View Full Version : Adderall Effects - ADD/ADHD person Vs. Non ADD/ADHD Person


tweekzip
11-05-07, 02:23 AM
Can anyone list some similarities and differences between the normal effects and side effects of a ADD/ADHD Person on Adderall and a Non ADD/ADHD Person? Thanks!

QueensU_girl
11-05-07, 02:45 AM
Is this for homework or something?

tweekzip
11-05-07, 02:46 AM
Nope, I was diagnosed and I just want to make sure it's having the right effect on me so I can be sure If I really do have ADHD or not, as I was skeptical when diagnosed

umami
11-05-07, 03:00 AM
interestingly, a person's response to stimulant medication is not diagnostic of an attention deficity disorder. everyone responds differently to medications, hence the whole pharmacogenomic movement. if the medication isn't helping you to focus, better concentrate, and better organize your life, perhaps you either haven't reached your minimal effective dose or should consider trying a different medication.

tweekzip
11-05-07, 03:12 AM
Well the first time it seemed to calm me down, a euphoric feeling, nasal passages seemed to open/tingling sensation, definitely felt like I could concentrate and focus and everything with school and interacting seemed to flow very well. The second time was all the same excepet instead of calming I was more hyper and noticed I was tapping my foot ( I do this normally so I don't know if that's ADHD or just a habbit). So I just want to make sure that I am benefiting from it only in a sense of treating a "disorder," I'm still skeptical about taking it, so i'm taking in all the information that I can before I make my decision. I could really care less about taking it for any reason other than making me feel like a "Normal" person, which I feel like it helps me with as far as focusing and social interaction go. I think QueensU may be under the impression that i'm not prescribed or taking it for a non-ADD related reason. That is not true, i'm actually worried about it having more negative effects then positive effects, all of which I will have to weigh in the near future. Thanks for the time and info, I really do appreciate it!

Matt S.
11-05-07, 10:42 AM
I know people with ADHD and giving them a stimulant gives them energy and drive and it calms me down and makes me kind of lazy

gridley
11-05-07, 01:24 PM
I am not that experienced so far, so take my words with a grain of salt.

From what I know, adderall taken by a non-ADHD person will make them jittery and hyper. In an ADHD person, it should help calm them and make them less disorganized in thought.

For example, my sister in law once took Adderall before work because she had been up all night drinking and needed something to keep her energized. Someone gave her adderall. She said it was a nightmare. Her heart was racing so bad and she felt so hyper and jittery and panicky. But then again, she has no idea of the dosage she took, and she took it after a night of drinking. ALL WHICH ARE VERY VERY BAD IDEAS OF COURSE!!!!! But still, she was really interested to see what kind of an effect it had on me.

For me, I have to say it can make me jittery and anxious if I drink caffeine with it. So, I skip caffeine. I only take 15-20 mg per day. And it makes me a tad more energized, but other than that, I am not sure if I can notice the effects. I dont' seem more motivated to keep on task or more organized at all. But it could be due to my issues in life, and not just the medication.

The point I am trying to make is that it really is so dependent on lots of factors. Someone just diagnosed who is given adderall might find wonderful and obvious benefits and no side effects. Or, it can have horrible side effects and no benefits, but the person still has ADD, just is not on the right med or perhaps needs another non-med treatment, like coaching. Get what I am saying? It is not black and white at all. It can be a long journey finding the best treatment for yourself, but don't give up if the first treatment or medication is not successful.

Matt S.
11-05-07, 04:09 PM
From what I know, adderall taken by a non-ADHD person will make them jittery and hyper. In an ADHD person, it should help calm them and make them less disorganized in thought.
inattentives don't need to be calmed down.

Skully
11-05-07, 09:40 PM
interestingly, a person's response to stimulant medication is not diagnostic of an attention deficity disorder. everyone responds differently to medications, hence the whole pharmacogenomic movement. if the medication isn't helping you to focus, better concentrate, and better organize your life, perhaps you either haven't reached your minimal effective dose or should consider trying a different medication.
Ditto. Well said.

cloud1
11-05-07, 11:36 PM
inattentives don't need to be calmed down. Aint that the truth! I need all the energy and motivation I can get :p

Flutterbudget
11-06-07, 02:19 PM
I felt like I had suddenly gone into the slow-motion world, kind of like in "The Matrix" when they do the bullet-time thing. Normally, time does not really exist for me. I joke that I have the same perception of time as my five-year-old -- which is to say, none whatsoever. I live in the eternal now. On Adderall, I was aware of time passing -- that excrutiatingly boring chore suddenly really did only take a minute to do, and that fascinating activity really did take longer than thirty seconds. I realized that I did actually have time to hang up my coat, everything in general seemed to be happening much more slowly.

I had only one thought at a time, which was rather disconcerting as I'm used to there being shouting matches inside my head.

I felt very calm and serene. Not sleepy, not euphoric, just not frantic. Things which normally make me lose my temper didn't seem like such a big deal at all (squabbling children, interruptions, ringing telephones, slow drivers).

For the first time in my life, I drove below the speed limit.

I also didn't experience my normal dizzying highs/stomach churning lows of emotions. And I wasn't as annoyed by boringness.

It made me very quiet. If I had nothing to say, I said nothing. Which is very uncharacteristic of me.

It also, unfortunately, put the brakes on my witty personality. I normally am the life of the party and am the master of the zinger. Couldn't think of any witty things at all to say. Instead, I made Appropriate Remarks and Conventional Small Talk. I found this rather disturbing, as my wit and ability to say what everyone thinks but would never say is a big part of my magic.

And it gave me horrible headaches, grinding teeth, aching joints, and no sex drive. So I stopped taking it. But I miss being able to fold laundry without screaming.

HooahMSII
11-06-07, 11:05 PM
I am not that experienced so far, so take my words with a grain of salt.

From what I know, adderall taken by a non-ADHD person will make them jittery and hyper. In an ADHD person, it should help calm them and make them less disorganized in thought. I see this mentioned a lot and it simply is not true. Adderall will do the same thing in someone without ADD and it will in someone with it. College students don't abuse Adderall because they enjoy being jittery and hyper; they do it to concentrate and focus for long periods of time.

The jitteryness and such are dose-dependent. My guess is that ADD people can tolerate a higher dose of the meds before the bad stuff starts to happen, since they function at a lower basline to begin with. But, this is complete assumption. We haven't had neuropsych yet :D

StarLilly123
11-07-07, 09:07 AM
I find that there is a world of difference between Adderall IR and Adderall XR. I was started on the IR at 10mg/day a few months ago when I was newly dx'd with ADHD and I had to cease taking it after a couple of weeks because of the horrid crash/side effects. I also felt very irritable and moody and just couldn't handle it.

Once my pdoc started me on the XR....What a difference it made for me. No crash or rebound and it lated 5-7 hours, instead of maximum of 2-3 hours. I am currently taking 30XR early a.m. and 30XR early p.m. as my days start very early and end late. I also find that taking my doses on an empty stomach allows me to benefit from it's full effectiveness. I have tried it both ways, and notice a big difference. Another side benefit for me is that it curbs my over-active appetite, so I eat less food and don't feel that nagging hunger all the time. I realize that most people have the opposite problem with appetite, but not me, dang it :)

lostmyshoes14
11-07-07, 06:34 PM
My experience with adderall is that it calms me down. According to my doctor I am a "text-book ADHD case". I wasnt diagnosed until I was 20, mostly because I wasnt a person who struggled through school, but my family became fed up with me. I have always been very irritable, would lash out randomly. My mind always felt like it was racing a mile minute and I somehow had to rationalize how I felt by acting out so I did. The adderall allows me to center my thoughts, feel calm, and deal with situations that would have made me explode in the past. I can always remember seeing people do things such as read a newspaper or do homework in a public place such as on the bus. In the past I couldnt even fathom doing that, with the help of the add diagnosis and medication I can focus my attention onto a task amidst other distractions. So the effect it has on myself a "textbook adhd case" is a calming one which allows me to direct my attention to the task at hand rather than getting lost amongst a million minor details racing through my head. :)

thn5625
11-10-07, 02:18 PM
I see this mentioned a lot and it simply is not true. Adderall will do the same thing in someone without ADD and it will in someone with it. College students don't abuse Adderall because they enjoy being jittery and hyper; they do it to concentrate and focus for long periods of time.

The jitteryness and such are dose-dependent. My guess is that ADD people can tolerate a higher dose of the meds before the bad stuff starts to happen, since they function at a lower basline to begin with. But, this is complete assumption. We haven't had neuropsych yet :D
Actually nonADD students are more prone to dependency from studies and this is because they get the stimulant effects more strongly. Many of them take it for increase wakefullness during finals hence why they are more likely to take it for the stimulant effct. In fact data shows they take it at very high doses. At a low dose the ADD person will feel clarity of thought in mundane tasks. They are less likely to abuse it.

Someone with ADD is thought to have an increased ability to think laterally which is horrible for most school work. Cat scans of ADDers show an "unconscious like" state when reading whereas a nonADDer shows a normal state. Our neural network is different which is why we probably take lower doses than nonADDers. Adderall in high doses is meth-like for anyone.

meadd823
11-10-07, 10:42 PM
The jitteryness and such are dose-dependent. My guess is that ADD people can tolerate a higher dose of the meds before the bad stuff starts to happen,



Actually nonADD students are more prone to dependency from studies and this is because they get the stimulant effects more strongly. Many of them take it for increase wakefullness during finals hence why they are more likely to take it for the stimulant effct. In fact data shows they take it at very high doses. At a low dose the ADD person will feel clarity of thought in mundane tasks. They are less likely to abuse it.

Long time ago around the time of the dinosaur I used dex along with some other folks in an illegal manner. That experience revealed both of the above quotes to be true.

I could take the same amount of dex as my friends and I was always entertained by the fact it made them more like I was off of it and me me like them when they were "straight". They got a high I apparently didn't experience however I found I could actually do my homework without turning my books into flying objects. My friends also tended to abuse the dex some times wanting to take higher and higher doses while I preferred not to. I didn't like to feel wired but I loved the fact I could sit down and study actually absorbing the material in the midst of chaos without being distracted by all the noise.



interestingly, a person's response to stimulant medication is not diagnostic of an attention deficity disorder. everyone responds differently to medications,

The above is also true.

netsavy006
11-10-07, 10:45 PM
I've heard on a news cast about college students using adderall and similar meds to pull all-nighters, and then they crash in the morning. Personally I wouldn't use a stimulant for such a purpose. I've been on stimulants and they made me more drowsy and less alert, even strattera. (which is not a stimulant)

gridley
11-12-07, 10:30 AM
I see this mentioned a lot and it simply is not true. Adderall will do the same thing in someone without ADD and it will in someone with it. College students don't abuse Adderall because they enjoy being jittery and hyper; they do it to concentrate and focus for long periods of time.

The jitteryness and such are dose-dependent. My guess is that ADD people can tolerate a higher dose of the meds before the bad stuff starts to happen, since they function at a lower basline to begin with. But, this is complete assumption. We haven't had neuropsych yet :D

Really none of us should go around saying how any one person will respond to adderall, whether ADD or not. We all know everyone responds differently to these meds. It is said time and time again right on these forums.

I would never claim to know how anyone might respond, but I can relate the anecdotes I have heard from non ADD'ers I personally know who have tried adderall "for fun".

It made them hyper.

This is only based on 2 people, I have no idea the dose or other circumstances, but that is what I was told. The original question was about the similarities and differences when an ADD person or a non ADD person takes adderall.

I guess the answer is: It doesn't really matter, does it? What matters is how the individual reacts, and comparing it to another might be interesting, but not really indicative of much for each person.

cloverkiss
11-12-07, 10:46 PM
The way I see it:

I believe that ADDer's become calmer... but all in all... helps them gain the concentration that are lacking. And I guess some people get more energy... but i guess whatevers nessecary... so be it. We're all different...FACE IT!

& non-ADDer's just like it for the extra energy and extra focus...wait... maybe it doesn't help with focus... just helps with the 'pulling an all nighter' to do homework barable.



****es me off that these people abuse it.
They just help the stigma of ADD meds worsen. :mad:

MED GENIUS
07-02-08, 04:12 PM
Aint that the truth! I need all the energy and motivation I can get :p


Um acctually for me, im an inatentive diagnosis,no energy, cant get up in the moring, feel dead all the time,PHYSICALY. But in my mind, its going a million miles an hour none stop, so even though im not exibiting physical hyperactivity my mind is going a million miles an hour.

ToneTone
07-02-08, 05:21 PM
Basically, if you are skeptical of the diagnosis, I fear you're going to have a problem.
I fear either

1) you have a totally incompetent mental health care professional who falsely diagnosed you

or

2) you are not aware of the negative effect this condition has on your life.

3.) I also fear that if you don't accept the diagnosis, then you won't give the medicine a chance or appreciate the medicine when it's working well! And you could undermine the good effects of the meds with other unhelpful behavior. So this is a big issue.

4.) Can you say more about how you got diagnosed, your age, who pushed you to the diagnosis, etc. And so more about why you think you don't have the condition. Can you sit a read a book for an hour? 30 minutes? Can you read social signals when a girl or guy is showing interest in you? Can you complete projects by the established deadlines? Can you remember scheduled appointments, like doctor's visits or other meetings? Who diagnosed you? A family doctor? Psychiatrist? Psychologist? How long was the test?

Nick682
07-08-08, 01:18 AM
I felt like I had suddenly gone into the slow-motion world, kind of like in "The Matrix" when they do the bullet-time thing. Normally, time does not really exist for me. I joke that I have the same perception of time as my five-year-old -- which is to say, none whatsoever. I live in the eternal now. On Adderall, I was aware of time passing -- that excrutiatingly boring chore suddenly really did only take a minute to do, and that fascinating activity really did take longer than thirty seconds. I realized that I did actually have time to hang up my coat, everything in general seemed to be happening much more slowly.

I had only one thought at a time, which was rather disconcerting as I'm used to there being shouting matches inside my head.

I felt very calm and serene. Not sleepy, not euphoric, just not frantic. Things which normally make me lose my temper didn't seem like such a big deal at all (squabbling children, interruptions, ringing telephones, slow drivers).

For the first time in my life, I drove below the speed limit.

I also didn't experience my normal dizzying highs/stomach churning lows of emotions. And I wasn't as annoyed by boringness.

It made me very quiet. If I had nothing to say, I said nothing. Which is very uncharacteristic of me.

It also, unfortunately, put the brakes on my witty personality. I normally am the life of the party and am the master of the zinger. Couldn't think of any witty things at all to say. Instead, I made Appropriate Remarks and Conventional Small Talk. I found this rather disturbing, as my wit and ability to say what everyone thinks but would never say is a big part of my magic.

And it gave me horrible headaches, grinding teeth, aching joints, and no sex drive. So I stopped taking it. But I miss being able to fold laundry without screaming.

I couldn't agree more with your post, I feel the same way as you do, so much of what you said, really hit home for me. I spent the first 27 years of my life denying I had ADD, and learning to cope. Trouble is that I have always been interested in science. But I could never pass the high level math classes. I would bang my head against the wall, just trying to concentrate long enough to get one chemistry problem done. I have so much willpower, but I just couldn't overcome the lack of concentration being in the military helped but even after that, no matter how hard I tried, I just couldn't do high level math.

I knew it wasn't because I wasn't smart enough, I had demonstrated many times, that I could be very smart. The whole problem was concentration. Taking the adderal has truly fixed the problem, it is the magic cure for my concentration issues. I can identify with every one of your feelings. I too, used to be much more sociable, now I worry, if I can even make new friends sometimes. I just don't feel like myself, I feel like one of the normal people, I used to kinda laugh at. I like the real me, but at the same time, I really enjoy having peaceful fluid thoughts that last for more than two seconds. I notice only after two days off the drug that my full ADD symptoms come back again.

I have more energy, but my head is just cranking out thoughts, I never stay on the same thought for very long, and requires so much effort to do so, that it gets me frustrated sometimes. I never realized that life could be so easy with a little bit of concentration.

Mincan
07-08-08, 02:09 AM
I felt like I had suddenly gone into the slow-motion world, kind of like in "The Matrix" when they do the bullet-time thing. Normally, time does not really exist for me. I joke that I have the same perception of time as my five-year-old -- which is to say, none whatsoever. I live in the eternal now. On Adderall, I was aware of time passing -- that excrutiatingly boring chore suddenly really did only take a minute to do, and that fascinating activity really did take longer than thirty seconds. I realized that I did actually have time to hang up my coat, everything in general seemed to be happening much more slowly.

For the first time in my life, I drove below the speed limit.

I also didn't experience my normal dizzying highs/stomach churning lows of emotions. And I wasn't as annoyed by boringness.

It made me very quiet. If I had nothing to say, I said nothing. Which is very uncharacteristic of me.

It also, unfortunately, put the brakes on my witty personality. I normally am the life of the party and am the master of the zinger. Couldn't think of any witty things at all to say. Instead, I made Appropriate Remarks and Conventional Small Talk. I found this rather disturbing, as my wit and ability to say what everyone thinks but would never say is a big part of my magic.
Aye!!!!

ozchris
07-08-08, 05:50 AM
interestingly, a person's response to stimulant medication is not diagnostic of an attention deficity disorder. everyone responds differently to medications, hence the whole pharmacogenomic movement. if the medication isn't helping you to focus, better concentrate, and better organize your life, perhaps you either haven't reached your minimal effective dose or should consider trying a different medication.

exactly!

There's no rule that says stimulants calm down ADDers and spin out non-ADDers...that's just total BS.

Some ADDers will be calmed by stimulants.
Some ADDers will be made jittery and speedy by stimulants.

Some non-ADDers will be calmed by stimulants
Some non-ADDers will be jittery and speedy.

There's no evidence showing that ADDers have a significantly different effect from stimulants than people without ADD.

Basically - drugs effect everyone differently. :)