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ADDAWAY
03-29-08, 11:05 PM
See http://www.princetoncme.com/pdf/programs/report320.pdf (http://www.princetoncme.com/pdf/programs/report320.pdf)

There are other useful articles on ADHD if you go to the following site, hit the CME tab, and type in the keyword "adhd": http://www.princetoncme.com (http://www.princetoncme.com)

QueensU_girl
03-30-08, 12:15 PM
re: #1

I didn't see generic amphetamines [dexedrine] mentioned.

Doesn't it seem like an ad for Strattera? It mentions the benefits of "non stimulant therapy" several times at the end.

Seems like the 'take home msg' is to "prescribe Strattera". ;)

--
This is not a publication of "Princeton University", BTW.

It is a company called "Princeton Media".

Who funds Princeton CME <tm>? Eli Lilly, perchance? :)


--

Better to go with PEER REVIEWED Journals.

QueensU_girl
03-30-08, 12:19 PM
Sorry to be a hard-@$$, but my science education (psychology program; nursing science) drilled this into me endlessly.

HighFunctioning
03-30-08, 02:18 PM
Well, they did mention generic amphetamine, but they did not include generic dextroamphetamine. They did include generic Adderall (a.k.a. MAS). But then again, I don't know whether or not the immediate release formulations were actually brand name or generic.

Also, they do mention that stimulant treatment tends to be more effective than non-stimulant treatment (83% vs 62%). While there may be bias present, I don't think this is a total advertisement.

Andrew
03-30-08, 02:34 PM
From their disclosure page:

"Because PMA is focused exclusively on continuing education and news for healthcare professionals and DOES NOT perform any promotion or work for hire, PMA is defined as a company with “non-commercial interest status,” according to ACCME. (Please note that this issue was clarified in an October 12, 2007 press release from ACCME. To see the written clarification, please feel free to contact us.)"

Scattered
03-30-08, 02:48 PM
Well, they did mention generic amphetamine, but they did not include generic dextroamphetamine. They did include generic Adderall (a.k.a. MAS). But then again, I don't know whether or not the immediate release formulations were actually brand name or generic.

Also, they do mention that stimulant treatment tends to be more effective than non-stimulant treatment (83% vs 62%). While there may be bias present, I don't think this is a total advertisement.This is what I got from the article too -- I thought they were doing a general overview of the current ADD meds and that stimulents came out on top, unles other confounding issues were present.

ADDAWAY
03-30-08, 09:35 PM
The programs and publications are jointly sponsored by the University of Cincinnati and Princeton CME. Each publication sets forth, on pages 2-3, financial disclosures, any grant support as well as conflicts of interest, if any, and how they were resolved. In addition, "All educational materials are reviewed for fair balance, scientific objectivity of studies reported, and levels of evidence." The independent clinical reviewer is also disclosed.

I did not get the sense at all that there was any bias for a particular medication let alone a brand. Indeed, different meds and/or treatments (including multi-modal) are indicated for different situations.

Luthien
03-30-08, 11:23 PM
an opinion:
Strattera usually doesn't work all that well. Ask your doctor to give you a trial of a stimulant, say Concerta or Adderall XR.

I noticed that his tone gradually becomes less and less positive if you read about Strattera in Delivered from Distraction itself, in the foreword of the last print, and in this email.
He's quoting from his and John Ratey's clinical experience, plus that of others.