View Full Version : Low Non-Verbal intelligence


mrsmith
07-14-07, 06:24 AM
My non-verbal intelligence is relatively low. Does that correspond to a LD?
I don't think it is the same NLD/NVLD Non-Verbal Learning Disorder.
Generally looking for "adult" info on my condition.

Background: There are 3 main areas of intelligence. "Verbal" (Left-hemisphere), where I am very high. Visual-spatial (right-hemisphere) where I am also high. And Non-Verbal where i am just a bit above average. Non-verbal is a bit about using the two others and the two hemispheres together, and my problem is a bit about using the hemispheres together.

(So it is not about everything non-verbal beeing low).

Valentine

QueensU_girl
07-14-07, 10:37 AM
People with LD have a large discrepancy between Verbal IQ and Performance IQ.

I can't recall what tests are included in VIQ and PIQ.

You would have to see your Raw Score Data. (Psychologists tend to guard this quite jealously.)

The discrepancy has to be quite wide -- like 20 points, etc.

Have you asked your Psychologist/Tester to Explain his/her Raw Datato you In Detail?

NVLD people usually have intense social problems. They have extremely low "EQ"; can't understand jokes or metaphor, etc.

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How were your executive function scores?

mrsmith
07-14-07, 01:57 PM
[QUOTE=QueensU_girl]People with LD have a large discrepancy between Verbal IQ and Performance IQ.
I can't recall what tests are included in VIQ and PIQ.
You would have to see your Raw Score Data. (Psychologists tend to guard this quite jealously.)
The discrepancy has to be quite wide -- like 20 points, etc.
/QUOTE]
PIQ 104. VIQ 125 (And it is assumed that it is actually higher because I was not tested in my first language).

About social skills, there are some issues, but not only bad, and it is difficult to say wath is groving up with a kind of ADD and not the best environment)

mctavish23
07-14-07, 09:10 PM
The term NonVerbal Learning Disability (NVLD) has been around for some time now.

While there is no specific DSM IV TR diagnosis by that name, nor has there ever been, it does receive widespread acceptance clinically.

The thing you ( as a consumer of psychological services) and clinicians have to be careful of in this regard is to focus too much on this one aspect ( or any one particular aspect) in trying to understand ADHD.

I've said this before, but diagnosing ADHD correctly (i.e.,using only evidence based (research supported) questions & issues that actually work in the real world) is like putting a puzzle together in the dark.

There are so many variables to consider that unless you read the research so you know what actually works and what doesn't, it's easy to get off track.

For example, comorbid conditions demand that the clinician know which disorders commomly go with ADHD, as well as being able to differentiate between the two.

For ADHD, one of the most common and yet overlooked parts of the disorder itself are motor coordination deficits.

Russell Barkley expresses that point well on page 19 of his ADHD pesentation from 2000,;available at SchwabLearning.org.

What he says is this :

"We have known for years that motor coordination deficits are part of ADHD. They're not just some comorbid learning disabiity. They are part of this disorder.Why does ADHD interfere with with fine motor sequencing ( mctavish23:this is what the Performance IQ (PIQ) is assessing) , which it does? Why? That's as much a part of ADHD as the impulsiveness is."

He goes on to expalin that ADHD disrupts fine motor sequencing, of which the best example is handwriting.

The biggest reason that this deficit is largely overlooked as part of the disorder is the inconsistent nature of ADHD.

In other words, "one day we get it and one day we don't;" as the disorder fluctuates across settings.

The other important point to remember is that the up to 50% of children with ADHD have Learning Disabilities.

That's why you have to screen for them. However, ADHD remains the primary problem.

A good example would be all the ADHD kids I see with an LD IEP, who are failing at least one subject.

The reason goes back to a lack if understanding of ADHD related Executive Function impairments not being a "choice" the student is making.

This is a fascinating subject that I could go on about but it's easier if you just go to SchwabLearning.org and read it for yourself.

My suggestions on how to apply this to your child are :

1) Learn as much as you can about the science behind the disorder,so you can be a more effective advocate and;

2) Consider an Occupational Therapy consultation ( OUTSIDE of school). OT works wonders to help address fine motor coordination deficits, which in turn, improve sel-esteem.

tc

mctavish23
(Robert)