View Full Version : Keys to College Success


livinginchaos
08-20-07, 01:22 AM
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Here is a GREAT outline/list of KEYS TO COLLEGE SUCCESS.
I wanted to post the entire article in here,but I kept getting a "too many images" error. So, unfortunately, I must give you the link.




http://www.rong-chang.com/collsucc.htm


After you've read it . . . tell everyone what you think!!
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roneydapony
10-29-07, 11:23 PM
I want to put this on my wall!
I really like the idea of 30-3-2- for studying. I can't focus for more than 20-30 minutes but then I get so distracted. Also, check in with your Office of Disability Services if it exists. Get your accomodation info squared away stat and make a connection with the ODS people. If you have accomodations USE THEM, at least at first! Also, my school has an ADHD/ADD networking group, free food, awesome company and people who get the way you think. I've never seen more people fidget in a meeting :-P
For papers, I'm terrible about getting stuff in on time.. I make meetings with professors so I can go over my paper progress and bring drafts to them. It forces me to write something down.

there was something else I wanted to say but I forgot! hehe. But yeah this article is pretty on point, and gave me some nice ideas... oh yeah, schedule more time than you need to study, if you're going to study for two hours schedule three.. and suposidly the best time to study is the hour before and the hour after class (hehe anyone that can do that, props. i can't!!!!!)

This board is awesome

Jpalmer
12-10-08, 02:04 PM
This is helpful thanks

DTownDave22
12-19-08, 04:05 PM
Wow..when I first opened the page, I read it from the beginning and thought "Wow..there's not that much there, but this is still useful"..then I noticed it kept going and going.....info overload for me!!

I will defintely check this out in more detail. I am really looking forward to next semester and I think it would probably be a good idea to practice these methods over break!

Much thanks.

livinginchaos
12-20-08, 01:26 AM
I know what you mean! I find that longer articles, especially in black and white coloring, are really hard for me to read.

It was easier for me to read once I highlighted the paragraphs/sentences/sections or put up a rose colored transparency.
Only then did I get through it all.

WarPhalange
12-21-08, 02:22 AM
I like how I fail that on the very first sentence. I don't take notes. At all. :P

DTownDave22
12-21-08, 10:12 AM
I like how I fail that on the very first sentence. I don't take notes. At all. :P

Don't even joke about being a failure! You are only giving us several strokes of the painted picture that is yourself and your academic life.

WarPhalange
12-23-08, 04:32 AM
That's not what I meant. They give a checklist of things you should do to be successful in college. Their "basics" state taking good notes. I don't take notes at all. Ergo, I fail their list from the get go.

I'm graduating this year, so it doesn't matter. I'm just saying I never took notes. It hurt me a few times, but damn if those weren't some of the best naps I ever took. :D

cristy07
12-23-08, 11:12 AM
oh, thanks, it's very helpful to me, after reading this one, I realize that if I want to have a good job after graduation I have to work hard and I have to organize what I want to do scientificly

ckamens360
01-22-09, 11:00 PM
This is a great article. I just go by what i feel comfortable doing, and never taking more then i can handle

TransitnSuccess
01-28-09, 12:23 PM
That was a great paper! I am a college Learning Specialist AND the mom of an LD/ADD son who completed college successfully. I also wrote a paper -- "25 Rules of College Success for Students with LD/ADD" whose ideas were gleaned from what I learned both professionally and personally.

Squishey
02-23-09, 09:16 PM
Its not as helpfull to me really. I did a quick skim and its a great article.
Im sure lots of people will be greatfull

liars_paradox
06-02-09, 07:34 PM
I want to put this on my wall!
I really like the idea of 30-3-2- for studying. I can't focus for more than 20-30 minutes but then I get so distracted.
It might help, BUT the question is "how long are the breaks between?" You know, it's VERY easy to take way too long on a break.

I do it all the time. Well, not so much now adays, but it's a real big problem for me still. But, fact is, I'm doing it right now by staying on this forum. So, if you don't have a plan which is guaranteed to get you back to work, then your strategy can back fire easily on a person.

livinginchaos
06-02-09, 09:00 PM
in the past, when I was in school my breaks were 1/2 of the duration of time I studied. If I studied for 30 minutes, I took a 15 minute break. I used a timer to help me keep track of the break time. If I was more motivated to study, I took a 10 minute break.

The duration of the break really depends on the individual and how much time you think is enough of a break. I found the timer to be a very important tool to help me get me back on task. I think a pre-determined break duration works best!


You're right, liars, you need a plan to get going back into studying. IMO, you need to find that motivation that will help. A lot of times it's knowing what you need to do and just digging in and get it done.

Livin' Life
06-03-09, 11:56 AM
I will be leaving for college soon so this was very helpful :)

excel
10-30-09, 09:28 PM
It's similar to where there is a will theres an which hlped to A and Bs

SophiaSan
04-28-10, 01:45 AM
I'm in my second year of college right now and I'm pre-med.
As for as my courses, anything that requires good memory, I can do. But as far as calculations with chem and math I totally suck at.
So I am one of those people who can study for bio 30 mins before a exam and ace it.

But that can only get me so far when I reach harder courses :(
I do have a problem with studying. I can never get things done! Maybe for roughly 30-40 minutes.

Lately I've been noticing that when I do study at school I'm more productive more so than being at home. So I try to finish my homework at school as much as possible. I get so distracted at home...my bed looks so comfortable after a long day of school LOL

Bapp
05-06-10, 11:04 PM
Thanked and thanks! Must.. Get.. Through.. College....

Ky4giraffe
09-23-10, 05:57 PM
I just got diagnosed with inattentive ADHD. I am going to a tech school (NWTC) and I have yet to call their support services (mainly because I forget until its to late in the day!)
but I have a huge test coming up in one of my classes (chapters 1-6, 168 terms plus 10 amendments!!)
and I was wondering if I should email my teacher and ask her if she could at lest tell me exactly what I should study.
Also I was wondering if anyone knows exactly how long it takes to get help for have ADD through support services?

livinginchaos
09-27-10, 12:44 AM
hi Ky4!

First, go to your school's disability services office. Find out what you need to do to apply for accommodations.
When I applied I needed the diagnosis paperwork from my doc and a note from him spelling out what accommodations I needed.


It can't hurt to talk with your teacher, but don't expect that she'll tell you.

heroscreamer
10-22-10, 09:43 AM
The first thing you need to do is "prove" that you have a "disability" as they call it. As discribed by the ordering Dr. this means your brain simply does not function like others do, in either certain situations (testing, studying, etc.) Or certain subjects (Math) are not registering as "making since." In my case I complicate most college level Math; meaning I read into the equations too deep, making it unsolvable.

Sorry ADD moment there, So...um ya, What was I talking about? Ok, The Dr. has to type a note saying you have this "disability" and you will give this to your DSS Manager.

The next step is to fill out a form the manager give you requesting the service.

The DSS Manager will then send forms in the mail, advising you to hand deliver them to your instructors, in my case, She also emails all my instructors with these forms (awesome).

I take all proctored exams in a Learning Center behind a closed door by myself with no distractions (i know sounds too good to be true). It has helped me greatly. I am officially an all "A" Student today!

PLEASE TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THIS SERVICE, YOU WILL BE MUCH MORE SUCCESSFUL.

BlackouTT
12-19-10, 01:54 AM
Thank you for the post its really going to help me next semester

Kara593
05-11-11, 08:05 PM
I'm so ADD I couldnt even read all of that. I looked,zoned out when I saw all the text and detached.


:(


I bet it was really helpful

Kara593
05-11-11, 08:08 PM
I am in the same exact situation as you! I'm pre-med also and I have trouble with math and chemistry but I got an A on my bio final without studying. I also find I can study more at school than at home. I'm happy I'm not alone in this! :)


What college do you go to?










I'm in my second year of college right now and I'm pre-med.
As for as my courses, anything that requires good memory, I can do. But as far as calculations with chem and math I totally suck at.
So I am one of those people who can study for bio 30 mins before a exam and ace it.

But that can only get me so far when I reach harder courses :(
I do have a problem with studying. I can never get things done! Maybe for roughly 30-40 minutes.

Lately I've been noticing that when I do study at school I'm more productive more so than being at home. So I try to finish my homework at school as much as possible. I get so distracted at home...my bed looks so comfortable after a long day of school LOL

Grasshoppaa
05-11-11, 09:12 PM
I am in the same exact situation as you! I'm pre-med also and I have trouble with math and chemistry but I got an A on my bio final without studying. I also find I can study more at school than at home. I'm happy I'm not alone in this! :)


What college do you go to?

Hey! I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but nobody has responded to this thread besides you in over six months. Any questions/comments, etc. that you have, feel free to start a new topic about it! (nobody really reads these old topics anyways).

kitty92
08-16-11, 03:20 PM
Great!!!!!!!! you went over every thing and had it catigorized so you cols kip o what you need

Tykira
09-28-11, 01:02 PM
Very good. I'm gonna try some of these tips! :-)

karijoo90
12-06-11, 12:51 AM
what kinds of things do you guys request from your office of disabilities at your school? i don't even know where to begin on what kind of specific accommodations i'd like...

ScottADHD
12-09-11, 02:35 PM
I would go to the disabilities office and they would give me my test in a quiet room with double the time.

This is all I personally really needed. Depending upon your needs I know of some students who have someone read the questions to them

Ranmaru
02-06-12, 11:54 AM
Yes I do homework the day of, always. I study the day before a test. I can't do well if I study the same day.

heytheredelilah
04-24-12, 12:12 PM
Hmm ... I feel like the tips on the page the OP posted are only helpful if you're medicated. I only kind of skimmed through after seeing write notes on losel leaf paper.

The chances of me ending up with an actual collection of notes if I write on lose leaf paper is ... um, 0! I may forget my spiral notebook sometimes, but chances are I ll end up with about half the notes I need.

And cramming does work! The only three exams in my university career that I aced, I started studying for the night before (for two of them, I had never opened the textbook before)... and I remember everything I learned. I like to think it's all scarred into my brain because of how panicked, stimulated w/ coffee, and sleep deprived I was. There were a thousand alarms going on in my head.

anonymouslyadd
04-28-12, 01:46 AM
what kinds of things do you guys request from your office of disabilities at your school? i don't even know where to begin on what kind of specific accommodations i'd like...


Tape recorder for lectures
Extra time for exams
Quiet area for exams

brandon_g
05-27-12, 11:49 AM
Well I am still a freshman in high school for another 12 school days... So this is not very helpful college wise... however it may come in handy for homework and such... I seem with my medication to be able focus for 30 or 40 minutes stright even with distractions... and about 60 to 85 minutes in a nice quiet enveriment such as a room with only me and a teacher. But defiently this helpful.

Rikatah
06-15-12, 11:43 AM
"Time management- DO NOT STUDY FOR MORE THAN 2 HOURS AT A TIME - Your brain really does shut down and any studying you do after that point is just a waste of time."

I've always wondered about this- I've always felt like my head shuts down after a while... never really understood why, this is very helpful for school in general. Will definetly try to remember it all for sophomore year.

Something I found out helps me at times is drawing pictures that I associate with what I'm learning- it kinda triggers my memory

discplaced mind
11-08-12, 12:28 AM
this is extreamly helpfull going to to refeer to this again

ariannehowell
12-18-12, 07:15 PM
I like the tips you shared and this will be very helpful to all students who really want to pass their college life. If you fail on the first time make sure that you will strive hard better and you should be motivated in your career path.

ericmorgan
03-11-13, 07:05 AM
Hi, its really awesome for success to college.. thanks for sharing this walllllllllllllllllllll my dear..

hs_sci_teacher
12-29-13, 05:56 PM
I freak out when I see a lot of text, too. Something that has helped me is copying text from a website into a word document. Sometimes I change the color and the font to sometime I and read more easily. This article has a lot of bullet points, so I generally just scan the first few words of each to see if I want to read on.

tenet_
03-23-14, 04:33 AM
Thanks for this :)
Hopefully this will be of some use

seanmotive
04-15-14, 03:39 AM
Being a Junior in college in information science with ADHD, I'd say most aspects of this article are what I absolutely hate hearing will help you succeed in college. As a student, obviously you should study every day and spread out your work, join every club and activity, get a 4.0, but none of these things are realistic.
A few things, I wish I was told going into college even throughout my first 2 years in college:

1. Start finding like you enjoy doing, this doesn't mean a specific job or major. There are so many majors I have never even heard of still going through college.

2. Try to take the classes that will apply to potential major early. Don't take all general educations because people tell you thats what freshman year "is."
After changing my major in sophomore year, I wasn't able to take all the classes I wanted because I now had different requirements than in the previous major.

3. Ratemyprofessor.com will save your life! It is a database of the reviews of most professors. Everyone says you will have bad professors but this should help you avoid them. I hated lectures, could never focus,d id I sit at the front and take every note? Nope, found teachers that engaged students and wanted to help. Going to a professor and asking for help will teach you far quicker and better than trying to take notes off a board for a hour. Still knowing what the professor went over and learning what I could on my own was also very important.

4. Networking is maybe the most important aspects of college I have found. This is both social and professional. But the people can meet in college will help you so much more than your GPA. I have taken classes that I didn't need, just to work with a certain professor. She was able to introduce me to so many people (Entrepreneurs, CEO's, previous students that excelled in my major) that can tell you what their mistakes, failures, and what they would change.

5. GPA is still important! Experience usually beats GPA for the most part, but you still must maintain a decent GPA. Be sure to do go in earlier classes because they probably the easiest classes you will take in all 4 years. Maintaining GPA is a lot easier than bringing it back up. Depending on major, this will vary. Getting internships and entry level jobs will look at your GPA since you probably have little or no experience. A 4.0 with leadership experience in a club or activity is definitely super impressive to a employer.

Ken2013
05-25-14, 09:04 PM
For those who are too impatient to read through pages of text, there's a spaced repetition program called "Anki".

Basically you make your own flashcards and the program determines how often it gets reviewed based on how easy you found it.

I only started using it in my final year of Med School, but I seriously wish I knew about it in 1st year. It would've reduced my overall stress levels as I would've been more organized from the start and not resort to cramming.

Maintenance is the key to remembering a lot of the information, so constant review of little flashcards will help you heaps in the long run.

The only bother is having to spend time to make the flashcards, but that's also part of the learning process.

I would recommend "Anki" for those who are studying subjects that involve a lot of rote memory, especially languages (vocabulary) and science (biology, chemistry, physics).

Herose
06-03-14, 11:42 AM
Well there are some new things for me to try though! I do like the article, but not all of them are helpfull. I don't have lecture tapes of some sort and sitting in front is not useful with our lecture halls, because most of the noise travels to the front and its quiet in the back.

lvlover58
10-13-16, 01:10 PM
What works for me is subject locations and Quizlet.
For some reason, any school work I consume won't stick to my memory. I usually have to find a connection between what I'm learning and "real world" examples.

When studying, I usually do so in the library.
- I wear a baseball hat to block any visual distractions.
- I wear Bose QC35 noise cancelling headphones to dampen anyone flipping the page of a book or any footsteps. I usually play recordings of a white noise machines to help me not get distracted by the sheer science these headphones bring.
- I have a specific spot in the library for each subject I study.
- I have an AppleWatch to remind me to move onto another subject or to take a break; I tend to loose track of time -- a side effect from the medications I take.
- I also use taste rewards; a method I developed in effort to help me learn new material. For example; when I'm teaching myself new material, after each and every sentence, bullet point or fact, I wet my finger tip, dip into a bag of sugar, then touch that sugar coated finger to the tip of my tongue. This method works very well.
- Quizlet is something every college student should check out if they haven't heard of it. it's an ADDers dream for studying large quantities of material.