View Full Version : Girls with ADHD more likely to develop eating disorders:study


Imnapl
03-26-08, 05:59 PM
Teen girls who have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder may have a much higher risk of developing eating disorders than girls without ADHD, a new U.S. study suggests.

Symptoms of ADHD can include a short attention span, a low level of organization, excessive talking, aggressive gestures and irritability. It affects five per cent of school-age children, according to the study's authors.

The study, conducted by researchers at the University of Virginia, found that girls with ADHD were more likely to develop eating disorders such as bulimia nervosa, in which a person first binges on food and then vomits to prevent weight gain.

"Girls with ADHD may be more at risk of developing eating problems as adolescents because they already have impulsive behaviours that can set them apart from their peers," Amori Yee Mikami, the lead author, said in a release issued on March 13.

"As they get older, their impulsivity may make it difficult for them to maintain healthy eating and a healthy weight, resulting in self-consciousness about their body image and the binging and purging symptoms."

The study involved 228 girls in San Francisco, 140 who had been diagnosed with ADHD and 88 girls without the condition. They were first assessed when they were between the ages of six and 12 and then five years after.

Affected 5-10% of girls with one type of ADHD

ADHD was divided into two types: one type included both inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity and the other included inattention only.

The study found that five to 10 per cent of girls with the combined type of ADHD showed "clinically-concerning eating pathology," according to the authors. This included at least one binge-eating episode in the previous year and inappropriate purging to prevent weight gain.

Only one per cent of girls with the inattention form of ADHD and none of the girls in the control group engaged in these types of eating patterns.

Girls who had ADHD were more likely to have received critical parenting as kids, to have had a more difficult time relating to peers and were more likely to be overweight.

Mikami also said that parents should be aware that girls with ADHD may be more likely to use their medications to achieve weight loss.

"An additional concern is that stimulant medications used to treat ADHD have a side-effect of appetite suppression, creating a risk that overweight girls could abuse these medicines to encourage weight loss, though we have not yet investigated that possibility," Mikami said.

The study is published in the February issue of the Journal of Abnormal Psychology.
News, Jobs, & Events

Mincan
03-26-08, 06:28 PM
yea oka

brewskijmu
03-27-08, 12:05 AM
this is EXACTLY what i was trying to talk to my doctor about but he made me seem like i was a drug-seeking lunatic. this is not the first article i've seen on this topic, but good to know it is becoming more of interest. thanks!!

Mincan
03-27-08, 12:18 AM
yea t'is true.

naturechick80
04-07-08, 06:57 PM
Eating disorders are more common in people with a need for control, but who do not have control over a large part of their lives. This helps them feel like they are achieving control over one part. It's easily imaginable that ALL ADHD/ADD girls feel like they have no control...

Ethereal
04-07-08, 07:22 PM
There's been published books about this, like "Pieces of a pussle" på Carolyn Piver Dukarm. There's definitely a link between eating disorders and ADD.

mctavish23
04-12-08, 09:56 PM
Thank you so much for bringing this up.

Girls are one of the most overlooked & either/or under/misdiagnosed groups out there.

What I've read indicates that hyperactivity /impulsivity in girls can often be manifested in risk taking behaviors;one of which is Eating Disorders.

For boys, look no further than "Beavis & Butthead" or "*******."

tc
mctavish23
(Robert)

scarygreengiant
06-14-08, 06:48 PM
This helps them feel like they are achieving control over one part. It's easily imaginable that ALL ADHD/ADD girls feel like they have no control...

That is sooooooooo true! I've always felt so OUT OF CONTROL. I have a confession to make. I often resent anorexics because the ones I've come into contact with are the overachieving Little Miss Perfect types who get straight A's and have a long resume of grand achievements. Basically, they seem like the types who are already in total control of their lives. So when they say they want more control it makes me want to scream, "F you! You're already a perfect golden girl. You wanna know what it's like to feel out of control???!!!! Try having ADHD!!!!!"

I know it's wrong and I'm ashamed for being so heartless toward anorexics. I wouldn't be surprised if the mods deleted this post. I just wanted to get it off my chest. I apologize if I've offended any anorexics.

theta
06-14-08, 07:08 PM
That is sooooooooo true! I've always felt so OUT OF CONTROL. I have a confession to make. I often resent anorexics because the ones I've come into contact with are the overachieving Little Miss Perfect types who get straight A's and have a long resume of grand achievements. Basically, they seem like the types who are already in total control of their lives. So when they say they want more control it makes me want to scream, "F you! You're already a perfect golden girl. You wanna know what it's like to feel out of control???!!!! Try having ADHD!!!!!"


Anorexics are as crazy as the rest of us though. :) Its possible from your random sampling of them you mostly oberseved the 25% that just had anorexia as their primary problem.


Psychiatric comorbidities among female adolescents with anorexia nervosa. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17987378?ordinalpos=2&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsP anel.Pubmed_RVDocSum)



This study investigated current comorbid Axis I diagnoses associated with Anorexia Nervosa (AN) in adolescents. The sample included 101 female adolescents treated at a psychiatric unit for primary DSM-IV diagnoses of AN. 73.3% of the AN patients were diagnosed as having a current comorbidity of at least one comorbid Axis I diagnosis, with no differences across AN subtypes. Mood disorders (60.4%) were most commonly identified, followed by the category anxiety disorders without obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD) (25.7%), OCD (16.8%) and substance use disorders (7.9%). Two specific diagnoses differed across the two subtypes of AN. Substance use disorder was 18 times, and the category anxiety disorder without OCD was three times as likely to co-occur with AN binge-eating disorder and purging type than with AN restricting type. Clinicians should be alerted to the particularly high rate of psychiatric comorbidities in adolescents suffering from AN.

QueensU_girl
06-16-08, 02:23 PM
I can see the dilemma in medicating females with EDs, though.

What doctor in their right mind is going to give ADD treatment (_an appetite suppressing medication_) to someone with a BMI of 17 ?

:S

IME, people with eating disorders can be very deceptive and secretive (like an addict) about their [lack of] eating too, so this is another barrier to assessment AND treatment.

I really see the disorder as an addiction (people 'get high' from self-starvation), and as an way of exerting "control" over their bodies. To me, it is another form of self-abuse, and sometimes, a form of slow suicide.

I have a friend who has a 30 year history of anorexia, and she chronically wants to die. (You'd want to, too, if you had her monster family.)

NB Some of the inattention/dissociation may COME from the starvation, too. Not eating is a good way to fry one's cognitive abilities.

browneyes_326
09-18-08, 11:53 PM
That is sooooooooo true! I've always felt so OUT OF CONTROL. I have a confession to make. I often resent anorexics because the ones I've come into contact with are the overachieving Little Miss Perfect types who get straight A's and have a long resume of grand achievements. Basically, they seem like the types who are already in total control of their lives. So when they say they want more control it makes me want to scream, "F you! You're already a perfect golden girl. You wanna know what it's like to feel out of control???!!!! Try having ADHD!!!!!"

I know it's wrong and I'm ashamed for being so heartless toward anorexics. I wouldn't be surprised if the mods deleted this post. I just wanted to get it off my chest. I apologize if I've offended any anorexics.

Oh my ... I've been bulimic, anorexic & a binge eater at different points in my life... wow that was rough to admit! My point at my thinest anorexic state I felt the same way about 'text book' anorexics ... I may have resembled them on the outside but just stop by my house unannounced or check out my car and you'd say 'Hmmm that's odd an anorexic that lives in a pigsty?'

Then again I think I been jealous & frustrated by anyone who could effortlessly keep their life organized (even if it only seems effortless)
Anyway, don't feel bad .... we all think crazy irrational thoughts about others. Saying it with such honesty helps work out the feelings ... irrational or not ;)

Rayleigh
09-24-08, 05:57 PM
I can see the dilemma in medicating females with EDs, though.

What doctor in their right mind is going to give ADD treatment (_an appetite suppressing medication_) to someone with a BMI of 17 ?

:S

IME, people with eating disorders can be very deceptive and secretive (like an addict) about their [lack of] eating too, so this is another barrier to assessment AND treatment.

I really see the disorder as an addiction (people 'get high' from self-starvation), and as an way of exerting "control" over their bodies. To me, it is another form of self-abuse, and sometimes, a form of slow suicide.

I have a friend who has a 30 year history of anorexia, and she chronically wants to die. (You'd want to, too, if you had her monster family.)

NB Some of the inattention/dissociation may COME from the starvation, too. Not eating is a good way to fry one's cognitive abilities.

Well there are many other eating problems other than anorexia. My main problem right now is over eating. Especially since I have no job and no school...I just eat all day. I have been anorexic before, and a non purging bulimic too (aka restrict/binge/restrict/binge). I think if adhd is the reason why I have had an obsession with food my whole life, then adhd medication could help..even with anorexia. Even though these pills can cause weight loss, if you are anorexic due to adhd taking these pills may STOP your need to be anorexic.

Honeybunnie8
10-15-08, 03:25 PM
Yea, I would not call myself anorexic in High school but I didn't eat much. Breakfast was tea and toast then I ate after school, I was about 100lbs..Now I have a binging problem. Medication helps A LOT. Before medication I wished I could purge but I could never make myself throw up...soo yea...

mctavish23
10-31-08, 10:21 PM
One of the many differences between males & females is the way the symptoms are manifested.

For girls with ADHD, they internalize their symptoms via anxiety & depression.

Whereas boys, we're more likely to immitate Beavis & Butthead meet *******.

ADHD is truly a lifespan disorder in which the symptoms change over time.

For example, a hyperactive child may develop into a restless & bored adolescent.

For girls, in particular, the adolescent manifestation of ADHD ( in addition to restlessness), is talking excessively.

Girls may also display disinhibited behavior via risk taking behaviors such as eating disorders, use of alcohol, tobacco and substance abuse ( as do boys), as well as promiscuity ( same for boys as well).

While some of those behaviors obviously also apply to boys, there are distinct differences.

That's why that,in addition to age referencing, it's absolutely critical to include gender referencing as well.

My impression right now is that both of those are in the works for the DSM-V.

ED's are out of my area(s) of expertise.

What I've seen though over the past 31 years is that they are among the most, if not THE most, difficult disorders to treat.

All of you are to be saluted for your courage and resilience.

tc

&

Happy Halloween

mctavish23

(Robert)

sarey
11-01-08, 05:54 AM
^^ Good, detailed post.

Ever since I was 12, I've been in and out of Eating Disorders(mainly bulimia and anorexia), but compared to then, I don't make myself sick god knows how many times a day anymore and I do eat. But I have days where I don't or I restrict, or I have a slip up and make myself sick. It's very hard. Very, very hard. But it's like home to me.

bailee33
11-01-08, 12:13 PM
Having an ED (eating disorder) for some is about weight and appearance but for others it's just a coping mechanism just like drugs or alcohol. It provides a sense of relief (from stress, the unknown, anxiety, loneliness, poor self esteem,etc) and comfort. It's a nasty rewarding cycle that severly affects the brain. Most of the time is has "nothing" to do with the food, that is just the vechile like booze or drugs, it's just a different form or outlet.

Food is readily assessable, life is revolved around food; to celebrate, for holidays, for comfort when sick. In my opinion it's a much more complicated disease to treat b/c one cannot abstain from food like you can with alcohol/drugs. It's a fine balance one must achieve.

And if one has ADD/HD it becomes much more complicated. ADD/HD causes lack of concentration, focus, attention. And as much as one with an ED wants to stop the cycle of their ED, they just do not have the tools and organizational skills to put in place for success. It's not about the amount of strength or will power one may have to overcome an ED, it's about utilizing and implementing the "tools" and practicing them over and over and over.

Recovery is almost never achieved without the support of others! This may be the most difficult step for most by having to share this most shameful, embarrassing disease that they have been trapped in for many years. The thing is, for those suffering from EDs it is not a shameful disease. When you tell others about your struggles, they become closer to you. They will view you as "normal" and they will feel more comfortable in sharing their difficulties with you.

Many people view those with EDs as perfect or having the best life with everything together. This is b/c those who stuggle with EDs are so good at hiding their disease and keeping it a secret. What others don't know is how much they are hurting on the inside, how alone they feel and how desperate they want a "normal" life.

I believe the ED is one form of coping with the ADD. A ED completely disorganizes the neurotransmitters in the brain affecting decision making, rational, impulse control and clarity. And if one has ADD then they are already struggling with these issues.

This is a horrible way to go thru life. It affects every aspect of ones life including family, friends, work, self-esteem, goals, and much more. If you really analyze the symptoms of EDs and ADD/HD you will find many similarities which go hand in hand.

I know that some people who struggle from both diseases and who have tried stimulants that the stimulants had brought much relief to their life. They finally felt "normal", they could do things in moderation, like eat; they could actaully read and comprehend what they were reading, they felt a sense of weight lifted off their shoulders.

I know many who treat ADD/HD are extremely reluctant to give someone with an ED stimulants of any type for fear that they may abuse them. These providers need to remember that some may do so (even those without EDs abuse them) and some may not. For many, weight nor food is the issue, it's about control!!!! And I think providers need to open their eyes and think "outside" the box. If stimulants provide relief of symptoms from ED and ADD for someone, I doubt they will abuse them! Especially when they can only get 1 month supplied at a time. And if the provider is doing a good job and have a "connection" with their patient then this would not be an issue. I fear that providers don't really want to take the responsibility in fullfilling their jobs and monitoring their patients who take stimulants! They need to be proactive in their care of their patients and not just push them to the side b/c they are so "busy", that's complete crap, I see that more and more in the medical field (b/c I am in it).

Mind you, these are only my opinions and I do not wish to debate them. Take from it what you wish and feel free to ask me additional questions in a non debate mannor.

Cheers
Sorry for any miss spelling!

wildstrawbery
11-19-08, 01:19 AM
thank you!! i got dx/rx'd without telling the drs about my bulimia bc i was scared they wouldnt give me the meds i needed. two of several impulse control disorders, all related i think, but i hesitate to tell anyone about everything.

Darkangel001
12-27-08, 07:06 AM
I agree you can get any sort of diagnosis without being seen as a drug seeking freak- my doc tried to convince me out of everything I say, it's like it goes in one ear and goes out the other, and you are like, ahem, are you listening to me??? Sorry about ranting again.
But I definitely agree with the article girls with add have more exaggerated emotions and notions than other girls of the same age groups and this can lead to eating disorders especially if they have other external pressure as well.

apinkpony
12-30-08, 02:55 PM
... I'm a college student now and I started on stimulant treatment this fall. Around the time I hit adolescence (13/14) I begin to binge eat. It was fairly subtle, I was riding horses 5x a week, exerting major energy into that so the weight gain was minimal. Then I stopped riding (one of worst things of my life), gained some more weight. Tried to exert control, went on an ultra restrictive diet. Gained that weight back in no time. Started driving, ate more fast food, gained more weight. Another ultra restrictive diet, then more weight gain. Rinse and repeat... Until now, with the stimulants.

For me, the binging wasn't about being in control of something. It was another symptom of how completely OUT OF CONTROL everything was. Many times did I try to take control, both w/ the ultra restrictive dieting and with purging (although I have no gag reflex, so that didn't work). Sadly, instead of seeing the other areas of my life that lacked control, I only saw this one. I never recognized the bigger picture, until college when I was not alone did I being to realize that it wasn't my biggest problem.

I didn't realize they were related, but in my case they most certainly are. Stimulants helps control my impulsive eating, just like it helps to control my impulsive spending. Sadly, in the same realm, I know that if I ever exit stimville, I will be right back to my old impulsive ways.

Ah, well. Anyway, just my two-bits for you all. Eating disorders can be wanting to be in control, and also just another facet of being completely out of control.

taterbug
02-28-09, 03:44 AM
Well I guess that I have it all...over the last 33 years my untreated and often abused ADHD self has suffered from anorexia, bulimia, self harm and alcoholism, as well as drug abuse. I have really put my body through everything.

cthulhufhtagn
03-03-09, 07:56 PM
^ It seems to me that when people have one destructive habit, they're much more inclined to partake in others.

Wintermute
03-03-09, 08:42 PM
Though I'm male, I have, in a very very low depressing part of my life, showed signs of an eating disorder. Though, it was more of a phase, or an episode of my life, rather than part of a whole disorder.

Thinking back on it, it was very likely done out of a need for control, of which I had little to none. I never really realized that before....Great post, thank you.

cthulhufhtagn
03-07-09, 12:29 AM
^ on top of that, depression can trigger loss of appetite, which can lead to under-eating, and restrictive diets can induce eating-disordered behaviors, even in previously healthy people.

StoicNate
03-28-09, 12:53 PM
I'm a GUY and started being bulimic at age 13.
I just binged as any bulimic and then made myself puke. Not a great sight to see.

At age 18, I just told myself that I have to stop doing this to myself, before my esophagus gets worn away or get some kind of a cancer.
My throat was always hurting, swallowing food hurt.
Of course it was hard to quit, since it was a habit of sorts.

Now as a 20 year old, I'm no longer bulimic. I cured myself and never went to a doctor. It can be done, just believe in yourself.

MissL
05-19-09, 08:52 PM
.. For me, the binging wasn't about being in control of something. It was another symptom of how completely OUT OF CONTROL everything was. Many times did I try to take control, both w/ the ultra restrictive dieting and with purging (although I have no gag reflex, so that didn't work). Sadly, instead of seeing the other areas of my life that lacked control, I only saw this one.

your post really hit me: my entire life ive danced/ cheerleaded ...and had very similar eating pattern/issues. I used to joke that I've been on a diet since the 8th grade.....i'm 28 now, and my eating problems still continue. I would binge/restrict....purging also didnt work for me: unfortunately its very difficult for me to puke. And yes, I always thought of this as unfortunate.

.... I often resent anorexics because the ones I've come into contact with are the overachieving Little Miss Perfect types who get straight A's and have a long resume of grand achievements. Basically, they seem like the types who are already in total control of their lives.

-I too used to resent anorexics for this reason - same as my inablity to purge: it was something that I simply could not do.....I was so jealous of anorexics....i know: how messed up is that? I mean, if I could have all these food prob.'s that rule my life: at least, could I look good on the outside?

ADD is a new Dx for me - im connecting it to my mother's side of the family: of which there are 4 diagnosed females with eating disorders.... and a few others like me with "eating problems" Ironically my cousin: who I idolized because she was a perfect size 0: and to me she obviously did not have my eating problems: turned out to be such a severe bulemic, she had to get her teeth redone....veneers.

I find this all interesting.. i'm on stimulants for the first time in my life; i finally feel "normal" where i'm not eating, standing in the door of my refrigerator, mindlessly and furiously eating the contents of random items.

sarey
05-19-09, 09:14 PM
Anorexics are seriously suffering just as much as bulimics. Both can kill. Both destory lives. Both are dangerous. Both are living HELL. I'd know, I suffer from both. It's extremely offending to hear someone say something like "I often resent anorexics because the ones I've come into contact with are the overachieving Little Miss Perfect types who get straight A's and have a long resume of grand achievements. Basically, they seem like the types who are already in total control of their lives."

Untrue. What appears on the outside, is not always what reflects the inside.

Everyone who suffers from an eating disorder is not choosing to have one. Everyone who suffers from an eating disorder has different backgrounds, different lives, and different reasons as to why it developed. Eating disorders are a way to scream to the world that the person is in a great deal of pain and is finding it hard to cope with so much in life and needs help. Each to their own on eating disorders. All are different and very complex, very serious, very dangerous, and very lethal. Just because someone may seem like their lives are wonderful; doesn't mean they are. They could have been abused. They could have been bullied. They could have a serious mental health illness. They could hundreds of other things.

This society is so awful sometimes. So insensitive and disgraceful.

pADDyjay
05-29-09, 10:10 PM
. Anorexics are seriously suffering just as much as bulimics. Both can kill. Both destory lives. Both are dangerous. Both are living HELL. I'd know, I suffer from both. It's extremely offending to hear someone say something like;
"I often resent anorexics because the ones I've come into contact with are the overachieving Little Miss Perfect types who get straight A's and have a long resume of grand achievements. Basically, they seem like the types who are already in total control of their lives."

Untrue. What appears on the outside, is not always what reflects the inside.

Everyone who suffers from an eating disorder is not choosing to have one. Everyone who suffers from an eating disorder has different backgrounds, different lives, and different reasons as to why it developed. Eating disorders are a way to scream to the world that the person is in a great deal of pain and is finding it hard to cope with so much in life and needs help. Each to their own on eating disorders. All are different and very complex, very serious, very dangerous, and very lethal. Just because someone may seem like their lives are wonderful; doesn't mean they are. They could have been abused. They could have been bullied. They could have a serious mental health illness. They could hundreds of other things.

This society is so awful sometimes. So insensitive and disgraceful.

Thanks again sarey...from a woman who has suffered with and is recovering from and eating disorder...love Patty

sarey
05-30-09, 12:02 AM
You're welcome Patty. Keep fighting the good fight. :)

pADDyjay
05-30-09, 02:02 AM
You're welcome Patty. Keep fighting the good fight. :) you too...:)

orangesky
06-01-09, 02:18 PM
Wow, this is such an emotional subject for me right now. I have always struggled from binge eating problems. I have 2 cousins who have had Gastric Bypass surgery, and it wasn't successful for one. She compensates for eating more often, and has gained most of her weight back. OK, I've been on Adderall for 3 months now, I have not binged once since. I have lost 30 pounds. This last month, I have actually decided to take advantage of it's properties and have been writing down what I eat and eating healthy and trying to stay on 1200- 2000 calorie eating plan. I've also been going to the gym more often. I lost 15 pounds this last month. Thing is, I no longer obsess over writing things down or over excercising like I used to. I no longer have panic attacks when I don't eat on time. This medication is curing my binge eating problem. I can loose weight now, when I couldn't before. It is like a miracle. I can be normal in my eating patterns. I think that adderall is also helping me concentrate at work more also, but the biggest thing is my eating. I am still having problems with cleaning. I was trying to explain to a friend what I was experiencing, and became really frustrated because he just did not understand that being overweight wasn't just a choice, and that I just had to "work harder" to loose weight. The thing is, I am loosing weight and it's not because I am working harder- I just feel normal. There is such a bias and misunderstanding and prejudism in our society about over weight people. I hope that the medications continue to work. My father and my sisters also struggle with food issues. My father was nearly 700 pounds at his highest. I am 45 years old, and have struggled all my life in so many areas of my life and was just diagnosed last year with adhd and have just recently started taking stimulant drugs- 3 months ago. I do not see a problem with using stimulant drugs to loose weight, especially, if, (as I believe and it seems to be in my case), that the cause of the weight problem and the eating disorder is the ADHD. There are so many things that are beginning to make sense in my life right now. I actually should loose 100 more pounds to be at a healthy weight. And I am actually beginning to have faith that it may actually happen. And it may happen without having to cut my stomach and intestines apart. It may just happen because of little orange or pink pills. Very emotional subject indeed.

Infinity
06-03-09, 09:15 PM
Hi Orange.

I've been a compulsive eater startingat a very young age, parents had to hide food from me.


Have you found your impulsivity has deminished now that you are on adderal?

Thanks,

Infinity~

Infinity
06-03-09, 09:48 PM
"As they get older, their impulsivity may make it difficult for them to maintain healthy eating and a healthy weight, resulting in self-consciousness about their body image and the binging and purging symptoms."

The study involved 228 girls in San Francisco, 140 who had been diagnosed with ADHD and 88 girls without the condition. They were first assessed when they were between the ages of six and 12 and then five years after.

Affected 5-10% of girls with one type of ADHD

ADHD was divided into two types: one type included both inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity and the other included inattention only.



Girls who had ADHD were more likely to have received critical parenting as kids, to have had a more difficult time relating to peers and were more likely to be overweight.



"An additional concern is that stimulant medications used to treat ADHD have a side-effect of appetite suppression, creating a risk that overweight girls could abuse these medicines to encourage weight loss, though we have not yet investigated that possibility," Mikami said.



well this is marvey,,, now how are the doctors planing on using this info . just as awareness and not helping those who have impulsivity?

if you struggle with compulsive overeating i would think it would be a relief to have something that works in your favor. i realize the level of whats to thin is a concern.

Its a hopeful study I think for those Adults who may have ADHD and it was missed as a child who had food problems . That this woud be an identify mark for them . Just like substance abusers are now looked at probable ADHD .

Infinity`~

undermythumb
06-03-09, 11:03 PM
I have ADHD and have displayed eating disorder tendencies in the past. I compare myself to everyone in every aspect so physical attributes were always going to be an issue for me and I think this is ADHD related; I can't help but analyse every nuance of myself and tear it apart. Weight loss was definitely a festering fascination of mine when I was younger.

Great article btw, there must be a correlation for a lot of people.. I know it was about control for me so it did connect to how suffocated I felt, unaware of my ADHD, thinking I was useless all the time. I remember being severely depressed with every aspect of my life so I decided that all I wanted to do was be thin because then maybe people wouldn't initially notice how ugly I thought I was and I felt my weight was mine to manipulate and mine alone, nobody could deny me control over my body. I thought I would have an external grasp on my life, however weak, and would actually be able to see the effects of my control, if that makes sense, I just wanted to feel that I was actively changing something in my life I think.


Its a hopeful study I think for those Adults who may have ADHD and it was missed as a child who had food problems . That this woud be an identify mark for them . Just like substance abusers are now looked at probable ADHD.

I agree, I think this study will be a great help. Had I known about having ADHD it would've changed things. I'm lucky because it really wasn't very bad at all but my sympathies go out to anyone who hasn't been as lucky with it. I know somewhat myself, but mostly from a friend I care greatly for and who has suffered with an eating disorder for most of her life, that it's absolutely consuming, debilitating, seemingly inescapable and addictive but it can be helped, there are underlying problems there that need to be addressed.

Infinity
06-03-09, 11:24 PM
Having an ED (eating disorder) for some is about weight and appearance but for others it's just a coping mechanism just like drugs or alcohol. It provides a sense of relief (from stress, the unknown, anxiety, loneliness, poor self esteem,etc) and comfort. It's a nasty rewarding cycle that severly affects the brain. Most of the time is has "nothing" to do with the food, that is just the vechile like booze or drugs, it's just a different form or outlet.


I agree with this .

I think eating can be a way of acting on an issue or thought rather than blurting out a response to someone ,one eats to silence . detach with Love not detach with donuts.

or getting caught up in overwhelm because you cannot focus to do a task . Food is something one can do , or to sooth the frustration brought about by the neurological difficulties of ADHD , and its not just a female problem.:cool:


And if one has ADD/HD it becomes much more complicated. ADD/HD causes lack of concentration, focus, attention. And as much as one with an ED wants to stop the cycle of their ED, they just do not have the tools and organizational skills to put in place for success.


Yes getting distrated while eating. now how much did I eat , Did I eat or not or did the Dog get it when I walked outside to empty the coffee grounds and come back a half an hour later.

As for tools . yes its real hard to pull out of a hyperfocus on some real fine tasing munchies. And when that "on" button gets turned on the off button is just not there alot of the time. and getting organized to make a meal plan and follow it . Most people want to eat spontaneously . And thats a recipe for faliure for a food addict.


It's not about the amount of strength or will power one may have to overcome an ED, it's about utilizing and implementing the "tools" and practicing them over and over and over.


Warning warning.. stand back from the fridge... :o

Infinity~

Infinity
06-04-09, 12:45 PM
That is sooooooooo true! I've always felt so OUT OF CONTROL. I have a confession to make. I often resent anorexics because the ones I've come into contact with are the overachieving Little Miss Perfect types who get straight A's and have a long resume of grand achievements. Basically, they seem like the types who are already in total control of their lives. So when they say they want more control it makes me want to scream, "F you! You're already a perfect golden girl. You wanna know what it's like to feel out of control???!!!! Try having ADHD!!!!!"

I know it's wrong and I'm ashamed for being so heartless toward anorexics. I wouldn't be surprised if the mods deleted this post. I just wanted to get it off my chest. I apologize if I've offended any anorexics.


I see how you came full circle with this Green.


I wouldn't be surprised if the mods deleted this post. I just wanted to get it off my chest. I apologize if I've offended any anorexics



I think though this is hard to look at there is a gemstone in here.

Over achievement can be a product of having ADHD , which an eating disorder is One manisfestaion of Over compensation .It ends up being another trap.

I think because of the "drive" to excell one can run rip shod over everyone else.And ruffle feathers of others .there is competiton set up for women within thier families and amungst peers and now more so for men as well in society for love & recognition. and making a good living. And the need to be right goes along with this.

(i win,,Infinity whispers...:p)


and in all of this we are all suffering.our outsides are deceptive.to our inner struggles to focus .

Infinity~

Im sure somone can come along and write this more clearly.
Not my strong suit.:o

TriciaJ
07-07-09, 09:06 PM
This was very interesting to me. I am just now realizing that I meet many criteria for ADHD and always have. My mother keeps telling me, "But you are so smart and do so well - you do not have ADHD" - obviously, she is not getting it. But...I remember always feeling different and very much like an outsider looking in, hyperobservant of others and strange things about others - like the way their hair crossed their brow or whatever. I spent all of my teenage years bulimic without treatment. I most certainly had low self-esteem and impulse control issues (shoplifted for a while, was extremely flirtatious with boys/men, that sort of thing.

This is very interesting to read.

~Tricia

meadd823
07-09-09, 06:34 AM
We are from all walks of life so we will have different opinions even if all our knowledge is equal.

However when it comes to subjects such as this some members may be less informed on a subject than others. People will be more open to education about the subject of eating disorders if they are not called names.

Fell free to correct inaccuracies but please do refrain from personal attacks. Attacking some one with personal insults not only waters down any point you may have it is also against the guidelines (http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=15843)

Imnapl
07-09-09, 12:03 PM
well this is marvey,,, now how are the doctors planing on using this info . just as awareness and not helping those who have impulsivity?

if you struggle with compulsive overeating i would think it would be a relief to have something that works in your favor. i realize the level of whats to thin is a concern.

Its a hopeful study I think for those Adults who may have ADHD and it was missed as a child who had food problems . That this woud be an identify mark for them . Just like substance abusers are now looked at probable ADHD .

Infinity`~Good point. People believe the myth that kids taking stimulant meds for ADHD will lead to drug abuse / addiction later on when in truth, statistics show that just isn't so.

OuterSpaceBrain
09-11-09, 01:49 PM
Excellent subject. I never knew there was a correlation, but I can see how it would make sense.

I've struggled with eating disorders since early high school. In 9th grade, I got stressed out and repeatedly binge ate. Then, that summer, I decided I was tired of being fat, so I starved myself and lost lots of weight. I'll admit this weight loss gave me a sudden sense of control (over everything) as well as instant popularity, since being thinner meant being hotter and thus able to wear cuter clothes. I was clinically anorexic for a little while, being 5'6 1/2" and 110 pounds, but I ended up gaining to 118 because I decided I liked binge eating once or twice a week. I didn't purge, but that was only because: 1) puking is REALLY uncomfortable and 2) I'm too vain to intentionally harm my teeth. I just starved myself when I wasn't binging.

I still sometimes have an eating disordered mindset and have to stop myself from binge eating. Other times, I have to force myself to eat because if I starve for too long, it becomes like crack cocaine and I find myself unable to stop. I suppose it is an inner struggle between impulse and control.

As for being envious of textbook anorexics who usually keep their lives so organized in every other way, the cliche dictates the grass is always greener on the other side. I have had little miss perfect types say things to me like, "I wish I could be as carefree and spontaneous as you are!" and, "WOW, you are just so unafraid to try things. I wish I could be like that!" Perhaps there is a secret little risk-taking wild child hidden deep within most of them... they just don't have the courage to get in touch with her!

OuterSpaceBrain
09-11-09, 01:51 PM
Oh... and by the way... I am much better able to control my starvation, compulsive eating, and compulsive exercising since going on meds. When they wear off, I sometimes get really hungry, but balancing my food intake throughout the day is a lifelong struggle for me.

Missi
02-05-10, 09:17 PM
I was bulimic for about 15 years. I understand the context of venting about anorexics, but all I could think is, if you spent 3o days in treatment side by side with anorexics, you'd never feel that way again. Trying to recover from anorexia is one of the most difficult things imaginable.

Of course, being bulimic was my own hell that lasted for years and it's not pc to compare levels of pain and disabilities, but being in treatment felt safe and was a relief for me. Watching an anorexic in treatment trying to eat and grasp recovery is nothing short of heartwrenching. Their disease seems even deeper ingrained, more diabolical, more dangerous, more apt to beat them in the end. I wouldn't wish it on anyone. I've no doubt that someone in the midst of anorexia or initial recovery is in at least an equal amount of pain as someone living with AD/HD and it's erroneous to confuse them with thin perfect girls.

As for my bulimia, I had the distinct knowledge and even said from early on that it was "my way of stopping the world so I could catch up." I said it to every therapist I ever had, yet this was in the early days when AD/HD was just coming to light. Think they're related? ;)

Binging numbed me out, purging forced my anger up from my toes and out of my body in the most violent way. It was my crack; I was addicted from day one and the disease had me by the tail for 15 long years. It's possible Effexor was partially responsible for my recovery, but mostly is was finally coming to a true understanding of what they say in 12 step meetings, "using isn't an option for me today."

It took me 15 years for that to click, but once I understood that as long as I kept purging as an option, I'd continue to say yes to purging, I had to take it off my list of coping strategies. Which means, the answer was no. There was no more yes. There's always that moment where you ask and then make a decision, "am I going to binge and purge?" No. Or even if I did binge, "am I going to purge?" No. It was no longer an option. I had to sit with the feelings regardless of what I'd eaten. I had to take the consequences of my actions. When I could no longer answer yes, I eventually stopped asking the question. I became an ex-bulimic. :) I haven't thrown up in about 10 years.

Oh, and yes, when I remember my own positive achievements, I do consider this my greatest success in life. I honestly believed I would never stop and would die as an active bulimic.