View Full Version : Multiple things.


KellyD
07-03-07, 09:40 PM
My son is ADHD and has mild Asperger's but I always wonder if there's a hidden LD.

He's above average in spelling, reading comprehension and decoding, written language and listening comprehension is also above average.

As far as mathematics he's at grade level but with math facts it's a struggle, he counts on his hands sometimes for addition and subtraction but as far as multiplication if you verbally test him he can barely answer the questions, he seems to get mixed up but if you give him a sheet a paper that's random (for instance the 3 times table), mostly he gets them and some by memory and some by his fingers and some by seeing if he already answered, lol, but you can see the difference.

For spelling we tried reading them in Grade 1 and that didn't work but then in grade 2 he tried writing them out as many times as the line would fit and now he gets 100% the majority of the time.

He had CCAT testing and he scored above average in Verbal, high average for Non Verbal and Mid Average for Quantative.

He needs to know up to 9x9 for grade 4 and we are barely past 6x. Any idea if this is a Learning Disability? Or does it relate to the ADHD? Or does anyone know what type of learner he is?

I'm looking for ideas and thoughts.

EDIT: To add, if you ask him to remember something that the teacher explained for homework, usually he doesn't remember, he has to write things in his agenda.

speedo
07-03-07, 10:54 PM
Aspies like to think in concrete terms. Things that are abstracted might be hard for him.

What might help is if he can find a way to visualize the problem so that he can apply some rule or theory to it.

Teach him to create a multiplication table

If he can spot a pattern in it he might just take off with it and maybe will do better.


just a thought...

Me :D

Crazy~Feet
07-03-07, 11:14 PM
Yea I am a visual/spatial type myself, and find that writing anything at all, in my handwriting, helps me to process things. Sometimes I pick up patterns there that others might not see, and those also help me learn and remember. Like I put my times tables to music?

QueensU_girl
07-04-07, 12:32 AM
Auditory memory problems (remembering what he was told to do for HOMEWORK) sounds ADHD or auditory LD.

Teachers of LD/ADHD kids are supposed to write it down on the board.

He could also be high functioning Autism. Some really bright people have that. (e.g. Temple Grandin did her Ph.D. & teaches at University.)

Imnapl
07-04-07, 03:09 AM
from: http://72.14.253.104/search?q=cache:3KRZj3vNlgQJ:www.grandin.com/inc/mind.web.browser.html+temple+grandin+%2Bmultiplica tion&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=1&gl=ca

In school, math was a tough subject for me. Finding the precisely correct answer is difficult because I mix up numbers. On the other hand, I am very good at proportional thinking, coming up with an accurate approximate answer.

Imnapl
07-04-07, 03:23 AM
from: http://www.dyscalculia.org/

Inability to grasp and remember math concepts, rules, formulas, sequence (order of operations), and basic addition, subtraction, multiplication and division facts. Poor long term memory (retention & retrieval) of concept mastery- may be able to perform math operations one day, but draw a blank the next! May be able to do book work but fails all tests and quizzes. http://www.dyscalculia.org/globeS.gif

KellyD
07-04-07, 03:52 PM
from: http://www.dyscalculia.org/

Inability to grasp and remember math concepts, rules, formulas, sequence (order of operations), and basic addition, subtraction, multiplication and division facts. Poor long term memory (retention & retrieval) of concept mastery- may be able to perform math operations one day, but draw a blank the next! May be able to do book work but fails all tests and quizzes. http://www.dyscalculia.org/globeS.gifHe doesn't fail tests but he doesn't do well during "timed" tests like mad minutes.

He can do math facts (addition/subtraction) but takes him longer to remember. Requires constant work on them.

KellyD
07-04-07, 03:54 PM
We are trialing music but also we are just doing 1 page of facts over and over again, (ie 4x table) hoping after doing it so often it will stick, similar to what he does in spelling.

Yea I am a visual/spatial type myself, and find that writing anything at all, in my handwriting, helps me to process things. Sometimes I pick up patterns there that others might not see, and those also help me learn and remember. Like I put my times tables to music?

Vickie
07-05-07, 11:59 AM
Timed tests were horrible for my youngest. She could not get enough problems done to pass, but every problem she completed was correct. She is strongly visual/spatial and although memorizing the facts was hard (actually retrieving them during a test was the hard part), she understands complicated math functions easily. Her IEP allowed her to take her math tests untimed. She was given a normal pencil and a colored pencil. During the timed part, she would do the test in the colored pencil and when the time was up, she would continue with the normal pencil. With time, she could get more and more done in the timed part, until she passed the tests.

Tricks and tips:

Skip counting can get the 2s, 3s, 5s and 10s.
4s are just doubling the 2s and 6s are just doubling the 3s

More (including a neat finger method for 9s):
http://www.multiplication.com/teach.htm (bottom left box)

Some more patterns:
http://www.abcteach.com/free/m/mulitplication_quicktricks_elem.pdf

A couple more tricks:
1, 2, 3, 4..... 12=3x4
5, 6, 7, 8..... 56=7x8

There are many games on the internet to play for practice.

KellyD
07-05-07, 01:21 PM
More (including a neat finger method for 9s):
http://www.multiplication.com/teach.htm (bottom left box)

Oh for goodness sakes, I just tried it and yes it works lol go figure.

As for an IEP we switched from public to catholic so I am working on getting one but I'm first trying to get an psychoeducational assessment first. I'm convinced he may have a LD but not everyone agrees so this is the best route by far.

Thanks for the links.