View Full Version : Auditory halucinations?


peace_bell
04-05-08, 03:38 AM
My partner hears conversations in the back of his mind. Especially before he goes to sleep. So he has to fall alseep with TV or other noise producing item on. He says that it is just like background chitchat rather than speaking to him. Does anyone else recognise this?

Driver
04-05-08, 05:23 AM
Is he sure they're auditory hallucinations and himself having conversations in his head?

What do the voices say? Anything relevant?

Is he on any meds? Some meds can cause psychosis. Psychosis is not typical in ADD, it is usually a sympton of bipolar & schizophrenia etc (or a whole slew of medical conditions).

He's not abusing any drugs is he?

peace_bell
04-05-08, 06:08 AM
He has been doing recreational drugs on off for the past year.

He is not on meds.

He says he can't make out what they are saying. It's as if there is babbling conversation in the back ground.

Driver
04-05-08, 06:24 AM
I strongly urge him to see a doctor (yeah I know, fat chance, he's a guy). My money is on the recreational drug use.

Check what he's been taking against the list below:


Psychotic states may occur after ingesting a variety of substances both legal and illegal and both prescription and non prescription. Psychoactive drug (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychoactive_drug) intoxication (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intoxication) or withdrawal (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Withdrawal). Drugs whose use, abuse or withdrawal are implicated include:


alcohol (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethanol)<sup class="reference" id="cite_ref-alcohol_55-0">[56] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychosis#cite_note-alcohol-55)</sup><sup class="reference" id="cite_ref-56">[57] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychosis#cite_note-56)</sup><sup class="reference" id="cite_ref-Gossman_2005_57-0">[58] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychosis#cite_note-Gossman_2005-57)</sup>
OTC drugs, such as:

Dextromethorphan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dextromethorphan)
Certain antihistamines (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antihistamine) at high doses.<sup class="reference" id="cite_ref-diphenhydramine_trip_therapeutic_58-0">[59] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychosis#cite_note-diphenhydramine_trip_therapeutic-58)</sup><sup class="reference" id="cite_ref-diphenhydramine_trip_supratherapeutic_59-0">[60] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychosis#cite_note-diphenhydramine_trip_supratherapeutic-59)</sup><sup class="reference" id="cite_ref-diphenhydramine_poisoning_psychosis_60-0">[61] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychosis#cite_note-diphenhydramine_poisoning_psychosis-60)</sup><sup class="reference" id="cite_ref-Promethazine_61-0">[62] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychosis#cite_note-Promethazine-61)</sup>
Cold Medications (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Cold_Medications&action=edit&redlink=1)<sup class="reference" id="cite_ref-62">[63] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychosis#cite_note-62)</sup> (ie. containing PPA (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phenylpropanolamine), or phenylpropanolamine (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phenylpropanolamine))


prescription drugs:

barbiturates (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbiturate)<sup class="reference" id="cite_ref-de_Paola_et_al_2004_63-0">[64] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychosis#cite_note-de_Paola_et_al_2004-63)</sup><sup class="reference" id="cite_ref-Sarrecchia_et_al_1998_64-0">[65] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychosis#cite_note-Sarrecchia_et_al_1998-64)</sup>
benzodiazepines (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benzodiazepine)<sup class="reference" id="cite_ref-White_et_al_1982_65-0">[66] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychosis#cite_note-White_et_al_1982-65)</sup><sup class="reference" id="cite_ref-Jaffe_et_al_1986_66-0">[67] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychosis#cite_note-Jaffe_et_al_1986-66)</sup><sup class="reference" id="cite_ref-Hallberg_et_al_1964_67-0">[68] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychosis#cite_note-Hallberg_et_al_1964-67)</sup>
Isotretinoin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isotretinoin)
Anticholinergic drugs

atropine (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atropine)<sup class="reference" id="cite_ref-Bergman_et_al_1980_68-0">[69] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychosis#cite_note-Bergman_et_al_1980-68)</sup><sup class="reference" id="cite_ref-Varghese_et_al_1990_69-0">[70] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychosis#cite_note-Varghese_et_al_1990-69)</sup>
scopolamine (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scopolamine)<sup class="reference" id="cite_ref-Barak_and_Weiner_2006_70-0">[71] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychosis#cite_note-Barak_and_Weiner_2006-70)</sup>
Jimson weed (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jimson_weed)<sup class="reference" id="cite_ref-Kurzbaum_71-0">[72] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychosis#cite_note-Kurzbaum-71)</sup>


antidepressants (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antidepressants)
L-dopa (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L-dopa)
antiepileptics (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antiepileptics)<sup class="reference" id="cite_ref-72">[73] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychosis#cite_note-72)</sup>
medications (usually cold medications) that contain phenylpropanolamine (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phenylpropanolamine) or PPA (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phenylpropanolamine) <sup class="reference" id="cite_ref-73">[74] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychosis#cite_note-73)</sup>





Illegal drugs, including:

Stimulants

cocaine (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cocaine)<sup class="reference" id="cite_ref-74">[75] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychosis#cite_note-74)</sup>
amphetamines (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amphetamine)<sup class="reference" id="cite_ref-Diaz_75-0">[76] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychosis#cite_note-Diaz-75)</sup>
methamphetamine (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methamphetamine)<sup class="reference" id="cite_ref-Diaz_75-1">[76] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychosis#cite_note-Diaz-75)</sup>
methylphenidate (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methylphenidate)<sup class="reference" id="cite_ref-Diaz_75-2">[76] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychosis#cite_note-Diaz-75)</sup>
MDMA (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MDMA) (ecstasy)


hallucinogens (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hallucinogens)

cannabis (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cannabis)
psilocybin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psilocybin)
mescaline (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mescaline)
PCP (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phencyclidine)


psychotropics (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychotropic)

LSD (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LSD)<sup class="reference" id="cite_ref-psychotic_PCP_rats_76-0">[77] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychosis#cite_note-psychotic_PCP_rats-76)</sup>

peace_bell
04-05-08, 07:12 AM
I agree. It think it is the drugs. He has phoned NHS direct helpline in the past. They suggested he went to the doctors.

I've mentioned the fact that he hasn't been yet. His response was 'yeah but you haven't been either'. Always manages to turn the conversation round to me. lol

He made out that the problems were with me at first. The fact that I'd get hurt and show emotion and want to disscuss things. He made out I was being needy and treats me as though I am attention seeking and controlling. He would have been right if he'd have met me ten years ago but I've learnt alot since then. :)

I kinda know I've got to sit and wait for him to do it. I'm gonna have to take a loan from the patience bank I think

Driver
04-05-08, 07:23 AM
Always manages to turn the conversation round to me. lol

He made out that the problems were with me at first. The fact that I'd get hurt and show emotion and want to disscuss things. He made out I was being needy and treats me as though I am attention seeking and controlling. He would have been right if he'd have met me ten years ago but I've learnt alot since then. :)

I'm pretty sure I've said to you prior how clever ADD'ers can be in conversations: they'll quickly railroad a conversation to steer it away from the real issue (where the real issue is something that is their fault). The trick is to detect when they're trying to change the subject then you just ignore it and continue with what you're saying. :) Just never give them an inch.

peace_bell
04-05-08, 10:14 AM
Cheers for all your adivce, you've been very helpful. I feel I learnt alot over the past couple of days on this forum. I'm pleased I found it.

QueensU_girl
04-05-08, 11:33 AM
They are probably sleep-related.

They are not "real hallucinations", in the traditional sense (e.g. schizophrenia; psychosis).

GOOGLE "Hypnagogic" hallucinations.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypnagogia




They are related sometimes to Sleep Paralysis and some Sleep Disorders. Sleep deprivation makes them WORSEN. (And i don't mean necessarily "fewer hours". Some people can have a lot of sleep, but have very fragmented sleep, to the extent that they are effectively 'sleep deprived'.)

Talk to his Sleep Doctor.

adhdogwalker
04-09-08, 12:43 AM
Real hallucinations are when you're walking down the street and people are yelling things in your ear. Then when you chase after them to ask them why they said that and you discover that they don't even speak english, you know you have a problem. This happened to me about a month ago when I had a psychotic episode due to my bipolar. The babbling voices in the back of his mind seem more like racing thoughts than serious hallucinations.

flo-mo
04-09-08, 08:03 AM
yeah blatently the drugs maybe if he doesnt go to the doctors then u should print some stuff off the web n leave it for him to see.
well good luck anyways x

reesah
04-10-08, 02:25 PM
haha that list lists every single street drug.only time I've heard of this from street drugs is from psychedelics, or from prolonged use of speed or stimulants.

QueensU_girl
04-15-08, 10:42 PM
I understand that external auditory hallucinations tend to be drug-induced (speed; coke) or related to psychotic conditions like bipolar (mania) or schizophrenia or delusional disorders.

Internal hallucinations [where the voice comes from INSIDE the person's head] can be DID/MPD/PTSD.

ozchris
04-16-08, 12:02 AM
Could be onset of a mental disorder like schizophrenia but I doubt it. Sometimes rec. drug use in some people can trigger latent mental conditions.

Try and convince him to lay off the drugs for a while. Especially if he's doing it everyday.

What drugs has he been using? Any history of mental disorders in his family? (ie: depression, bipolar, schizophrenia etc.)

Imnapl
04-16-08, 12:13 AM
GOOGLE "Hypnagogic" hallucinations.I don't get paralysis or pain, but I do "see" and "hear" things in that sleep / wake state. It happens often enough it doesn't surprise me anymore. My husband still teases me about the time I insisted there was a dog on my pillow. Thanks for another great reference, Queens.

Bluerose
04-16-08, 12:19 AM
I have experienced this and I remember it quite clearly. I too used the TV to block it out. I struggled to make out what was being ‘said’. I got so frustrated that I lost my head and cried out to no one in particular, “If you want me to understand this you will have to make it a lot clearer!" It frightened me a bit in the beginning. I eventually told my doctor and she gave me some meds that she said would stop this from happening. While trying to tell her, I was struggling and got a bit upset. When I finally got it out she said, “Is that all, we can fix that.” She wasn’t at all surprised. I tried taking the meds but I have trouble taking meds. I just got used to it and in the end it faded. The thing is to stay calm and not be afraid of it. It’s just an episode and it passes. Strange as it may sound it seems to get worse the more upset you get. It would help to talk to the doctor or psychiatrist. They know how to deal with this, I promise you.

SuzzanneX
04-16-08, 12:27 AM
I have auditory voices in my head...
....sometimes they have good ideas..I wonder if it's hallucinations or
my thought patterns now.
....I thought they lived in my head, like they belong there.
hmmmm.

SuzzanneX
04-16-08, 12:32 AM
in fact, my dr put me on lexipro..
...and I got a new voice, I called "the chemical voice"
it hated me.

I don't take lexipro now.

...it told me I should kill myself because nothing was gonna help me.

me and suzette (my addiction voice) were scared.

.....suzette just tells me I'm a drug addict, and that's what I should be
because that was what I chose for myself, and I don't know how to be anything else
so why bother staying clean?
........she's tied to a chair in the rotten part of my brain.

I'm used to her.

....she never told me to snuff it.

Bluerose
04-16-08, 12:38 AM
Someone tried to explain it to me once but I'm not sure I got it all. It seems we become aware of sounds in our head and while wondering what it is, our subconscious 'offers up’ explanations and we accept what comes... Doesn't mean that is exactly what it is. I think there is a reasonable explanation but at the time it can be a bit frightening.

Imnapl
04-16-08, 09:26 AM
Someone tried to explain it to me once but I'm not sure I got it all. It seems we become aware of sounds in our head and while wondering what it is, our subconscious 'offers up’ explanations and we accept what comes... Doesn't mean that is exactly what it is. I think there is a reasonable explanation but at the time it can be a bit frightening.Sort of like how we interpret a near death experience or a drug trip? Makes sense.

Bluerose
04-16-08, 01:09 PM
I haven't experienced either of those but I have seen it in movies and I would say yes, a bit like that. I talked to a priest about it (I'm not catholic, it was my stepfather's priest), and he was very kind and understanding and said that he knew of quite a few people who experienced it. This reassured me some. I was also asked if the voices told me to do good or bad. Some significance there I think. But I have got nothing but helpful ‘stuff’. Like guidance in a way. Example, cooking dinner one night for my family, three or four pots boiling and simmering on the stove, kids running in and out, I got this niggling voice that I didn’t have the time to register properly, then it got more persistent, in the end I yelled, “Okay! I hear you!” I was being warned that the potatoes were boiling dry. I felt like a fool yelling at myself in the kitchen.

waffle_pimp
05-16-08, 11:59 PM
im suprised more people don't find this familier....i've had that "background conversations" thing as long as i can remember. ive mentioned it to my drs before no one ever seemed to thin too much of it. except one dr who prescribved abilify (for bipoler and schizophrenia,im not diagonosed as either) and it didnt affect it at all. i always thought of it being akin to the racing thoughts you know? just too much going on in my mind....i always thought it was worse at night or if im stressed.

ADDAWAY
05-17-08, 12:02 AM
Is ADDF emitting weird sounds ... is that why all these "sound" posts and threads are sounding out today? ;)

speedo
05-17-08, 08:31 AM
Stimulants like adderall or ritalin can cause "brain chatter".

There is an old thread on the topic:

http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=14681&highlight=head+chatter

Me :D


My partner hears conversations in the back of his mind. Especially before he goes to sleep. So he has to fall alseep with TV or other noise producing item on. He says that it is just like background chitchat rather than speaking to him. Does anyone else recognise this?

mon.bleu
10-26-08, 04:08 AM
It's might just be Hypnagogia. I get that too, esp if I haven't slept very well the past couple of days, and I don't do any recreational/illegal drugs. I also don't have any disorder other than ADHD. Most of the time it's nonsensical background chitchat inside of my head. Is it inside his head or outside of his head that he hears it?

Here's some symptoms:

Sensory phenomena
Transition to and from sleep may be attended by a wide variety of sensory experiences. These can occur in any modality, individually or combined, and range from the vague and barely perceptible to vivid hallucinations.
Sights
Among the more commonly reported, and more thoroughly researched, sensory features of hypnagogia are phosphenes which can manifest as seemingly random speckles, lines or geometrical patterns, including form constants, or as figurative (representational) images. They may be monochromatic or richly coloured, still or moving, flat or three-dimensional (offering an impression of perspective). Individual images are typically fleeting and given to very rapid changes. They are said to differ from dreams proper in that hypnagogic imagery is usually static and lacking in narrative content, although others understand the state rather as a gradual transition from hypnagogia to fragmentary dreams, i.e. from simple ‘eigenlicht’ to whole imagined scenes. Hypnagogia can be induced with a Dreamachine, which uses a pulsing frequency of light close to alpha waves to create this effect. Descriptions of exceptionally vivid and elaborate hypnagogic visuals can be found in the work of Marie-Jean-Léon, Marquis d'Hervey de Saint Denys.
The ‘Tetris Effect’
People who have spent a long time at some repetitive activity before sleep, in particular one that is new to them, may find that it dominates their imagery as they grow drowsy, a tendency dubbed the Tetris effect. This effect has even been observed in amnesiacs who otherwise have no memory of the original activity. When the activity involves moving objects, as in the computer game Tetris, the corresponding hypnagogic images too tend to be perceived as moving. The Tetris effect is not confined to visual imagery, but can manifest in other modalities also. For example, Robert Stickgold recounts having experienced the touch of rocks while falling asleep after mountain climbing. This can also occur if people swim in waves shortly before going to bed, and "feel" the waves as they drift to sleep, or people who have spent the day skiing who continue to "feel snow" under their feet.
Sounds
Hypnagogic imagery is often auditory or has an auditory component. Like the visuals, hypnagogic sounds vary in intensity from faint impressions to loud noises, such as crashes and bangs (exploding head syndrome). People may imagine their own name called or a doorbell ringing. Snatches of imagined speech are common. While typically nonsensical and fragmented, these speech events can occasionally strike the individual as apt comments on – or summations of – their thoughts at the time. They often contain wordplay, neologisms and made-up names. Hypnagogic speech may manifest as the subject’s own ‘inner voice’, or as the voices of others: familiar people or strangers. More rarely, poetry or music is heard.
Sleep paralysis
Humming, roaring, hissing, rushing and buzzing noises are frequent in conjunction with sleep paralysis (SP). This happens when the REM atonia sets in sooner than usual, before the person is fully asleep, or persists longer than usual, after the person has (in other respects) fully awoken. SP is reportedly very frequent among narcoleptics. It occurs frequently in about 6% of the rest of the population, and occurs occasionally in 60%. In surveys from Canada, China, England, Japan and Nigeria, 20 to 60% of individuals reported having experienced SP at least once in their lifetime. The paralysis itself is frequently accompanied by additional phenomena. Typical examples include a feeling of being crushed or suffocated, electric ‘tingles’ or ‘vibrations’, imagined speech and other noises, the imagined presence of a visible or invisible entity, and sometimes intense emotion: fear or euphoria and orgasmic feelings. SP has been proposed as an explanation for at least some alien abduction experiences.
Other sensations
Gustatory, olfactory and thermal sensations in hypnagogia have all been reported, as well as tactile sensations (including those kinds classed as paraesthesia or formication). Sometimes there is synaesthesia; many people report seeing a flash of light or some other visual image in response to a real sound. Proprioceptive effects may be noticed, with numbness and changes in perceived body size and proportions, feelings of floating or bobbing, and out-of-body experiences. Perhaps the most common experience of this kind is the falling sensation, and associated hypnic jerk, encountered by many people, at least occasionally, while drifting off to sleep.

Impromptu_DTour
04-14-09, 03:35 AM
I know for myself i have auditory hallucinations when im fatigued or extremely stressed out. But i only have one specific hallucination and im starting to feel that it is related to a traumatizing event that i went through a couple years ago.

crashbang
04-29-09, 03:44 PM
strangely enough I posted something slightly..and I say slightly similar in another forum (under anxiety and Panic attacks)

crashbang
04-29-09, 03:44 PM
ps. I do not hear other voices or chit chat, but my own inner monologue speaking loudly sometimes.

Carissa
05-01-09, 06:29 PM
My partner hears conversations in the back of his mind. Especially before he goes to sleep. So he has to fall alseep with TV or other noise producing item on. He says that it is just like background chitchat rather than speaking to him. Does anyone else recognise this?

Yes , a lot of people do! It is just part of falling asleep!
Especially if a person is very tired afer a long day, the mind is still working even if you would like to turn it off!
That's called imagination!

My 33 year old sister (who is the picture of perfect mental and physical health) describes it as like being in a school cafeteria. and hearing snippets of conversation in the distance. And seeing little bits of assorted experiences behind our closed eyes....Right before sleeping.
I have ADHD and am 43- I have the same experience.
We both are amused by it ,and try to see if we can learn something from it.!

Crazybutcute
05-01-09, 07:50 PM
I suffer from true insomnia and have had episodes where I literally didn't sleep for 4 days. I have heard and seen things that just aren't there. Not a good feeling at all! However, at least for me, it does go away after catching up on the sleep...I would suggest that he stop using recreational drugs and see if it stops. If not, or if he isn't sleeping, see a Dr about sleep medication. Good luck!