View Full Version : Help me! Sooo-oo tired after fighting sleep all night. AGAIN!


English Girl
02-13-08, 07:35 PM
I'm dragging myself through the day after spending the whole of the night awake fighting and fighting and fighting sleep. Why do I do this? Does anyone else do this? Am I alone?

I've got Adult ADHD and I've been like this since I was a little girl. I remember reading and listening to the radio until 2 or 3 in the morning under the covers and my teachers telling me and my parents off because I was forever falling asleep in class. I'm middle-aged now and I STILL do it!
I find I just can't settle down because I'm so completely AWARE of everything around me - and my mind keeps on running like some mad machine.

The tiniest chink of light through the curtains keeps me awake. The smell of the fuel from cars going by makes me super-alert. The sound of shifting and toilet-flushing by my neigbours, remembering something I read about on the web, memories from 10 or 20 years ago... Aaargh! It's like I have to forever be on the alert 'just in case' something happens. What the hell is gonna happen at 3:30 in the morning???

I'm putting this message on a load of different places on the web because I know that there must be SOMEBODY out there who can suggest ways I can get to sleep. Is there some natural supplement I can use, or special treatment I can try?

And before you say warm baths, warm milky drinks, no TV or stimulating books, dark room, lavender oil, no coffee, St. John's Wort, blah blah blah. Yep, done all that, over and over again for years. And before you say, 'try drugs', nope, I don't want to go down that route because I don't want my feelings to be 'frozen'. I'n not depressed - feel quite chipper. I just force myself to stay awake, or if I wake up, then I force myself to STAY awake. Yeah, I know. It's crazy!

I'm sorry if I sound short or bad-tempered everybody. I don't usually come across that way. But today I'm so tired and so desperate, I kinda am! Somebody tell me please, What else can I try???

SuperChan
02-13-08, 07:49 PM
Has anyone mentioned Melatonin to you?

English Girl
02-13-08, 07:54 PM
I know some people take that for jet lag. Not sure of the science behind it (as I'm sure will become patently obvious), but isn't that to do with skin colouring? As a Black woman who's naturally covered in the stuff, would I need more?

FrazzleDazzle
02-13-08, 07:58 PM
Oh bless you, English girl, you DO sound in a pickle.

It reads as if you have supersensitivities and some anxieties that are keeping you awake?

I don't know much about the neurotherapies to treat particularly these things, but I have read others here have been helped by CBT, biofeedback, subliminal music at bedtime and while going to sleep, and the like for working with yourself to calm down enough to relax and sleep. I hope someone else comes on board here with some experience.

I hope you find some answers in your quest to get a good night's sleep!

FrazzleDazzle
02-13-08, 08:00 PM
but isn't that to do with skin colouring? As a Black woman who's naturally covered in the stuff, would I need more?

That would be melanin. ;)

SuperChan
02-13-08, 08:02 PM
:) that would be Melanin

Melatonin is a naturally occurring chemical in our brains. It helps regulate our sleep cycles. For more info, I believe there are lost of posts about it here. However you can go to here (http://www.melatonin.com/melatonin-faq-general.php) for some to get you started.

Sometimes the levels are off and we can help regulate those. There are two kinds made. One is derived from animals and one is not. In some countries it is considered a supplement, while others you have to get it by prescription. If you decide to take it you should always check with your doctor though.

English Girl
02-13-08, 08:18 PM
":) that would be Melanin"

Oops! How embarrassing *sheepish grin*

"Melatonin is a naturally occurring chemical in our brains. It helps regulate our sleep cycles. For more info, I believe there are lost of posts about it here. However you can go to here (http://www.melatonin.com/melatonin-faq-general.php) for some to get you started. "

Well, I immediately went and checked out that link; very interesting, thank you SuperChan. Hmmm, seems I can't use it as it's not recommended for those with a history of certain illnesses which I have suffered from in the past. Aaaaw...

"It reads as if you have supersensitivities and some anxieties that are keeping you awake?

I don't know much about the neurotherapies to treat particularly these things, but I have read others here have been helped by CBT, biofeedback, subliminal music at bedtime and while going to sleep, and the like for working with yourself to calm down enough to relax and sleep. I hope someone else comes on board here with some experience."

Frazzle Dazzle, I love every single word you've put down here. This is what I need - ideas for natural remedies that I can sustain into the long term. I'm just not loving the idea of popping pills. I mean, it's not like I'm going to 'recover' from ADD in the next 3 months is it? I'd be knocking 'em back until I was 83 and started doing that Old Lady thing of staying up all night knitting and over-feeding my 13 cats!

Does anyone know what happens with the 'biofeedback' that you mentioned? What does it do? Is it expensive?

More importantly, is it fast-working???

FrazzleDazzle
02-13-08, 08:34 PM
I recall doing some reading on melatonin, and I think I remember some concering side effects?

I wish I knew more about the neurotherapies for you, but there is a search function here, you can plug in a term and see the past postings here for some member feedback. I hope that is enough to get you started and inspired. You might also do a perusal in the miscelaneous section for some supplemental ideas for anxiety you may not be aware of. I know that I like the omegas a lot, and cannot stop talking about the benefits. They are not like taking a pill, but they do take the edges off the anxiety (they do calm me so that things are not as intense, if you understand that) and help tons with concentration (llike a cup of coffee without the physical jolt), and have NO known side effects if you are not allergic to fish. Some have had some luck here with amino acids, (particularly 5HTP, among others, which is the precursor of the sleep-inducing neurotransmitter serotonin) but that should be done under a qualified practitioner, and they also have side effects and long-term effects to be aware of.

Treating naturally takes time, patience, lots of researching and talking with your doctors of course, but there are lots of options out there.

Let us know what else we might be able to help you with and see what the others here come up with.

English Girl
02-15-08, 10:12 PM
I just wanted to say thank you to you all for helping me with your advice. I've been trying a number of different things over the past couple of days.

I've only been trying a cd so far - one of those things that change your brainwave patterns. And, silly though it may sound, I feel the problem is easier to manage simply because I've come across people who understand and recognise what I've been going through. That alone feels great.

I can't say the problem is eliminated, but I got a good 6 hours sleep last night and didn't 'fight' it as much.

I'll keep on working at it.

Thanks everyone!

English Girl

FrazzleDazzle
02-16-08, 01:04 AM
Cool beans, Girl! Keep us posted on how you are doing. I'm so happy that you got a good night's sleep. If you can't sleep, you can always hang out here, we are open 24/7!:p

tom888
02-17-08, 09:45 AM
I just quickly sum up my thoughts on this:

-anxiety, those reoccurring thought sounds like OCD
-self-fulfilling prophecy with regards to not sleep
-try the opposite! have a cup of coffee before you go to bed and see what happens.
-The delta brainwave thingy helps me too, with really nice big soft headphones. http://www.brainsync.com/product.asp?specific=142
- if noise disturbs you try ear plugs, I guess you already did and you hate them right? It takes some days to get used to them when you are it can be a gods sent. You can then hear yourself breathing and that relaxes a lot. They can be addictive :-)

dont't worry about the melatonin, once i thought that would be the solution too, but it sucks (for me). i would get extremely tired sleep and wake up 2-3 hours later and stay awake the rest of the night...

Let us know
Tom

Imnapl
02-17-08, 01:27 PM
I just force myself to stay awake, or if I wake up, then I force myself to STAY awake. Yeah, I know. It's crazy!I keep thinking about this when this thread comes up. My gut feeling is that until you explore why you need to force yourself to STAY awake, nothing you try will help.

tom888
02-17-08, 04:14 PM
PTSD, as expected

http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=49049

Imnapl
02-17-08, 04:16 PM
tom888, I have so much to learn about PTSD. Thank you.

tom888
02-17-08, 04:20 PM
We all have so much to learn Most importantly she is feeling better now....
Tom


I keep thinking about this when this thread comes up. My gut feeling is that until you explore why you need to force yourself to STAY awake, nothing you try will help.

tom888, I have so much to learn about PTSD. Thank you.

ireland
03-19-08, 08:43 PM
Firstly- are you on Medication? Stimulants have actually caused insomnia if used at a high dose- it happened to me I would be lucky to get an hour sleep and could sleep better during the day, my mind was more relaxed.

Also- Earplugs are a wonderful thing..

Secondly-it sounds like therapy might work for you to learn how to shut your mind down. I had that problem and learned that the fallowing helps greatly: prayer, meditating on bible scripture which worked for me. Or if religion is not your thing then journal what your worried about or whats going on in your mind.

TV: I heard people say not to have a tv in the bedroom. But I found if I watched a relaxing program I found my body relaxed and I could go 2 sleep every time I watched it and got my mind off of what happened during the day. weird (yes) but it worked for me. My body got into a routine that I could fall asleep within ten minutes of the show.
Again I was lucky to develop my own tips of getting over imsonia, I would recommend getting help as each individual is unique for developing strategies.

The_Colossus
03-19-08, 10:33 PM
I bought a few books on sleeping and am slowly getting through them. A few things that were mentioned.

-If you don't fall asleep in 20-30 minutes, get up and do something none stimulating for a few minutes and than go back. It teachs your body to fall asleep quicker. For me reading an encylopedia works, this approach does help but its so hard getting out of bed when your exhausted and comfy.

- Also don't do anything too simulating before bed, getting into a prebed routine helps, I like to read for a bit before hand.

- 5htp works well for alot of people, though for some it stimulates them. You could try strong prescription sleeping aids for short term to get your body on the sleeping cycle you want. Don't do that for long-term.

-Wirte down your worries or stuff you have to do tomorrow before you get to bed. This helps you to not think about them as much. Even without coming up with solutions it still surprisingly helps.

-try to think positively that you can sleep, thinking that you won't greatly increases the chances that you won't. This can be really hard as your dealing with your own mind and it knows if deep down you don't believe that you can. Its not like trying to convince someone else, but even thinking positive thoughts does make a difference.

Shutting your mind down is really important and something I definitly need the most improvement on. Visualizing peaceful and relaxing settings is good, but my mind often wonders. Çounting is omething that is decent to do, not great but better than getting you sleeping.

A good way to fight light waking you up is to tape towels to your window to block it out.