View Full Version : Glasses that Block Blue-Light Could Improve ADHD Symptoms and Sleep Disorders


boone1
03-05-08, 02:55 PM
http://www.associatedcontent.com




Scientists at the Lighting Innovations Institute of Ohio's John Carroll University, under the lead of Dr. Richard Hansler, have discovered that the elimination of blue light for a couple of hours a day improve the symptoms of Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Furthermore, people suffering from sleep disorders like insomnia also seem to improve their overall quality of sleep, if the blue-light is eliminated for a couple of hours each day.

The researchers' innovation is simple and cheap but could mean the improvement of the quality of life for many. The scientists developed special glasses that block the blue light, if worn. Blocking the blue light rays results in changes of the circadian rhythm of the patient. The circadian rhythm is the process of normal and regular changes of a person's mental and physical characteristics throughout each day. Circadian is Latin for 'around a day'. In a normal daily rhythm, melatonin, the sleep hormone, is not released until a person is in darkness, when blue-light rays are not present. Thus, wearing blue-light blocking glasses cause the release of the melatonin to happen earlier in the day.

Through their research the scientists determined that the early melatonin release caused a significant reduction in ADHD symptoms. Previously, studies by scientists at the University of Toronto have also shown that advancing the circadian rhythm improve symptoms of ADHD. In the Toronto study, twenty-nine adults diagnosed with ADHD were enrolled in a three-week trial.

The Ohio researchers also determined that their method could greatly improve sleep quality. Furthermore, the scientists believe the blue-light blocking glasses can also aid in the prevention of postpartum depression and Seasonal Affective Disorders, as well as the reduction of the risk of cancer. They recommend for patients to wear the glasses a couple of hours before bedtime.
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qinkin
03-07-08, 04:34 PM
Well,
I have blue eyes.. maybe that helps??? lol

Blue light therapy, could prolly increase the quality of your vision overtime.. but I am not sure.

I'm somewhat sure, that increasing the exposure to colored lights overall, will also help a person feel better.. oddly.

Lunacie
03-07-08, 06:44 PM
The link doesn't lead to an article about this therapy, so I did a Google, and it showed what I thought it would show. The special glasses have amber-tinted lens. I just posted on another thread here about how I've been looking for a pair of those glasses for several years. I "stole" a pair from my hubby years ago that he bought for hunting in the snow, and I loved them. They blocked the glare of sunlight reflecting off other cars when I was driving in the daytime, and they blocked the blinding headlights from other cars when driving at night.

Now, I know it's been a few years ago that he bought them, but I'm sure they didn't cost over $12. I really can't afford to spend more than $50 on a pair, the ones I found via Google were over $70. Eeeek. :(

wifeandmom
03-08-08, 12:47 AM
Do a search on "Blublocker sunglasses" and you'll find them for about $15

theta
03-08-08, 05:27 AM
https://www.lowbluelights.com/

Thats the company's website. I would be shocked if blocking blue light has any effiecy at treating ADHD. So I want be buying any products. I notice they
sale a filter for your TV/computer. That got me thinking of trying to adjust the
video driver to elimate blue light.

Fuse
03-08-08, 09:46 AM
I would be interested in peer-review of their findings.

While the basic premise, as presented in this thread, is credible enough not to warrant instant dismissal, it does sound like a rather outlandish concept.

qinkin
03-08-08, 02:38 PM
I'm guessing it's a hoax..

Cuz' blue light rays do not actually cause ADD. . not really. That's just me, though..

Lunacie
03-08-08, 03:16 PM
I'm guessing it's a hoax..

Cuz' blue light rays do not actually cause ADD. . not really. That's just me, though..

I'd guess probably more along the lines of "pseudo science."

However, from my own experience I know that the lens can help with hyper sensitivity to light.

qinkin
03-10-08, 03:05 PM
In a normal daily rhythm, melatonin, the sleep hormone, is not released until a person is in darkness, when blue-light rays are not present. Thus, wearing blue-light blocking glasses cause the release of the melatonin to happen earlier in the day.
hrmm.. missed that.. cool. :)

anybody notice anything w/them?

Fuse
03-10-08, 05:54 PM
I'm guessing it's a hoax..

Cuz' blue light rays do not actually cause ADD. . not really. That's just me, though..

I know you said you missed the melatonin bit, but I'll post this anyway (as a general statement):

Just because entity A causes a disorder doesn't meant that only entity A can improve the symptoms. E.g. if dopamine imbalance causes hyperactivity, inattention, etc, then if melatonin improves concentration or hyperactivity, it could be said that these blue light glasses improves the symptoms of ADHD.

Assuming that the bit about melatonin release is actually correct.

So I'm reserving my judgement for now.

Imnapl
03-10-08, 10:00 PM
However, from my own experience I know that the lens can help with hyper sensitivity to light.Me too. I wear anti-glare lenses and wish I had had even non-prescription anti-glare glasses when I was young. I don't need my glasses for distance, but wear them all of the time because of light sensitivity.

qinkin
03-11-08, 03:20 PM
ahh yes, BUT.

Light is extremely important for overall health, I understand that anti-blue light glasses can help us calm down at the end of the day.. but then again, why not just take a nap w/a cloth over your eyes.. i dunno. guess if a person can't get to a napping spot )or doesn't like napping(.. one could nap sitting up. . .

I learn to not to be so reactive to the light.. sometimes I'm more negatively sensitive to it than at other times.. Sometimes our minds just retreat from brightness. I learn that life is not permanent. . I enjoy light while I can.

Sunlight, helps the skin produce melatonin on the skin.. . overtime, w/o overdoing it, reduces the risk of skin cancer.. so. . . . perhaps neurodegenerativeness is something to do w/light deprivation . . .

My knowelege is what is causing me to be so sensitive to this post. . . but, it's a good post.

Imnapl
03-11-08, 07:09 PM
I'm sorry, ginkin, I should have clarified which light I am sensitive too. I am only sensitive to some artificial lighting. I love sunlight, have more windows in my house than the builder thought necessary (some without blinds or curtains on them), and live in a place that gets more hours of sunlight than the rest of the province - especially in winter.

Crackerjack
03-11-08, 07:49 PM
The special glasses have amber-tinted lens. I just posted on another thread here about how I've been looking for a pair of those glasses for several years. I "stole" a pair from my hubby years ago that he bought for hunting in the snow, and I loved them. They blocked the glare of sunlight reflecting off other cars when I was driving in the daytime, and they blocked the blinding headlights from other cars when driving at night.

Now, I know it's been a few years ago that he bought them, but I'm sure they didn't cost over $12. I really can't afford to spend more than $50 on a pair, the ones I found via Google were over $70. Eeeek. :(

I used to have a pair of blue blocking sunglasses years ago. Loved them when driving (never tried them at night, though). I didn't know I had ADD then, but I can't recall acting any different than normal.

Anyway, $79 is a tad pricy. The ones I had ran for about $15 -- if that.

I'd suggest looking around a department store and seeing what you can find.

bookwurm2
03-07-09, 11:34 PM
Sleep problems are sometimes linked to ADHD symptoms, so if blue-blocking glasses help with sleep they might help some with ADHD.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090301094248.htm

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/04/080407160751.htm

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080301214734.htm

D.B. Cooper
03-08-09, 08:10 PM
UV light controls our circadian rhythm via melatonin blocking/release. Light causes a lack of melatonin and lack of light causes a release of melatonin peaking at midnight. Theres actually a disorder associated with nightshift workers that work under fluorescent lighting (normal lightbulbs dont work on the UV spectrum). They get depressed and lethargic from the lack of proper melatonin during periods of rest.

Blue lenses block light in the UV spectrum. What does this have to do with ADHD? Not a damn thing. What does this have to do with over all mental health? Everything.

mctavish23
03-09-09, 07:49 PM
fyi,

There's some fascinating research on the connection between ADHD and Conversion

Insufficiency.

Notice I'm not impyling "treatment."

I have seen this in my practice maybe 2 or 3 times over 25 + years.

It's one of many areas to explore.

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

bookwurm2
03-12-09, 03:06 AM
I wasn't aware of the link between ADHD and convergence insufficiency. That's pretty interesting.

Crackerjack
03-12-09, 03:31 AM
Blue lenses block light in the UV spectrum. What does this have to do with ADHD? Not a damn thing.

Pretty much.

After this thread popped up before I bought some blue blocking glasses from Eagle Eyes.

Didn't notice any change in my ADD at all, but I absolutely loved them for driving. So I recommend them for that much. ;):cool:

speedo
03-12-09, 08:23 PM
Don't spend a bunch of money on blue light blocking glasses. Get some amber tinted driving glasses and wear those. Amber tint blocks blue light preferentially.

That way you can spend only $10-$15 on something that does not work instead of spending hundreds of dollars on something that still won't work.

Me :D

Tossnara
05-29-14, 10:34 PM
I also read this article on yahoo voice:
http://www.printfriendly.com/print/?source=site&url=http%3A%2F%2Fvoices.yahoo.com%2Fglasses-block-blue-light-could-improve-adhd-symptoms-657079.html%3Fcat%3D5

As an programmer who stares at multiple computer screens 8-10 hours a day, I bought a pair of computer glasses a few weeks ago, they claim that the eyewear can filter 97% of blue light, I'm still not sure I really need this, but feel much better when staring in front of the computer.

The images belows are the test results(with or without the bluelight protection glasses)

http://www.halovis.com/images/12.jpg

http://www.halovis.com/images/23.jpg