View Full Version : GTD - getting things done David Allen


cg1978
07-18-07, 03:44 PM
Has anyone successfully implemented and is currently using the GTD methodology?

I am stuck on finding a "Trusted System". I keep looking at different software packages and paper ways to do GTD but I keep finding cracks or holes in them all.

One of the most import things in the GTD methodology is having a system you can TRUST!



Has anyone found a trusted system?

traveler
07-24-07, 01:24 AM
Is currently using, yes -- whether I call it "successful" depends on the mood I'm in. I don't recall where I saw it, perhaps here, but someone mentioned that for ADD the goal shouldn't be perfect organization, but "well-enough organized". That mantra has helped me get away from perfectionism.

I have all sorts of personalized tweaks on the system, which is part of my advice right there: experiment, figure out what works for you, realizing it'll never be fully "there". But the cornerstone of my Trusted System is a little book like a paper planner, but with custom-designed sheets I print out on the laser printer. One of my favorite adjustments is sheets of lined paper with a little tagging-column on the left:

I can dump notes on these sheets as in a GTD-Inbox, then scan them through that flowchart technique. If they're short I do them right away and check them off on the left. But if they need categorization, rather than recopying into a project file or whatever, I give them tagging symbols for context (at work, at home, errand, needs computer access, etc.) as well as priority and all sorts of other stuff. It seems like a little thing, but for me, having the jot-notes Inbox unified with the To-Do list ended up being a major improvement.

HTH

P.S.
These were an inspiration in setting up my system...
http://www.pocketmod.com/
http://www.diyplanner.com/
http://www.43folders.com/2004/09/03/introducing-the-hipster-pda/

njtrout
07-25-07, 08:17 PM
I've looked at it...might be fun setting up then I'll get bored. Alot of those systems have you limit your to-do' to 3 per day. At that rate I'll never get anything done. Then there is the intergration with corporate e-mail.

I've settled on a 8 1/2 X 11 spiral bound notebook (highest quality at Staples) to keep all my notes in. Anything I need to do or follow-up on I place an asterisk next to it in the left margin.

I also use a smaller notebook to jot things in that are not work related. Life goes on even during the days when I am at work so keeping notes helps.

Added to that an 8 1/2 X 11 pad of lined paper for my To Do's. The real ones. I just cross off when done. Next day I start a new page and move all the previous days unfinished to the new page.

I am also using a pretty nifty program called Evernote. I'm using the free version, but thinking of upgrading to the pay version soon. It is a PC based notepad with plenty of logic allowing you to categorize, cut and paste automatically from your Web browser and Outlook. Very customizable. Go to www.evernote.com (http://www.evernote.com)

Let's talk more about this.

NJTrout

MonkeyK
09-10-07, 09:29 PM
I'll second Evernote. I made a move to try and do GTD, found Evernote met most of my needs in this regard, got obsessive about it for a while and now just use it regularly for weekly and daily plans.

It's a great tool.

njtrout
10-02-07, 08:36 PM
I wish I opened Evernote more often. I'm struggling with finding a system that is works for me. I loose thoughts and ideas as fast as they enter my mind. By the time I realize I should write something down, find the pen and paper I have know idea what I was thinking. I have a digital recorder, but never have anything to say into it. I really need a totally integrated system. I might try Dragon Naturally Speaking though I have to save up for it. But then I need the computer always around....ugh!

NNTrout

I'll second Evernote. I made a move to try and do GTD, found Evernote met most of my needs in this regard, got obsessive about it for a while and now just use it regularly for weekly and daily plans.

It's a great tool.

sputnik
12-15-07, 09:08 PM
I'm using the Mac application iGTD, and plan on transfering to Omnifocus. Basically, it's a bunch of small tasks, ordered by projects and subprojects. Tasks are also categorized by context. So I can work on a project, such as 'write a project proposal', which consists of, for example 10 tasks, including 'ask my boss about the goals of the project' and 'research topic X' and 'wait for input to be provided by colleague Y". All individual tasks are categorised by context as well. A context could be 'on the phone', or 'boss' (everything that I need to discuss with my boss") or "shop" (everything I need to buy at a shop). When I want to work on a project, I look at the actions that need be taken (the tasks), and work on the first one. When I'm going to the shop, I just look at the 'shop' context to find every item that I need to buy. When I'm going to talk with my boss, I can get a list of all things I need to discuss with him (for all projects that have tasks with the 'boss' context), etc.
I keep my email inbox empty. I deal with mail right a way, I delete it, or I archive it; if an action remains to be done, I place a task in iGTD.
When I'm on the road without my laptop and I think of something I should do, I record a voice memo or write it down. Every morning, I collect all those things and place them in my iGTD inbox as well.
If something needs to be done at a specific time or date, I place it in my calendar (iCal), and set up a reminder.

I have trouble really using it effectively; I am a chronic procrastinator and never have time for the weekly review. But it helps anyway.

Xero
01-27-08, 05:23 PM
cool info guys. Is it worth doing the gtd course or buying the book?

wilford
03-04-08, 07:58 PM
A bit of a warning about Dragon Natually speaking. I long for the day that a computer and I can talk as an effective work-around to the confusion that keyboards and multiple/different programs evoke. We ain't there yet technologically and Dragon is probably the best. The training alone can tax the concentration and patience of an incredibly focused person and by the time you work on the Dragon speech to text corrections, those essential trains of thought are history. For me, when memory goes down, so too does finding the proper command in a program and Dragon definitely doesn't go through those well-- speech to text is its forte.

I'VE GONE PAPERLESS-- yes paperless with the use of a scanner and Microsoft OneNote. After realizing that paper filing was just out of reach in terms of organizing and remembering my system, OneNote has largely solved the problem. No paper hanging around to irritate me and it works seamlessly with every Office program. It also syncs to Microsoft Mobile hand held devices. This is not an add for Microsoft-- I love my ipod and everything I hear about macs. I'm just saying that OneNote, because of its seemless integration, is the best thing around that I've found to get rid of the clutter.

I wish I opened Evernote more often. I'm struggling with finding a system that is works for me. I loose thoughts and ideas as fast as they enter my mind. By the time I realize I should write something down, find the pen and paper I have know idea what I was thinking. I have a digital recorder, but never have anything to say into it. I really need a totally integrated system. I might try Dragon Naturally Speaking though I have to save up for it. But then I need the computer always around....ugh!

NNTrout

easye
03-07-08, 10:59 AM
I have been using GTD and am still working on my trusted system.

I really think this trusted system (i.e. one place to put all ur stuff and one place to go look for what you need to) is such an IMPORTANT thing for us ADD'ers. Making lists is something I've always heard is good for ADD'ers. Well, I came upon this long before I knew I had ADD. Problem is, I would create lists for everything and have lists on sticky notes, scrap paper, full 8.5x11 paper, and notebooks. Then these would get lost on my desk, in my back pocket, in various piles of papers, etc. etc. So this didn't work too well :D. That's why I think the one, trusted system is key.

Anyway, my current system is:
Tasks, appointments, contacts are kept in Outlook on my PC (there are great resources on the web on how to set this up for GTD).
I also have a Treo that I sync with the above. I can enter any of this information there and it will all stay in sync. I've been a long time user of PDA's so this is really key to me. And it's nice to have your phone and pda in one device.
For those thoughts, idea, to-do's that come up when I can't easily get them into the above I record a voice note to myself on my Treo. This message is then automatically sent to my email account. (this is an inexpensive application called Note2Self - www.webis.net (http://www.webis.net)). BTW, could also use Jott (www.jott.com (http://www.jott.com)) for this.
I am a heavy and enthusiastic user of EverNote. I put all notes, thoughts, web research, anything that would end up on scrap pieces of paper, etc. This makes it very easy to search and find this info. BTW, EverNote now has beta versions for Windows Mobile as well as a Web version. So this product is going to be getting even better soon.
Carry a Moleskine notebook with me to take any notes, thoughts, etc.
I also have a couple of filing cabinets that I try to maintain.This has worked OK for me, but I do have some difficulties with it now and then. I'm still in the process of getting it to work for me. I only found out I had ADD recently and have been on meds for just over a month, so I'm hoping that will help.

Here are the current issues I'm having:
Making sure to do the weekly review. It's great to have all this information in these various places, but unless you do the weekly review (an important part of GTD), then things can get "lost". For me, if I don't see things I tend to forget about them. So, if I put a task into this system, unless I keep doing the weekly review, I'll forget about it :(.
Prioritizing tasks. GTD doesn't include (and from what I understand, doesn't think you should include) priorities in your to-do list. The problem I'm having is that I've captured so many to-do's that when I look over my lists, I'm not sure where to start. Part of the problem on this is that I'm not doing the weekly review as much as I should. But, even with that, I still think I will need to include some sort of prioritization.
I've tried to keep my email in-box empty (http://www.43folders.com/izero), but up to now, have been unsuccessful with it. I think this is very important so that things don't end up slipping though the cracks.Anyway, that's it for now. I was only planning on writing a quick post and then coming back to it later. But I got a little carried away :).

For those not familiar with GTD, everything I typed above may seem "over the top" or very difficult. But, it's actually not. And once you have it set up, it makes many things easier.

easye
03-07-08, 11:08 AM
I wish I opened Evernote more often. I'm struggling with finding a system that is works for me.

I have EverNote open automatically every time I start Windows (in Windows 2000 and XP just put a link to Evernote in your Startup folder).

I loose thoughts and ideas as fast as they enter my mind. By the time I realize I should write something down, find the pen and paper I have know idea what I was thinking.

Check out a post I made above about how I capture these thoughts in my Treo. If you don't have a Treo, or similar, a very nice solution I've used before is Jott (www.jott.com). Jott is a free service. When you sign up they give your own toll free number. When you call it, you can leave a message to yourself and they will automatically send it to your email, text message, etc. What I did was to put my Jott toll free number as a quick dial on my cell phone. Then if I had an idea, I would just press 9 on my phone, it would automatically call Jott, I'd record my message, and then it would be waiting for me in my email next time I accessed it.

BTW, Jott has many, many other cool features.

easye
03-07-08, 11:11 AM
I'VE GONE PAPERLESS-- yes paperless with the use of a scanner and Microsoft OneNote. After realizing that paper filing was just out of reach in terms of organizing and remembering my system, OneNote has largely solved the problem. No paper hanging around to irritate me and it works seamlessly with every Office program. It also syncs to Microsoft Mobile hand held devices. This is not an add for Microsoft-- I love my ipod and everything I hear about macs. I'm just saying that OneNote, because of its seemless integration, is the best thing around that I've found to get rid of the clutter.

Once you scan the papers into OneNote, can you then search the text of those notes? Or do you have to follow up and put keywords, titles, categories, etc. to be able to find it?

I'm a heavy user of EverNote, but haven't used OneNote. EverNote (the paid version) has a feature where it actually will look through the scanned pages, attempt to recognize your words, and indexes those words so can search on them. I'm just starting to do this myself. It's not perfect - it doesn't recognize all my scribbles. But it is surprisingly good.

Retromancer
02-14-09, 06:19 AM
Are there any poor low-tech ADDers out there that are working through the GTD system out there? (My portable tech consists of a jump drive and a notepad...)

gnbeg
02-15-09, 10:36 AM
Are there any poor low-tech ADDers out there that are working through the GTD system out there? (My portable tech consists of a jump drive and a notepad...)

I am trying to use the GTD system. I'm not low tech (I use "Things" on my Macbook and iPhone to capture/manage to-do's and lists). I'm struggling to use the system as intended - I am better at capturing thoughts as they occur. I'm just not running them through the "system". e.g. Can it be done in 2 minutes?

This is par for the course for me and one of my big frustrations. I just seem to struggle to go that extra level of effort to really internalize a process like GTD.

Anyway, what I'm doing right now is helping.

Retromancer
02-15-09, 05:36 PM
Please note that I am "low tech" because I am poor. I am unemployed now and at best I have another low paying service sector job ahead of me. I do not have money to purchase the latest in hand held digital toys.

Right now I am looking for a clean used copy of "GTD". This is where my budget is at...

I am trying to use the GTD system. I'm not low tech (I use "Things" on my Macbook and iPhone to capture/manage to-do's and lists). I'm struggling to use the system as intended - I am better at capturing thoughts as they occur. I'm just not running them through the "system". e.g. Can it be done in 2 minutes?

This is par for the course for me and one of my big frustrations. I just seem to struggle to go that extra level of effort to really internalize a process like GTD.

Anyway, what I'm doing right now is helping.

firstdesserts
02-15-09, 05:54 PM
Have you done the library thing? Writing out helpful ideas by hand are low tech but also help to remember. I have almost the best in tech (just not up to date) but I'm putting something together to go back to paper.

To ADD is human. But if you want to really screw me up, add a computer!

Retromancer
02-15-09, 06:35 PM
Have you done the library thing?

As far as acquiring a copy of 'GTD'? A paperback copy of my own would be more useful -- so I could underline it etc. Right now I am referring back to various on-line synopsis that are available. (Lifehacker et al).
As far as tech is concerned I have a trusty second-hand Dell tower that I purchased last year. That is it for my IT hardware budget. (I rely on dial-up to get out to the world. 52K forever!) I use the helpful online Toodledo to-do list.

Writing out helpful ideas by hand are low tech but also help to remember. I have almost the best in tech (just not up to date) but I'm putting something together to go back to paper.The crucial insight in the GTD system that I can see is the necessity of writing down what ever comes to mind as it comes to you. When I am away from the desktop computer that means writing it down in a small pocket notebook.
I made a resolution this year that if I was going to accomplish one thing this year it was to put some type of "to do" system in place. I have bad tendency to "lock up". It feels like I have so much to do and it all seems to need to be done now. In response I often end up putting everything on hold and find some type of displacement activity -- like logging in to this forum!

gnbeg
02-15-09, 11:53 PM
The GTD system can definitely be done "low tech". As for the book, the 1st half is the system, the 2nd is implementing. If the stuff on the internet accurately describes the system, then that is really what you need to understand. True to my ADHD, I've only read the 1st half of the book. But I have listed to the whole thing as an audio book.

Retro... good luck. It is helpful to me. And, I actually did the process way before I figured out how to use my Mac and iPhone. I bought 3x5 perforated wire bound note stacks. I kept one with me where ever I went. This was my "inbox". Whenever I had a thought that needed to be tracked, I would write it down on a 3x5. Then, I'd "file it" according to GTD later. I found the true value was writing down thoughts as soon as I had them. I never have completely integrated the "filing" process of GTD.

firstdesserts
02-16-09, 12:26 AM
Retromancer: It feels like I have so much to do and it all seems to need to be done now. In response I often end up putting everything on hold and find some type of displacement activity -- like logging in to this forum!

Yesssir! Been there, done that! Someone (else) oughta start a thread, "What are you s'posed to be doing besides being here!":o

RobConcept
02-16-09, 07:17 PM
Retro, check this link out. - http://www.lifeclever.com/the-amazing-pocket-tickler-system/

It's an analogue alternative to the digital GTD systems that exist. The best thing is that the vibrating clock can be replaced with a wristwatch w/ alarm, and the pocket briefcase/index card holder can be replaced with a notebook.

The biggest difference between digital and analogue GTD systems is the reliance on self discipline. Digital bombards you with reminders, where as analogue is easy to put down and ignore.

Another great thing mentioned in this article is the concept of your three "Must Do's" for the day - it's becoming a fairly mainstream idea, and has been great for 1000s of people around the world who want to make sure that what they achieve during the day has weighting, and isn't "just another task".

Hope this all helps!

Ethereal
02-16-09, 07:29 PM
I've tried GTD, but it wasn't the right solution for me- for an example, I need a daily to-do-list.

Other books about organizing, especially those aimed at people with ADD (Like "The Disorganized Mind) have helped me a lot more.

mctavish23
02-16-09, 09:23 PM
I use a timer everyday.

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

timtam
02-16-09, 10:38 PM
i have found this GTD application useful. it's called ThinkingRock: http://www.trgtd.com.au/

mijahe
02-17-09, 03:02 AM
Has anyone successfully implemented and is currently using the GTD methodology?

GTD is a fantastic methodology. The good thing about it is: It provides the framework for you to enable you to organize yourself. It doesn't dictate whether to use this or that software, or this or that 'diary'.

David says that a whiteboard is good enough.... but...

As an ADD geek, I tend to lean towards software.
So, my primary requirements for the best software to use were:
* Accessible anywhere, (work, home, on the go).
* Very easy to update.
* Multi-user - my wife can add things to my list of things to do.

After a fair amount of searching I settled on taskfreak (http://taskfreak.com/), but instead of using their server, I loaded up my own website with the software, (open source goodness).

It meets all my requirements, (its' the fastest GTD software to add or update tasks I've seen), except it has a few things I'd like to see:
* Dependancies: Sometimes I have a list of things I need to do, but I'd like to do them in a particular order. Or a large task needs to be broken down into smaller sub-tasks.
* Breaking up a task: I want to break down a large 'thing' into smaller things easily. If I have created a task and I end up stuffing 20 sub-tasks into the 'comment field'.

mijahe
02-17-09, 03:04 AM
I went through this some time back. Have a look at this post:
http://www.addforums.com/forums/showpost.php?p=433479&postcount=6

Quite a few of these are based on GTD.

I've updated the links just recently, (around a month ago). A fair amount has
changed since my original post.
http://onut.net/tools/sitebar/index.php?w=dir&flat=1&root=901

Retromancer
02-25-09, 04:21 PM
Broke down and bought the book. Now I just need to work through it.

Downloading fat files is why we po' folks have jump drives. I pull mine out of the dock and head down to the public library when I need a download.

If you were to go to a site like mininova I believe you may be able to download an audiobook/seminar, though it may take a while to download on your 56k MODEM: -

http://www.mininova.org/tor/1030028

You could also get the book: -

http://www.mininova.org/tor/2133833

HTH

withnail
02-26-09, 08:24 AM
GTD has been life changing for me and once you really start to get into it, you'll wonder why you bothered with your old methods - David Allen call's it advanced common sense.

I use both a computer based system combined with paper based.

There are a few things I would bear in mind when you start with GTD.

1. The book is very dry, it took me two attempts to read it, I put it down for two months. Then when I had a week off I read it cover to cover in 3 days.
At first the book might bore you death, try and stick with it. The real shame I think is David Allen seems to be a very charismatic and funny guy, this doesn’t really come across in the book. Though this does translate in the audio seminars and videos.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qo7vUdKTlhk

2. If you implement it and it goes well for you for the first week / two weeks then you fall off the wagon, don't berate or beat yourself up about it. It takes a lot to break your old habits and your brain is used to keeping your stuff. Simply remember that what you did to have that one good day/week/month is a easily repeatable process and you can get back in control easily, as you did the first time.

3. It takes practice to get good, the more you use GTD the more you'll find yourself trusting in it more and more and it will become easier.

GTD and the ADD link
http://www.davidco.com/coaches_corner/Meg_Edwards/article17.html

Best of luck!

naropa8
06-05-09, 03:36 PM
It really is. I have been using GTD for a couple months now. It seems like a lot of work to maintain, but is it really more work than having to find missing documents, or apologizing for missed meetings.

Schroeder
06-16-09, 11:29 PM
GTD works, but the problem is it's hard to get going for people with ADHD. I had the system for roughly 2 years before I actually put it to use (audiobook + paperback book). I loved the idea of it, but ADHD being what it is, it was just difficult to get going on it.

As far as the implementation goes, I do the low-tech version. Digital stuff is just too hard. I've tried PDAs and cell phones, I've tried my iPhone, I've tried the Omnifocus app for iPhone, I've tried computer apps. In the end, the paper system just works the best - scribbling something down quickly with a pen is infinitely faster than doing it on some little gadget for me.

Also, you have to take a smaller approach with the giant "next action" lists. Half of the problem is trying to select an activity from a big list. It's just too overwhelming if you have ADHD. Only carry around a list of 4 or 5 things you actually want to get done that day.

Also, do all the stuff he says. Setup your own desk, with good lighting, and those file drawers he talks about. If you don't setup the system, it just isn't going to work. It's as simple as that. If you want his results, you have to follow his procedure. I tend to think that HE has ADHD, but the problem is the book isn't formatted for people with ADHD. All of the information is in there, but it's difficult to from a mental standpoint. For example, he talks about using a portable labeling device ($14.99 at Staples), but to get one that is A/C powered instead of battery-powered so that you never run out of power, and to get a big pile of cartridges so that you never run out of ink/tape. All this stuff is genius, it's just very hard to approach if you are already struggling with ADHD.

firstdesserts
06-17-09, 01:36 PM
Meg Edwards:
"GTD and the ADD link"
http://www.davidco.com/coaches_corner/Meg_Edwards/article17.html (http://www.davidco.com/coaches_corner/Meg_Edwards/article17.html)

Writes Ms. Edwards: "GTD is, in essence, learned executive function."

Executive function is used to describe various activites of the frontal cortex of the brain in Dr. Thomas Brown's "Attention Deficit Disorder: the unfocused mind in children and adults".

Has anyone else read this? What do you think? After a lot of studying ADD and related material, "learning" executive function has been my goal. I am finding it a tough, dry, rocky, and dusty road on my own, though.

Schroeder
06-17-09, 02:29 PM
Meg Edwards:
"GTD and the ADD link"
http://www.davidco.com/coaches_corner/Meg_Edwards/article17.html (http://www.davidco.com/coaches_corner/Meg_Edwards/article17.html)

Writes Ms. Edwards: "GTD is, in essence, learned executive function."

Executive function is used to describe various activites of the frontal cortex of the brain in Dr. Thomas Brown's "Attention Deficit Disorder: the unfocused mind in children and adults".

Has anyone else read this? What do you think? After a lot of studying ADD and related material, "learning" executive function has been my goal. I am finding it a tough, dry, rocky, and dusty road on my own, though.

Oh, it's horrible to learn. But the payoffs are fabulous:

-never forget an appointment again
-never again drop the ball on a project because you forgot
-makes it easier to sleep at night because you don't have all those things you forgot to do running through your mind
-not have that nagging feeling in your mind that there's something you still need to do, but you can't remember what it was
-unstructured approach to doing action-items - instead of priorities and schedules, you simply pick the next action of whatever task is most appropriate for your current context (location & situation) and energy level
-eliminates being scatter-brained when it comes to figuring out which task to do - because you write down EVERYTHING IN YOUR LIFE and store it
-be completely organized with your papers and to-do's

One of the biggest benefits for me personally was getting 100% of the stuff OFF MY BRAIN. I always had an "I need to do this" or an "I need to do that" swirling around my brain, all the time, every day! This puts it into a trusted system instead of scribbled in your notebook, on a piece of paper in your pocket, on your portable device, in your email, in notepad, wherever - instead it lets you be 100% organized.

The thing I like about it is that he clearly defines every single aspect of the workflow. There's nothing left to chance and you don't have to guess how to do anything. As long as you follow all the procedures (I printed them out and taped them to my desk), you will get the same results. It's completely bulletproof. But again, it's difficult for a person with ADD to learn. There's only 5 steps in the workflow, but learning a whole book's worth of material to implement it is NOT an easy task. I had the system for a couple years before I actually did anything with it. But the payoffs are great.

GTD is like our version of a wheelchair. If your legs don't work, you can either sit around and do nothing, or you can get a wheelchair and move on. GTD allows you to deal with your problem in such a way that you are still successful, but you have to use a "crutch" to help you along. It's a great crutch though - I'm now more organized than anyone I've ever met, haha.

HTH :D

firstdesserts
06-17-09, 03:49 PM
It's completely bulletproof.

...But like the vest you've gotta remember to use it without putting it off 'til tomorrow. I had the "First Things First" (Covey) method down since it first came out (back in the olden days). I just couldn't get myself to do anything much with it.

I read through a mess of excellent material on procrastination over the past couple of months while my copy of GTD sat waiting to be read. I doubt I would have gotten as far as I have with the book without doing so. I cannot afford to hesitate to get getting things done. There comes a time when too late is too late. For me it may already be.

mijahe
06-22-09, 06:20 PM
GTD works, but the problem is it's hard to get going for people with ADHD. I had the system for roughly 2 years before I actually put it to use (audiobook + paperback book).
Actually I found a different experience. After 40 years of chaos, and going through almost every single "How to organize your life" theories, this was a blessing.

I got right into it, because I could instantly see the simplification of the organizing process. GTD is also "getting off the rails" aware, and has a process for getting back on track.

So, in essence, it's a perfect solution for ADHD.

However, YMMV.
:)

MikeE11
09-08-09, 05:03 PM
Answering an unanswered question and bringing this topic back as it's something I think would help folks once they get into doing. Even just starting with the simplist part of carrying around a notepad and pen to jot down tasks, thoughts, items you need ect has helped me a great deal. Instead of my head full of things that I would either not allow me to think as I tried to keep track of them all or I would forget and never remember them again until some point in the future where I'm reminded again.

Once you scan the papers into OneNote, can you then search the text of those notes? Or do you have to follow up and put keywords, titles, categories, etc. to be able to find it?


Yes indeed and one of the reasons I love OneNote (gotta figure out how to get a copy as I no longer have access to the one at my old work). It does OCR (optical character recognition) on the text in the image, even hand written, and allows you to search it. :)


I'm a heavy user of EverNote, but haven't used OneNote. EverNote (the paid version) has a feature where it actually will look through the scanned pages, attempt to recognize your words, and indexes those words so can search on them. I'm just starting to do this myself. It's not perfect - it doesn't recognize all my scribbles. But it is surprisingly good.
Great to hear, sounds like a great product as well and I'll have to look it up.

lcalvin
04-26-10, 03:59 AM
I use Evernote too and it's been helping me a lot. The customized feature also is a nifty idea. On another note, I'd to share one website for those who at one point or another had a hard time getting around the complexity of GDT.

It's http://www.weeklyreviewexpert.com


At first, I personnally had a hard time taking in all the ideas from GTD. But they really helped me take in accountability and really made feel they're concern in helping me. GTD was quite complex for me in the begining but after I checked the website, I truly got so much help from the difficulty and confusion I was going through. Hope that helps :)

lcalvin
04-26-10, 04:33 AM
I agree on Evernote. The customize feature is also a nifty idea. I'd also like to suggest you check out www.WeeklyReviewExpert.com. This site really taught me so much on accountability and I really felt the concern in helping me. I was truly perplex with all the ideas with GTD process and I could say the site
made me work out the confusion. So for some people who are going through the same dillema of complexity surrounding the subject of GTD, the website would really be worth checking out.

Hope this helps.

Schroeder
04-27-10, 07:21 PM
I also switched to Evernote. Endless folders + search = win.