View Full Version : Mind Mapping


WeepingWillow
12-19-07, 03:18 PM
I fall in the realm of either or both ADD/ADHD and brain injury. I got accepted to graduate school and want to give myself the best possible chances... opportunities to succeed.

I was reading threads posted awhile back... and remembered someone mentioning something about some "Mind Mapping" software. Could I get some input and ideas from people in what helps them?

In addition, I was told about some calender program where I could color scheme things, etc.

I figure, I will finally utilize my calendar at work and have it send me reminders of when things are due, in addition to deadline dates for scholarships, etc.

Thanks for all your input.

Wexder5
01-01-08, 10:53 AM
I find that mind mapping works for me as well.

Look up
"Mind Mapping by Stephen Pierce" on youtube.com


:cool:

supamook
01-18-08, 04:55 AM
mind mapping is fantastic.

Xero
01-26-08, 02:32 AM
I discovered mindmapping a couple of years ago and secretly used it prior to being diagnosed because I knew I would keep forgetting ****.

It's WAY easier (for me at least) to do Mindmaps on the computer because I just constantly brainstorm. Using software you can get ideas and concepts and drag 'em round. On the PC or Mac I can recommend Mindjet MindManager (http://www.mindjet.com). It's awesome but I only use it because my work has a corporate license. Prior to that I was using Freemind (http://freemind.sourceforge.net/wiki/index.php/Main_Page) which is just as good if not better since it's free and it's available on Mac and PC too.

More info on Mind mapping (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mind_mapping)

Hope that info helps someone

WeepingWillow
01-28-08, 01:34 PM
Thank you for the information!!!

GO_Dark
03-13-09, 09:01 AM
AH HA!! I love mind mapping too, it's the only way I can hope to organise documents I make :oD

For those of us who can't afford/don't want to pay for mind manager (which is VERY good) then there's a free piece of software called free mind, in runs on pretty much everything (mac and pc) and can be found here:

http://freemind.sourceforge.net/wiki/index.php/Main_Page < main info

http://freemind.sourceforge.net/wiki/index.php/Download < download link

Let me know if you find it handy :o)

GO_Dark
03-13-09, 09:02 AM
LOL Sorry Xero, just realised you'd already mentioned free mind, there I go jumping the gun again! :s

Cacho
01-09-10, 02:27 AM
One more set of props for FreeMind, I use it to organize thoughts, take notes, etc.

Don't forget paper and pencil for quick or artistic mind maps.

jacob.und
03-09-10, 05:14 PM
Congratulations on getting accepted to graduate school,WeepingWillow! I'm in grad school, and love, love, love using lists and mindmaps! I highly recommend using mindmaps for all things academic. I've used mindmapping to organize papers, presentations, research topics, and even my thesis. If you happen to have an iPod Touch or iPhone, I highly recommend iThoughts. Powerful, feature-rich mindmapping software that can export your mind maps.

Paper vs. computer
I use paper and computers to create my mindmaps. There's advantages to both. Paper-based mind maps are profound. There's a sense of richness in the final product...more so than computer based mind maps. The advantage to computer mindmaps is that you can generate ideas quickly! Computer mind maps are excellent also for quickly editing and cleaning up mind maps.

Two drafts
I usually create two drafts. First draft: I write everything down, trying to not self censor at all Second draft: I organize the mind map by looking for common themes, give each areas unique colors, shapes, etc. The second draft is good for me, because it helps to minimize my perfectionist tendencies. Knowing that I'll complete a second mind map draft allows me to defer my perfectionist tendency of things having to be right

Grad school tip: Areas of interest
By the way, here's a tip on using mind-maps in grad school: figuring out areas of interest. For papers, your thesis or dissertation, you'll most likely need to figure out areas of research to explore. In order to narrow your focus, consider using a mind map, and just write down all the things you think are cool, that you enjoy or that you're fascinated with your field of interest. The key here is to be as comprehensive as possible, and to not self-censore or criticize what to write - let it flow! Look for common elements among the items your've written. Presto! you know have some avenues of exploration for research!!

Mindmapping helps me cope with ADD
On a personal level, sometimes it seems that ADD can get the best of me. Things will feel out of sorts, unwieldy at times, and often like I am just spinning my wheels and going nowhere. Mindmaps are completely in line with how I think, and so they're great for regaining perspective, and reduce the feeling of being so overwhelmed. So, I'll use mindmaps anytime I'm feeling overwhelmed by ADD......it really does help.

Congrats again on grad school!

XR,SR stoneyend
03-09-10, 05:17 PM
Im gonna look up this mind mapping :)

roarkalus
05-27-10, 10:41 AM
Freeplane is built off of freemind but it's better (prettier, more functional).

I love mindmaps for the sole purpose of breaking down projects into smaller and smaller steps. If i get stuck somewhere, i break them down some more, print them, and start working from the outside in.

I can't think of a better way to intuitively and visually break down a project. But be careful, high potential for hyperfocus/tweaking. Make sure you don't spend all day playing with the software, like I so often do.

LogicalTime
05-27-10, 06:26 PM
I really like using xmind (http://www.xmind.net/) I like how you can change the structure of each node.

I use it for my todo list. I put my 3 most immediat things under a node named "focus" and right click on the node selecting "drill down", voila - you can only see the focus node and the tasks you need to focus on. Very useful add-wise

two useful keyboard shortcuts:
enter makes a new node
tab makes a new subnode

doiadhd
05-27-10, 07:55 PM
Thank you !

I'll give it a whirl.

Prunesquallor
07-11-10, 05:32 AM
I've used the basic method for years, with pencil & paper. Helps me to break tasks down into manageable chunks.

Not helpful for me to use a computer - I need to use a notebook/pad that I can always carry with me and refer to.

Go to Amazon and look for books by Tony Buzan.

nwbucket
08-06-10, 11:34 PM
I have found mobile mind mapping to be very effective as I am not always around a computer. I don't know about other phones but the iPhone has several free and paid apps.