unknown, as someone who does not have the basic skills needed to suceed in the classroom. You, not them, need to show them you have what it takes.

I graduated from one of the top public high schools in the nation many years ago, I was not an honor student, but I was smart. However, I struggled through my first few semesters of college until I learned how to study and after being on academic probation, ended up on the dean's list. But, I worked very hard and still struggled with some courses. Being able to read and write well are absolutely essential to succeeding in college. In a trade school, they probably are not as essential as are the ability to actually do the work-in any vocational or career school. All it takes to succeed in college is a strong work ethic and the willingness to do whatever it takes to succeed. Life will never be easy, anything worth having is worth the effort, blood, sweat, and tears. I graduated with a 2.91 and a 3.35 in my last 1/2 of college-after a quarter with a 1.6 GPA. Professors don't care what your rank in school was, what they want is students who will participate in class, do the assigned work, not distrupt lectures or cause problems for them or other students (who will eat those who make class miserable, for supper-after all they are paying good money), get help when needed, and have some ability to actually understand and do the work. There are many disability services on campuses, but you have to have the proper documentation and meet the ADA standards to qualify.

What do you want to study? That helps people know how to help you.

Your best bet is to talk to the admissions office and see what they require for admission. And go after it if that is your dream. It truly is worth it!

Guest1
08-21-07, 02:55 PM
no i finish high school with speacial diploma a diploma that you cant go to collage with An unequivocval and absolute requirement before they will admit anyone.

Marytza,
I must assume you dropped out of high school? If you are young enough, you could enter a hs degree program or go back to high school. Otherwise, it is time to really put your heart into getting a GED.

To get into college, community college, a career school, or university, requires a high school diploma or GED. That is a fact that has to be faced and a step to take. My guess is that if you really want to go-and remember, college is not easy, you will work hard in GED classes and study so you can pass the test and the constitution portion. Then and only then will any college, even if you are paying for it, accept you even conditionally. Without a GED, colleges see you as a risk, an unknown, as someone who does not have the basic skills needed to suceed in the classroom. You, not them, need to show them you have what it takes.

I graduated from one of the top public high schools in the nation many years ago, I was not an honor student, but I was smart. However, I struggled through my first few semesters of college until I learned how to study and after being on academic probation, ended up on the dean's list. But, I worked very hard and still struggled with some courses. Being able to read and write well are absolutely essential to succeeding in college. In a trade school, they probably are not as essential as are the ability to actually do the work-in any vocational or career school. All it takes to succeed in college is a strong work ethic and the willingness to do whatever it takes to succeed. Life will never be easy, anything worth having is worth the effort, blood, sweat, and tears. I graduated with a 2.91 and a 3.35 in my last 1/2 of college-after a quarter with a 1.6 GPA. Professors don't care what your rank in school was, what they want is students who will participate in class, do the assigned work, not distrupt lectures or cause problems for them or other students (who will eat those who make class miserable, for supper-after all they are paying good money), get help when needed, and have some ability to actually understand and do the work. There are many disability services on campuses, but you have to have the proper documentation and meet the ADA standards to qualify.

What do you want to study? That helps people know how to help you.

Your best bet is to talk to the admissions office and see what they require for admission. And go after it if that is your dream. It truly is worth it!

Crazygirl79
08-21-07, 07:40 PM
Marytza

May I ask what type of LD you have??? and would it be possible if you could get a secondary school diploma that lets you go to college or is there any way you could get to college without that diploma??

Selena

ah09087
09-01-07, 06:57 PM
That sucks I'm sorry. You could try those online deplomas or a GED program. Only problem is both of those cost a little money. Also there is an online school for Public School that I heard of if u wanna re-do your senior year. just a few sugguestions

QueensU_girl
09-01-07, 10:57 PM
I don't understand what your LD is either.

What did your testing show?


Is the problem with auditory (poor auditory memory/attention for what you heard; processing; CAPD)?
Is the problem with visual (poor memory for what you read/see; processing; visual motor; perceptual?
Is it dyslexia?

re: Performance

Is your problem more input or output?
(e.g. taking in the information so you can learn it OR showing on paper that you know what you know)

Crazygirl79
09-03-07, 10:31 PM
Nevertheless a learning impairment especially if it's mild shouldn't be a reason why someone can't go to college.

Selena:)

meadd823
09-04-07, 04:03 AM
In a trade school, they probably are not as essential as are the ability to actually do the work-in any vocational or career school.

The HS diploma or GED is still required for most trades schools / vocational schools especially the schools that offer classes where the students will be tested for licensing or certification. Their ratings are based upon the graduating students who are able to pass such testing so if they do not think you will be able to do such {or able to after slight remediation} then they do not allow admittance . I have attended a few.

I passed the GED I guess because I brought a smart pencil.

Also I lucked out at being old and they did not have the essay thing as a requirement to pas it or I may have never gotten as far a I did.


I also had to take the ACT test to entire vocational school. I passed it but I did have to take some remedial basics {they were between high school level and college} and pass them before I was allowed into regular college courses because my English scores were so low.

I passed over all because my science, social studies and math were high enough to boost my over all score enough to NOT be denied college entry.


I some times wonder what kind of scores I could make now that I can sit long enough to take a test like the SAT without having to consume boones Farm and smoke weed before going. I probably would have flunked the English part any way but I doubt being stoned helped. I am living proof that properly medicated ADD can lead one away from a life of illegal drug use. Why do you think I go after those anti-medication people who claim ADD medication cause drug addiction. . . . .


I thought of going back to college but the idea of all that writing scares me right back into my recycling world besides I am not sure exactly what I want to do because it appears I will never grow up. Now that I finally figured out I am not a complete idiot {several pieces are still missing} I wonder if I could have done more with my life.

meadd823
09-04-07, 04:23 AM
Nevertheless a learning impairment especially if it's mild shouldn't be a reason why someone can't go to college.

Many of us who have learning disabilities are NOT mildly effected. Some like me are severely "impaired" and yes they will keep one out of college. I Probably can not write on a college level even though I am certainly able to read what ever they put in front of me. As long as I can understand 50% of the words I will be able to read and comprehend the material because I use "context" to read as opposed to actual individual word meanings. I have learned to circumvent individual word meaning when it comes to reading how ever being able to understand and spell individual words becomes very necessary when it come to writing them.

Crazygirl79
09-04-07, 05:05 AM
What I meant was that a person should be allowed to go to college regardless whether or not they have a learning disability, I also have mild learning issues such as eye and hand coordination difficulties along with the fact I have significant difficulties with mathematics however on the other hand I don't have any difficulties with reading, writing or spelling in fact I did very well in these subjects at school, so I could probably go to college just as long as I don't enrol in anything requiring great mathematical ability...lol:p

I'm not sure what the system for vocational and college studies is in The States but in Australia there is a learning institution called TAFE and you don't necessarily need a high school certificate to enrol in a course there are also disability support services within the TAFE system as there are in Australian universities, if there is a similar system in The States then maybe Marytza could possibly look into that with the help of sound kind of careers counsellor and if not then I have no idea what she can do.

Selena:)
Many of us who have learning disabilities are NOT mildly effected. Some like me are severely "impaired" and yes they will keep one out of college. I Probably can not write on a college level even though I am certainly able to read what ever they put in front of me. As long as I can understand 50% of the words I will be able to read and comprehend the material because I use "context" to read as opposed to actual individual word meanings. I have learned to circumvent individual word meaning when it comes to reading how ever being able to understand and spell individual words becomes very necessary when it come to writing them.

meadd823
09-05-07, 11:19 PM
I'm not sure what the system for vocational and college studies is in The States but in Australia there is a learning institution called TAFE and you don't necessarily need a high school certificate to enrol in a course there are also disability support services within the TAFE system as there are in Australian universities,

Wow that sounds like a good deal. If there are any trade schools that do no require a high school diploma or GED here in the US I am simply unaware of them. I looked only at attending regular colleges because I was thinking of furthering my nursing career. In all honesty I would be ill informed in current trade school offering. I attended a trade school back in 2001 for drafting classes and certification. I had to have a GED, or HS diploma, They had an entrance exam but I was exempt because I had records indicating previous college credits, ACT scores and a nursing degree.

meadd823
09-05-07, 11:26 PM
What I meant was that a person should be allowed to go to college regardless whether or not they have a learning disability,

Apologies I misunderstood = thanks for the clarification.

I agree having a learning disability should not stop one from attending collage but unfortunately it does. The disability offerings in the US vary widely from school to school. Some school have good services while others are nonexistent except in name and appearance. It really sucks. . . . marytza Australia sound like a more learning disabled friendly country - I am not sure how much different the climate would be from Florida. I think most of the populated areas in Australia are along the shore line. :rolleyes: It doesn't snow there very often from what I hear so Gary might go for a relocating - :p = Gary HATES snow. . . .

Crazygirl79
09-08-07, 05:19 AM
This only applies to certain courses and trades...for others you do need a high school education, however if you don't have a high school education you can enrol as a mature age student.

Selena:) Wow that sounds like a good deal. If there are any trade schools that do no require a high school diploma or GED here in the US I am simply unaware of them. I looked only at attending regular colleges because I was thinking of furthering my nursing career. In all honesty I would be ill informed in current trade school offering. I attended a trade school back in 2001 for drafting classes and certification. I had to have a GED, or HS diploma, They had an entrance exam but I was exempt because I had records indicating previous college credits, ACT scores and a nursing degree.

meadd823
09-08-07, 08:35 AM
at least there are options though which is better than no options at all.

krysta
10-08-07, 01:41 AM
Hi,

It sounds like you need to get your GED. It is very important, even students who graduated from high school with a regular diploma have difficulty succeeding in college. I have heard about the special diplomas you talk about I know there worthless. I am myself, severely dyslexic, ADD, and have a central auditory processing disorder. I have had many people in my life tell me what I cannot do, however I have long since proven them wrong. The 13 year old who could not read is now an honors student in college. However, LD / ADD can't be used as an excuse for students not to have the skills needed for college. Accomodations are suppose to make the curriculum accessible, but not modify the content or requirements. Their are community education programs and community colleges out there that have remedial and GED programs. Even it takes a long time, as long as you keep working and making progress is all that matters. Also, have you thought about looking into your states Department of Disability or Rehabiliation Service. Often they help individuals with learning or physical disabilities find jobs and make affordable and possible, such arranging any services a student may need such as tutors or books on tape. They will sometime pay for a state school, including books, and a local public transporation pass. I could have gone to a state school for free, however the 4 year state school in my state are to large and would not have worked for me, so I go to a small school out of state and have been very successful and plan to go to grad school.