View Full Version : I think I know the reason for...


arkyle
12-13-07, 02:45 AM
I've been feeling quite unstable lately; diagnosis, family issues, and relationship issues too. I just wanted somewhere to take it out. In a (very) summarized way, I've always been cold as ice (I think I have Schizoid to some degree :P), but lately I've started to speak my heart and not only my mind. It has been since I realized I was totally in love with a friend of mine. We have some kind of weird story since both aren't too good expressing our emotions and that she was with another friend. Then I realized how I felt about her and then they broke up. She was depressed for a few months and now I'm pretty sure she wants to try something with me. I should be excited about it since I can barely explain how I feel about her, it's like a drug; but then comes the (new) problem: my gigantic fear to commitment. The longest time I've been with someone was for three months (she had to move somewhere else) and since then I haven't had any serious relationship with anyone, and this was about 3 years ago.

Now that I think about it I think I know where my fear to commitment comes from. I've never been able to maintain something for long, either an activity or anything at all. Now I know I've been an ADDer always (lol, BTW, I talked to one of my best friends earlier about my diagnosis and she was like "oh, so that's why..." - "Do I do that a lot?" - "Always!!!!") and know that not being able to maintain something for a long time is one of the consequences of the disorder in the frontal lobes and in the ejecutive function of the brain; I think that's it. Still, I'm scared to death because I don't think I'll be able to commit myself to it completely. And adding the fact that now I have to get used to the new ways in my life...well, I dont know what else.

Guest1
12-13-07, 03:25 AM
Schizoid Personality Disorder : A pervasive pattern of detachment from social relationships and a restricted range of expression of emotions in interpersonal settings, beginning by early adulthood and present in a variety of contexts, as indicated by four (or more) of the following:

(1) neither desires nor enjoys close relationships, including being part of a family

(2) almost always chooses solitary activities

(3) has little, if any, interest in having sexual experiences with another person

(4) takes pleasure in few, if any, activities

(5) lacks close friends or confidants other than first-degree relatives

(6) appears indifferent to the praise or criticism of others

(7) shows emotional coldness, detachment, or flattened affectivity



Description :

Unlike people with schizotypal personality disorder who may have one or two semi-close relationships, people with schizoid personality disorder are extreme loners and rarely have any close relationships.

The major characteristics of schizoid personality disorder are:

1) No desire for social relationships: People with schizoid personality disorder have no desire to form close relationships. They may form stable relationships with family members or other people but they lack the ability to form close relationships.

2) Little or no sex drive : Individuals with this disorder have little sex drive and rarely date or marry. Men are more likely to remain single than women probably because they lack the social skills to initiate courtships. Women may passively date and marry, but will remain emotionally aloof.

3) Preference for solitary activities : Some people with schizoid personality disorder are very creative, especially with art in the form of painting, sculpting, drawing, etc. Art may take the place of relationships. They typically remain in low level jobs that require little interpersonal contact.

4) Limited range of emotions : They have a restricted range of emotions in social settings. This is often described as coldness, detachment, or flatteness. People with this disorder appear to be indifferent to compliments and criticisms. They take little or no joy in activities or in life.

Treatment :

Individual psychotherapy is the preferred treatment method by most people with this disorder. By getting the individual to share their art and develop the relationship from that base, a therapist may be able to establish rapport. Therapists often encourage the person to share their personal hobbies, like music or art with others. Behavior therapy, such gradual exposure to specific tasks, also called systematic desensitization, can help the person form confidence in a social setting. The therapist would probably recommend the person begin with activities which involve little socialization and advance to activities requiring more and more socialization. Group therapy may help the person build social relationships in a supportive atmosphere. Family therapy may also be helpful since people with this disorder typically remain in the house longer. However, though the person's condition may improve, most still prefer solitary activities over social ones.



Diagnostic Criteria


A pervasive pattern of detachment from social relationships and a restricted range of expression of emotions in interpersonal settings, beginning by early adulthood and present in a variety of contexts, as indicated by four (or more) of the following:
neither desires nor enjoys close relationships, including being part of a family
almost always chooses solitary activities
has little, if any, interest in having sexual experiences with another person
takes pleasure in few, if any, activities
lacks close friends or confidants other than first-degree relatives
appears indifferent to the praise or criticism of others
shows emotional coldness, detachment, or flattened affectivity

Does not occur exclusively during the course of Schizophrenia, a Mood Disorder With Psychotic Features, another Psychotic Disorder, or a Pervasive Developmental Disorder and is not due to the direct physiological effects of a general medical condition.
Note: If criteria are met prior to the onset of Schizophrenia, add "Premorbid," e.g., "Schizoid Personality Disorder (Premorbid)."




Associated Features



Odd/Eccentric/Suspicious Personality


Differential Diagnosis

Delusional Disorder; Schizophrenia; and Mood Disorder With Psychotic Features; Autistic Disorder; Asperger's Disorder; Personality Change Due to a General Medical Condition; symptoms that may develop in association with chronic substance use; Schizotypal Personality Disorder; Paranoid Personality Disorder; Avoidant Personality Disorder; Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder.