View Full Version : Some ideas on a.d.d. and teaching


robi kundera
11-20-07, 08:43 PM
I'm a first generation add kid, now thirty-one. I am also a high school english/writing/media-studies teacher. Here are some of the most helpful things I've learned about teaching add students.

Punishment doesn't work. They won't correct the behavior and only causes frustration on both ends. I use a positive reinforcement system where I give tickets to students for desirable behavior which they could later trade in for points on an assignment or a paper extension. If anyone wants more details let me know.

Let them do jobs during class. Take notes on board. Erase board. Go get the t.v. from the library, etc. The other kids will understand; make a light joke of it.

When any student is acting up I will focus all my attention on them until it stops. Next walk over and just stand quietly by their side and wait;make it a bit uncomfortable for them.

I think this book is great:
http://www.amazon.com/Rediscover-Joy-Learning-Don-Blackerby/dp/1889997005/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1195605747&sr=8-1

QueensU_girl
11-20-07, 11:07 PM
If there is frustration with LD/ADD children, i think it is important to slow down and ask what all might be going on with them, deficit wise.

ADD is more than the obvious "golden triad" of inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity.

For example: Executive Dysfunction of the Frontal Lobe is a huge problem that teachers do NOT get.

'When your brain doesn't work right, your life doesn't work right.' (e.g. socially, academically, occupationally, athletically, etc.)


http://www.schoolbehavior.com/conditions_edfoverview2.htm



For example, most ADDers have terrible Auditory Memory or Auditory Processing deficits (shows on NeuroPsych Testing).

So... We don't always "Process or "Remember" what we just Heard. (Once it gets IN THERE, though, we can be Elephants. <G>)

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I recall one teacher when I was quite small who would scream at me (a form of punishment i guess( for "daydreaming".

Back then (I am five years older than you), they didn't know about things like ADD and LDs very much, though. Just the "Special ED" (obviously dysmorphic and low IQ and illiterate) kids were the ones identified as being "different" and having relaxed standards or expectations.


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- One thing you can do in your classes is to 'Appoint A Class Paraphraser'.
This student's job is to 're-tell' the important parts of what was just said (with teacher's prompting) for the rest of the Class.

- Write out instructions (in workbook upper corner and on Black board) as well as Saying them to the class. This helps prompt kids with input problems (hearing) as they try to create output (written work) by brinigng them back to task.


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For those of us with poor Auditory Working Memory, it is as though Words Disappear into the Air, so writing stuff down and repeating (the phonological loops & mental blackboard that Baddeley talked about in his theories of working memory), really help!

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I learned about this in Dr. Mel Levine's DVDs. He is a Developmental Pediatrician. His DVDs are awesome.

In the one that I saw, he toured all these special schools (some with really bright kids), with their ADD/LD trained teachers.

The teachers and their "tricks" were AWESOME. I really recommend them.

Crazy~Feet
11-20-07, 11:50 PM
When any student is acting up I will focus all my attention on them until it stops. Next walk over and just stand quietly by their side and wait;make it a bit uncomfortable for them. You bring up some good points, but I have some other things to add regarding the above quoted portion.

Some children will interpret this tactic as positive reinforcement, and respond by acting up more often, rather than less. Some children will not be made uncomfortable at all to have the teacher come to stand by them after they misbehave, rather, they will be delighted that they can now "control" the teacher.

Furthermore, not all children with ADHD will act up. In fact, some will not disturb the class at all. The inattentive child will seldom draw attention to themselves...of course, they may not be paying attention to the lessons, either. What tactic do you utilize for students with this type of ADHD? Are you recognizing these children and their set of symptoms?

robi kundera
11-25-07, 12:20 PM
Thanks for your thoughtful comments. For inattentive types I think seating arrangement is most helpful. Front of class and away from distractions. Periodic conferencing and encouragement can also be helpful. Would love to hear more ideas on this one.

jc10101
01-02-08, 02:01 AM
robi kundera i agree and i dont agree with what you said about "When any student is acting up I will focus all my attention on them until it stops. Next walk over and just stand quietly by their side and wait;make it a bit uncomfortable for them."

the reason i say this is not all add/adhd students are they same, like for me(i was a quite person)never got in trouble, i was someone, who just wanted to be independent and do my work. so becareful on who you focus all of your attention on. as Crazy~Feet posted. i agree with. i was one of those people who didnt ever draw attention in the classroom. anyway i think for those who dont cause that much trouble should be seated by the door and away from other talkative students.