View Full Version : NVLD and writing


imadhdtoo
02-18-08, 11:39 PM
I was diagnosed with NVLD at the same time as ADHD (about a year ago). I'm a junior in college right now and I'm a terrible writer. Its a bit ironic really, because I'm currently the head tutor at the writing center, but I maintain that I can help people with it so well because I'm just so bad at it and have tried everything.

All my life, I've heard, "Whitney, you're ideas are really interesting but I can't follow your paper." I swear, ADHD and NVLD ganged up to make things hard-- not only do I go excitedly chasing after every shiny thing I see, but its really really hard to translate the mush in my brain into language that makes sense. It frustrates my professors because they say I talk about ideas really really well, but when they get my work there's a huge discrepancy (sort of story of my life). And, well, it frustrates me because I really want to write. I'm happiest when I'm hashing out ideas, and, well, actually being able to share them would be cool. At one point I was dreaming of Grad School, but these days I just think I'm too stupid.

I guess, after rambling, does anyone have any suggestions for improving writing? I just don't know where to go and I really don't want to throw my hands in the air and give up (plus, my school requires a year long senior thesis and... uh... I don't really want mine to suck...).

Thank you.

TygerSan
02-19-08, 01:27 PM
Hi, I've got signs of NVLD as well. People always tell me that I'm a good writer, but it takes me forever to organize my ideas. I find I work best if I can discuss my ideas with other people. I've always fantasized taking a tape recorder to discussion sessions so that I can remember the conclusions that I drew in conversation and translate them into written arguments. That interaction tends to firm up the "topic sentences" or the topics that I want to cover.

Usually, I don't work from outlines or stuff like that, I write ideas and then try to cut and paste them into more coherent paragraphs. Since you teach writing, I'm wondering if you know a lot about the 5 paragraph essay (or sandwich essay)? If not, it's a highly structured way of writing an essay which essentially forces you to figure out what your thesis is before starting to write, and also forces a form of outline. I hated it when I was in high school (and there are definitely people who don't like it because of its lack of flexibility) BUT it does force a sense of organization on you, and gives you a way to structure paragraphs with supporting arguments such that ppl can follow your arguments, and IMHO wasn't a bad way to teach organization and argument.

QueensU_girl
02-22-08, 05:57 PM
re: 1

"Your ideas are good, but I can't follow your paper."

I take it they are meaning is is very disorganized and doesn't flow well!

Sounds like the 'Executive Dysfunction' Gremlin.

It is a big part of ADD and LDs.

auntchris
02-25-08, 10:42 PM
the in the world is nlvd

QueensU_girl
02-26-08, 10:17 AM
re: Suggestions

I'd suggest learning how to do "mindmaps". It is free, easy and portable.

You may also want to take a look at the writing program called 'Inspiration'.

QueensU_girl
02-26-08, 10:18 AM
re: 2

Fantasized about tape recording?

If you are in school or at work, it is one of the accommodations, usually.

TygerSan
02-27-08, 08:59 AM
Fantasized about tape recording?

If you are in school or at work, it is one of the accommodations, usually.Yep, if I were in school it would be an accomodation I would be able to take advantage of. I was speaking of informal conversations with my supervisors regarding research papers and the like so I can review all the cool ideas I had but forget about in the trip back to my computer. I probably *could* get away with it, but that would require remembering the tape recorder.:p

auntchris
03-13-08, 09:53 PM
hello, what is nvld?

TygerSan
03-14-08, 11:43 AM
NVLD (or NLD) is short for non-verbal learning disability. It's a syndrome involving the impairment of non-verbal communication skills, coupled with fairly preserved verbal abilities. This site has some pretty comprehensive information, but it's a little dated, and IMHO, a little on the negative side.

http://www.nldontheweb.org/

It overlaps quite a bit with certain aspects of ADHD (executive dysfunction; inability to process spatial information, which can look a lot like inattention, but can also be a form of inattention), as well as Aspergers (impaired social skills, inability to "read" people)


(http://www.nldontheweb.org/)

NeeNee
03-14-08, 12:36 PM
A tutor who will check in with your regularly about a specific project, help you write an outline (and stick with it) would help. Your post was articulate---so you can certainly express yourself in certain forms! Also you could try dictating since you can talk about ideas comfortably. Then, once you have the "hash" on paper, you (and your tutor) can start editing it. This might feel awkward at first but once you get something finished to your satisfaction your motivation will go up. Also spending $$ on a tutor will actually keep you motivated (pay a bit in advance). Find someone who will understand your problem and give them permission to be a bit directive from the outset (not a bully, just someone who will help keep you on track). Or if you don't want to hire someone perhaps your school has a learning center.

Good luck to you and keep at it!

auntchris
03-14-08, 06:36 PM
I appreciate the post of what nvld is thanks....

backformed
04-02-08, 12:04 AM
Originally posted by NeeNee:
A tutor who will check in with your regularly about a specific project, help you write an outline (and stick with it) would help. Your post was articulate---so you can certainly express yourself in certain forms! Also you could try dictating since you can talk about ideas comfortably. Then, once you have the "hash" on paper, you (and your tutor) can start editing it. This might feel awkward at first but once you get something finished to your satisfaction your motivation will go up. Also spending $$ on a tutor will actually keep you motivated (pay a bit in advance). Find someone who will understand your problem and give them permission to be a bit directive from the outset (not a bully, just someone who will help keep you on track). Or if you don't want to hire someone perhaps your school has a learning center.That sounds like a dream come true...I really wish I had someone who understood NVLD to do that with me, even if I had to pay them. The talking out loud and refining ideas through discussion with another person is what I think would really help. As it is, my boyfriend of 7 years can no longer help me with my Reason and Argument philosophical logic class because his life has been taken over by his computer engineering course and labwork, and the counseling center on campus has literally a 1-month wait to see anyone about the inevitable subsequent overwhelming mix of anxiety and self-loathing I feel from all this (I have three conceptually difficult papers, 2 in Spanish literature and 1 in neurolinguistics, to write from previous semesters as well). Today they said that the first date they have available is the 28th. I feel guilty about taking up the nice guy's time at the Office for Students with Disabilities when I haven't even managed to follow the schedules we make together or really get much of anything accomplished. I tried the Writing Center but (probably through my own miscommunication) the student tutors there didn't seem to understand what I needed help with.

backformed
04-02-08, 12:11 AM
...but it's a little dated, and IMHO, a little on the negative side.

http://www.nldontheweb.org/

(http://www.nldontheweb.org/)

That's the website that the psychologist who did my "psychoeducational assessment" and gave me the diagnosis of NVLD recommended to me. I would tend to agree with the characterization of slightly negative, but I'm wondering why you think so. Were there any articles or sections in particular?

TygerSan
04-02-08, 03:28 PM
I tried the Writing Center but (probably through my own miscommunication) the student tutors there didn't seem to understand what I needed help with.

Sigh. . . that was the story of my educational life, especially in the small private school I attended: all of the support system was geared towards helping those with dyslexia/reading disabilities. I spell fairly well, and my issue is not so much with reading/written expression but with disorganization, distractability, and penmanship. It's not easy, is it?

That's the website that the psychologist who did my "psychoeducational assessment" and gave me the diagnosis of NVLD recommended to me. I would tend to agree with the characterization of slightly negative, but I'm wondering why you think so. Were there any articles or sections in particular?

Well, I think my view is coloured somewhat by the primary literature that Rourke has written (journal articles/case studies and the like). He was pretty much the first to characterise the syndrome, and it shows in his emphasis on the weaknesses in the syndrome. Many of his first articles focussed on individuals with Williams syndrome and other genetic syndromes (such as De Lange syndrome), who tend to have low-average to below average full scale IQ's. In fact, in one of his book chapters, the individual with the highest full-scale IQ had one of 77, which is borderline mentally retarded. It makes me wonder somewhat if the issues he sees with reading comprehension and abstract ideas are related to a lower overall intelligence. If that is the case, then individuals with higher IQ's may develop coping skills such that, while their thought patterns may be "quirky", they may not be so profoundly impaired in those domains.