View Full Version : need to make a decision


Iluvpoptarts
02-08-08, 06:52 PM
Allright i need to see a psychiatrist, i'm 17, the thing is that my mom says if we go to a private one (pay 20 times more - no insurance coverage) it won't go on my medical profile (you can ask them not to record it even tho they "should" butthey dont care so np)
The thing is i don't wanna waste so much money... so what should it be?
It may save money in the long run - say if im rejected for a job because of my "pre-existing"..
Mmm..

blueyeyore
02-08-08, 10:42 PM
The only question that comes to my mind is why would a job want to see your medical history? I know I didn't have to show mine for my job. I think I've seen it mentioned here on the forums before that if you disclose to one employer and leave, then you have to disclose during the application period of the next job...*shrugs* not real sure about all the ADA things.

Another point I just saw is when you finally get your own health care it could be denied for consideration of a pre exsisting condition...not necessary the job all together. I'm not sure how that works, but my mom has switched insurance companies several times since she was diagnosed with all her health problems...there was a paper work to go through and stuff, but they covered it.

I wish I had more solid information to give you, but hopefully someone on the forums will be a bit more knowledgable when it comes to health insurance and ADA.

FrazzleDazzle
02-08-08, 11:07 PM
Your medical records stand as complete no matter of whether insurance was billed or not. Physicians are required to keep hold the same documentations, notes, tests, etc regardless of insurance. Also, insurance underwriting looks at records whether insurance was billed or not when you apply for insurance coverage on your own, and if you were found to not provide complete disclosure, they can drop you, in turn that would make it REALLY hard to get further coverage because underwriting investigates that too.

In my personal experience, it's better to cough it up and be honest with regards to your medical records, whether you pay out of pocket or through insurance. Your records will be no different, and your disclosure will be no different. Save yourself the money and go through the insurance. The only way you can protect from those records getting anywhere and possibly biting you later is to not go for treatment at all.

Hutch1ns
02-20-08, 07:45 AM
Allright i need to see a psychiatrist, i'm 17, the thing is that my mom says if we go to a private one (pay 20 times more - no insurance coverage) it won't go on my medical profile (you can ask them not to record it even tho they "should" butthey dont care so np)
The thing is i don't wanna waste so much money... so what should it be?
It may save money in the long run - say if im rejected for a job because of my "pre-existing"..
Mmm..

By law, companies cannot discriminate against you. You want the company you apply for to know about any medical conditions, handicaps ect. that you might have because they have to legally make accomidations at work for you. Plus, if you do get turned down, and you think you were qualified for the job, you can file a lawsuit against them for discrimination.

Mental disabilities are, by law, the same as physical disabilities.

"
Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (http://www.eeoc.gov/policy/ada.html) prohibits private employers, state and local governments, employment agencies and labor unions from discriminating against qualified individuals with disabilities in job application procedures, hiring, firing, advancement, compensation, job training, and other terms, conditions, and privileges of employment. The ADA covers employers with 15 or more employees, including state and local governments. It also applies to employment agencies and to labor organizations. The ADA's nondiscrimination standards also apply to federal sector employees under section 501 of the Rehabilitation Act, as amended, and its implementing rules.
An individual with a disability is a person who:

Has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities;
Has a record of such an impairment; or
Is regarded as having such an impairment.A qualified employee or applicant with a disability is an individual who, with or without reasonable accommodation, can perform the essential functions of the job in question. Reasonable accommodation may include, but is not limited to:

Making existing facilities used by employees readily accessible to and usable by persons with disabilities.
Job restructuring, modifying work schedules, reassignment to a vacant position;
Acquiring or modifying equipment or devices, adjusting or modifying examinations, training materials, or policies, and providing qualified readers or interpreters.An employer is required to make a reasonable accommodation to the known disability of a qualified applicant or employee if it would not impose an "undue hardship" on the operation of the employer's business. Undue hardship is defined as an action requiring significant difficulty or expense when considered in light of factors such as an employer's size, financial resources, and the nature and structure of its operation."

http://www.eeoc.gov/types/ada.html